Titanic's bridge windows.


William E

Member
Oct 3, 2020
3
5
3
What are these 'panels' attached to the bottom of the Titanic's navigating bridge (the one marked in yellow)? Also, what are they for, if anyone knows.
 

Attachments

  • titanica-edited.jpg
    titanica-edited.jpg
    11.7 KB · Views: 64
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users

Thomas Krom

Member
Nov 22, 2017
110
166
88
Hello William,

Those are the round protective bulls eye lights. 8 of the 9 forward facing 37 inches in length by 30 inches in width. Only the sixth window from the port side to the starboard side or fourth window from the starboard side to the port side. Just as the windows they were measured 37 inches in length by 30 inches in width. They were installed after the maiden voyage of the Olympic on request of captain Smith to Thomas Andrews Jr, which he wrote in his notebook.

I hope this may helps you with clearing up the subject.

Your sincerely,

Thomas
 
  • Like
Reactions: 3 users

Cam Houseman

Member
Jul 14, 2020
1,256
171
128
15
Maryland, USA
Hello William,





Those are the round protective bulls eye lights. 8 of the 9 forward facing 37 inches in length by 30 inches in width. Only the sixth window from the port side to the starboard side or fourth window from the starboard side to the port side. Just as the windows they were measured 37 inches in length by 30 inches in width. They were installed after the maiden voyage of the Olympic on request of captain Smith to Thomas Andrews Jr, which he wrote in his notebook.





I hope this may helps you with clearing up the subject.





Your sincerely,





Thomas
This man knows. Great answer!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Dec 27, 2017
59
32
48
Isle of Man
What are these 'panels' attached to the bottom of the Titanic's navigating bridge (the one marked in yellow)? Also, what are they for, if anyone knows.
As to their purpose they were raised in exceptionally bad weather conditions to protect the bridge area in case the main windows were shattered by high waves.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

William E

Member
Oct 3, 2020
3
5
3
Hello William,

Those are the round protective bulls eye lights. 8 of the 9 forward facing 37 inches in length by 30 inches in width. Only the sixth window from the port side to the starboard side or fourth window from the starboard side to the port side. Just as the windows they were measured 37 inches in length by 30 inches in width. They were installed after the maiden voyage of the Olympic on request of captain Smith to Thomas Andrews Jr, which he wrote in his notebook.

I hope this may helps you with clearing up the subject.

Your sincerely,

Thomas
Thank you for that fine answer!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Stephen Carey

Member
Apr 28, 2016
148
77
73
Philippines
Called "deadlights", along with those on portholes used to stop light shining out (hence the name) and to stop water coming in in the event that the glass was broken.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
May 3, 2005
2,599
280
278
Hello William,

Those are the round protective bulls eye lights. 8 of the 9 forward facing 37 inches in length by 30 inches in width. Only the sixth window from the port side to the starboard side or fourth window from the starboard side to the port side. Just as the windows they were measured 37 inches in length by 30 inches in width. They were installed after the maiden voyage of the Olympic on request of captain Smith to Thomas Andrews Jr, which he wrote in his notebook.

I hope this may helps you with clearing up the subject.

Your sincerely,

Thomas
Hello Thomas-

Were these installed just on earlier ships such as the Olympic ?
For example, I have visited the bridge on the old (RMS Queen Mary (1936)/now Hotel Queen Mary).
The windows on the bridge seem to be fairly large but had nothing like those panels with the "protective bulls eyes" on the Titanic ?
Had the technology of the window glass advanced so much such that protective measures such as this were no longer needed ?
Or were the bridge windows on Titanic much larger and needed them because of their size ?
I notice you mentioned they were installed "after the maiden voyage of the Olympic". Had their been any problem or problems on the maiden voyage with glass breakage ?

My thanks to you, too !

As I have often mentioned I did serve about only about 2 1/2 years " sea duty"service of my four years enlistment in the U.S. Navy, but have never considered myself eligible to call myself a " sailor " and their is so much on these forums that I had never even heard of during my short service. And have learned so much that is much appreciated on these forums.
 
Last edited:

Thomas Krom

Member
Nov 22, 2017
110
166
88
Hello Mr. Page,

The round protective bulls eye lights were on a few large White Star Liners in the past, most notably the Adriatic which was captain Smith’s previous ship before he took command of the Olympic in June 1911. Since captain Smith saw they were not implemented he requested to Thomas Andrews Jr to install them. Thomas Andrews Jr noted is request as following:

“14) Captain Smith strongly recommends protective windows with round bulls eye lights to be fitted in way of square windows on centre shelter navigating bridge as in Adriatic .”

There were no problems during the maiden voyage of the Olympic but captain Smith requested them in case any storm or bad weather could come. Harland and Wolff learned from omitting them from the Olympic during her maiden voyage and installed them on the Titanic before her sea trails began.

I am uncertain about any evolvements on future vessels post-1912, due personal reasons, so I cannot say anything for certain.

I hope this may help.

Yours sincerely,

Thomas
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
May 3, 2005
2,599
280
278
Hello Mr. Page,

The round protective bulls eye lights were on a few large White Star Liners in the past, most notably the Adriatic which was captain Smith’s previous ship before he took command of the Olympic in June 1911. Since captain Smith saw they were not implemented he requested to Thomas Andrews Jr to install them. Thomas Andrews Jr noted is request as following:

“14) Captain Smith strongly recommends protective windows with round bulls eye lights to be fitted in way of square windows on centre shelter navigating bridge as in Adriatic .”

There were no problems during the maiden voyage of the Olympic but captain Smith requested them in case any storm or bad weather could come. Harland and Wolff learned from omitting them from the Olympic during her maiden voyage and installed them on the Titanic before her sea trails began.

I am uncertain about any evolvements on future vessels post-1912, due personal reasons, so I cannot say anything for certain.

I hope this may help.

Yours sincerely,

Thomas
Thomas-

I am uncertain and I would have to look more closely, but I don't recall seeing them in any of the Titanic movies.
Thanks again !
Every little bit and every big bit certainly helps !

Robert
 

Similar threads

Similar threads