Titanic's Jewelry


Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>You prove with your sources that what I and other people have read per books written by credible historians,news paper clippings,documentaries and TITANIC INC who own the wreck is not true can your sources prove that.<<

Joshua, you're the one making the claims here so the burden of proof falls on you. It's already been shown to you that the sources you've cited are not only secondary, but even come with disclaimers of their own. You might want to go back through some of these threads and read them.

>>I still don't think they would lie about a claim becouse insurance companies could have hired there own investigators to watch and learn the truth.<<

Why not? As I already pointed out in another thread, insurance fraud in the wake of a disaster is a very old game. Think that people don't or can't lie about something like this?

Guess what, they do!

>>Can your sources prove the widows were lying in there time of morning.<<

Do you have primary sources which demonstrate that some of them weren't? If so, present them. Not somebody's take on them, but the primary sources themselves. Remember, you make the claim, you provide the bona fides.

>> They did not know the ship could be raised.<<

As a matter of fact, it can be reasonably pointed out that they knew very well that the ship couldn't be raised, and she still can't be. The technology required for such a job is as beyond the current state of the art as it is pointless. Even if the hull itself had been made out of solid gold, the return couldn't possibly pay the costs of such an undertaking. Also, the location of the wreck was known within 13 miles and the extreme depths were also known in 1912, as well as the practical impossibilities that went with the deal. (The wishful thinking of Colonel Astor's son notwithstanding.)

>>The Titanic is apparently not so big anymore for James Cameron to go through it now is it.<<

Which they couldn't do in 1912. It's a helluva lot easier to push a bogus insurance claim when it's not possible to check the wreck where they're alleged to be. Anyone willing to chance advancing such a claim would have known this.
 

Paul Lee

Member
Aug 11, 2003
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Michael, I think we should throw in the towel on this debate. We simply can't argue with the mighty logic and evidence presented by someone who has read five whole books on the disaster - and probably coloured in the black and white pictures with crayon.

I must bow to superior knowledge.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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I don't think we need to go that far. If Mr. Tift wants to believe some of what he does, even knowing how shaky the evidence is, he's certainly free to do so. Frankly, I don't understand the obsession with the idea of the Titanic being a treasure ship. It's interesting as an historical abstract to speculate on and even learn what the passengers and crew brought with them in the way of valuables, but is it really important?

I think not.

The hull could have been made of gold, platinum, and silver, the portholes could have been made of diamonds, the contents of Fort Knox could have been stashed in the holds and in the grand scheme of things, it just doesn't matter worth a hill of beans.

What matters is that human error reared it's head and 1500 lives came to a violent, horrifying and abrupt end with the lives of the stunned survivors forever changed...and not for the better.

Kind of hard to trump that one. Isn't it?
 

Shane Worthy

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Aug 12, 2004
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Everyone,
Let's not get in a war of words here. I believe that has happened before with Mr. Tift and nobody would want THAT again.
All Ahead Full!
Shane N. Worthy
 
H

Holly Hewlett

Guest
Isn't it true that there was a large safe onboard the Titanic where expensive jewellery was kept? I was watching that programme about the Titanic last night (Tony Robinson's something-or-other) and they found the safe but couldn't open it because of certain rules and regulations. But apparently the jewellery will still be inside because during the sinking, crew members refused to give them back to their owners. What do you think? Is this story plausible? If so it is definitely worth looking into. Holly.
 
Jan 29, 2001
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Holly:

There were some lovely pieces of jewelry retrieved from the TITANIC over several years of salvage. Please refer to the RMS Titanic Inc. website for striking examples.

These artifacts are now palpable to us...we can touch them...and convey the soorrow of which they represent so powerfully.

Michael Cundiff
USA
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Isn't it true that there was a large safe onboard the Titanic where expensive jewellery was kept?<<

That would have been the Purser's safe. See above the reference that it was known/asserted to have been cleaned out befor the ship sank.

>>I was watching that programme about the Titanic last night (Tony Robinson's something-or-other) and they found the safe but couldn't open it because of certain rules and regulations.<<

RMSTI as Salvor-in-possession has the sole rights to salvage from the wrecksite, (Read that to mean The Debris Field) with the stipulation that the hull itself is off limits.

>>But apparently the jewellery will still be inside because during the sinking, crew members refused to give them back to their owners. What do you think? Is this story plausible?<<

It's not outside the realm of possibility, though I think the stories of Titanic being some sort of treasure ship tend to be way overrated. The passengers would have had quite a bit of jewelry though this was common enough on any ship. When the rich and famous went overseas, they tended to want to take their goodies with them. Titanic would hardly have been unusual in that respect. I would think that if there's any substantial "treasure" down there, you would likely find a consignment or two in the cargo holds or statshed in a secure strongroom along with any gold specie/bullion that may have been carried.

Again, this was common enough. In the days befor money transfers were done by computer data transfers, payments were made between banks that way. For obvious reasons of security, this is something that was not widely advertised, much less published on a manifest that would be available to all and sundry as it would attract all sorts of attention from some really unsavoury sorts of people.

Perhaps Noel Jones would care to comment on this as he seems to have a much better grasp of how all this was done.
 

sally frost

Member
Dec 6, 2010
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I know this is a bit off the mark of what you have been talking about please bare with me new to message boards and i certainly do not want to talk out of turn and maybe this question has been asked and answered already but i often wonder what people think of the hidden treasures ie all the passengers possessions gold etc of the titanic and wether this may be underneath the ship or buried deep inside ....i know they have recovered numerous artefacts but have never heard of any recovery of jewels etc i hope i am not speaking out of turn regarding this and certainly do not want to offend anybody many thanks

[Moderator's note: This post, originally posted in an unrelated thread in another subtopic, has been moved to the one discusssing the same subject. JDT]
 
Feb 6, 2005
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Did the Purser's office close that night and was re-opened during the sinking so that 1st class passengers could recover their valuables, as shown in A Night to Remember?

Perhaps somebody here can unlock the answer for me.

[Moderator's note: This post, originally posted in a separate thread in another subtopic, has been moved to the pre-existing one discussing the Purser's office. JDT]
 

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