Titanic's launch


May 3, 2005
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According to the commentary (Don Lynch and Ken Marschall) on the ANTR DVD, the launch scene was actually that of the Queen Elizabeth ca. 1938. Also comments that pictures of... "ships moving about the harbor"..."none of them the Titanic or the Olympic"...were of the Aquitania and Lusitania, etc. Also no christening took place on Titanic launch. Also...If you will look carefully, there is one lady in the crowd in the launch scene in very 1930's-ish style of attire. :)
 
Nov 1, 2008
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It is an interesting recreation, but I believe that the advent of color film was much later, so it is definitely, as the poster says, from a movie or television show. Cool though.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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That's the tail end of Titanic: Birth of a Legend, a dramatised documentary made in 2005. It tells the story of the conception and building of the ship, and ends with the sea trials.
 
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Alyson Jones

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Does anybody know why that the oylimpic was launch white,and the Titanic was launch black[Black the normal colour of the ships].?
I personaly think that the white coating was much more pretter than the black.
So why was Oylimpic change to the Black coating?
Wished they were kept with the white coating,after all Oylimpic and Titanic would of stood out much more,those days every ships hull was black!
What do you guys/girls think?
 

Kevin Keating

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Apr 1, 2007
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From what I've heard the Olympic was painted white so she could stand out for photo opportunities. Since she was the flagship of the Olympic class, the White Star Line wanted to make sure she was visible to photographers and the press (she stood out more as a white ship than a black one). Not entirely sure why she was later changed to black, but I think that was the color scheme of most White Star ships (white/yellow hull stripe/black/red), so she was changed to have a black hull to match the rest of the White Star Line fleet.

I think that's right, but please correct me if I'm wrong.
 
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Alyson Jones

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I think the Oylimpic was actually made with a white coating,i saw a phototgraph when she was being built and her the Oylimpic's hull was white.
But you could be right they could of painted her white aswell.
I'm not sure either,so i can't really correct you if you're wrong LOL.
But i do know this the Oylimpic look outstanding when she was launched.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>I think the Oylimpic was actually made with a white coating<<

Not really. As Kevin stated, that coating was applied for the launching of the ship so it would stand out better in the photos. If you take a look at photos of the ship under construction, you see that the paint applied was much the same coal grey as the Titanic's.

There were a number of reasons for the dark coating. It tended to absorb heat which was welcome on the cold North Atlantic, but mostly, it was much better at hiding dirt, grime and rust. White coatings tended to be (And still are) used on vessels in the tropical cruise trade because it refelects heat. This may not be such a big deal now, but in the days before air conditioning, any ship could become about as comfortable as a Dutch Oven!

The problem with white is that even the smallest amount of dirt tends to stand out.
 
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Alyson Jones

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Yes,i never thought it in that way at all.
You mention the colour being the same as Titanic's,there's a pic of both ships still being constructed and Titanic's hull was black and the Oylimpic's hull was white.I think it was when Oylimpic was near the end of her construction and Titanic was at the start of her construcion.Is it possible they painted the Oylimpic's steal before being constrution?
Maybe that's why i'm confussed.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Is it possible they painted the Oylimpic's steal before being constrution? <<

I don't think so. There's little practical reason to do that although the steel may have been protected by some other coating or even the patina of rust itself. The white was applied just before the ship was launched. If you take a look at photos taken earlier on, you'll notice it's not there.
 
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Alyson Jones

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This is the pic i was talking about,it looks like oylimpic is still being construded while she is white.I'm not sure.

The link won't work sorry.
But if you go to goggle and type in Titanic and Oylimpic's contrution photographs,then go to the first informaton post,there should be a pic of both ships side by side being contruted.
The link won't work i tryed it.
 

Harland Duzen

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Jan 14, 2017
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I currently researching Titanic's Launch, and came across this webpage from the Titanic Belfast website (Link: Titanic Belfast: The man who launched Titanic)

The article then shows this photo from RMS Olympic's launch on October 20 1910 showing the possible launch lever(s) and the man (lucky enough in my opinion) to launch the Olympic Class Ships.

Screen Shot 2017-05-31 at 13.43.27.png

The caption for this photo says:

"...inspecting part of the hydraulic release mechanism connected to the launching trigger and the hydraulic rams beneath the towering hull of Olympic..."

I just want to confirm this, but is one of the these two devices the launch trigger, or does the black pipe running though the photo (I image it ran high pressured water though them to the hydraulic rams at the Bow) lead to the trigger somewhere else such as near the guests boxes.

Any help will be greatly appreciated!
 
Mar 18, 2008
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I just want to confirm this, but is one of the these two devices the launch trigger, or does the black pipe running though the photo (I image it ran high pressured water though them to the hydraulic rams at the Bow) lead to the trigger somewhere else such as near the guests boxes.
It's the pump and pressure gauge which is associated with the launching trigger. The launch trigger is under the ship so to say.

This image might help:

Image260_1.jpg
 
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Aaron_2016

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Anyone know what caused this fatal launch at Belfast in 1939 and if the same procedure for launching the Titanic was used 27 years earlier?





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Rob Lawes

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Formidable was an Illustrious class aircraft carrier. On the day of her launch, a wooden cradle supporting part of the hull collapsed while workman were readying the ship. Flying debris killed one spectator and injured 20 workmen.

For ever after Formidable was known as the ship that launched herself.

As to the similarities between her and the Titanic's launching rig, I've no idea but I would imagine they wouldn't have been too far different.
 

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