Auden G Minor

I am a Titanic enthusiest!
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Sep 8, 2020
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I would like to ask what exploded if it did explode? Testimony like Fredrick Lee said “explosions…after [the ship] had gone down” that were “like a gun-cotton explosion under water at a distance”.
That may be the first of a few testimony accounts, I found this out at this link:
 

Rose F.

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Feb 19, 2021
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I would like to ask what exploded if it did explode? Testimony like Fredrick Lee said “explosions…after [the ship] had gone down” that were “like a gun-cotton explosion under water at a distance”.
That may be the first of a few testimony accounts, I found this out at this link:
What I'm suspecting is that even if she didn't technically implode, the force of water rapidly displacing air, especially if the water pressure compressed the air before it found a way to force itself out, would have been destructive and loud in its own right, but not quite an explosion either, at least in the way we think of it.

I will concede that I am not a naval engineer though, so I wouldn't know the exact mechanisms involved in the matter.
 

Auden G Minor

I am a Titanic enthusiest!
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Sep 8, 2020
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I would like to bring back reference to this video, notice how it tears itself apart towards the outside violently. Sure it may be a submarine, but the similarities are some substantial evidence towards the case the the stern did implode. I am open to criticism.
 

DarrenC

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Dec 27, 2018
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I would like to bring back reference to this video, notice how it tears itself apart towards the outside violently. Sure it may be a submarine, but the similarities are some substantial evidence towards the case the the stern did implode. I am open to criticism.

Hello Auden,

It's been a while since I've posted, but it looks like I started a minor fire storm in this thread and quite by accident. I never thought this idea was controversial; just basic physics.

As you said, Titanic was not a submarine, so I am surprised why you bring up the example of a submarine. That aside, Titanic's hull was not a pressure vessel. It was not designed to withstand any great pressure differential beyond about 1 atmosphere.

Assuming there was air trapped in the stern (probable), the water pressure would have simply squeezed the shell plating until the rivets popped, which wouldn't have taken long. I can't understand how people can accept the idea that striking an iceberg at 22 knots can rupture the seams, but a few atmospheres of pressure differential can not! Do no underestimate pressure.
 
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Auden G Minor

I am a Titanic enthusiest!
Member
Sep 8, 2020
67
53
38
Hello Auden,

It's been a while since I've posted, but it looks like I started a minor fire storm in this thread and quite by accident. I never thought this idea was controversial; just basic physics.

As you said, Titanic was not a submarine, so I am surprised why you bring up the example of a submarine. That aside, Titanic's hull was not a pressure vessel. It was not designed to withstand any great pressure differential beyond about 1 atmosphere.

Assuming there was air trapped in the stern (probable), the water pressure would have simply squeezed the shell plating until the rivets popped, which wouldn't have taken long. I can't understand how people can accept the idea that striking an iceberg at 22 knots can rupture the seams, but a few atmospheres of pressure differential can not! Do no underestimate pressure.
I 100% agree with you.
 
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