Titanic's stern did not implode.


This is the way myths are created. Maybe this, maybe that,...But where is the hard evidence that any implosion took place? Who came up with that conclusion?
 
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This is the way myths are created. Maybe this, maybe that,...But where is the hard evidence that any implosion took place? In case you need to see what an implosion looks like, here is one:
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Titanic, I think, is not comparable to any other ship wreck, she's an anomaly. Multiple things variables during the sinking and the trip to the bottom, did not happen to any other sunken ships.
 

Once the Stern imploded, water passage throughout the ship tore off the First Third and Destroyed Support structures.
 
The gif image I originally tried posting I deleted as it may be under copyright. It showed a tank car imploding after a vacuum was created inside it.
Titanic, I think, is not comparable to any other ship wreck, she's an anomaly
An anomaly that defies physics? Really? She was a ship very much like any other ship built in that period.

Cam, the animation you posted above does not show an implosion as claimed in the video clip. It shows an explosion. During an implosion, things rapidly collapse inward. Things don't go outward. This is the way a lot of nonsense gets out there.

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The gif image I originally tried posting I deleted as it may be under copyright. It showed a tank car imploding after a vacuum was created inside it.

An anomaly that defies physics? Really? She was a ship very much like any other ship built in that period.

Cam, the animation you posted above does not show an implosion as claimed in the video clip. It shows an explosion. During an implosion, things rapidly collapse inward. Things don't go outward. This is the way a lot of nonsense gets out there.

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Hi Sam, hope you're well, been a minute since we've conversed :)

Perhaps the Hull Girder didn't collapse fully yet. Titanic, at least the Stern at this moment, was still half a ship. The water, when the Stern imploded, could've just entered the spaces, and been ejected out by collapsing decks. Our view is blocked by the Hull and Superstructure
 
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Ken Ziemski

Member
Cam, as Darren C put it:
"An underwater implosion occurs when a structure designed to withstand water pressure (ie: a pressure vessel) catastrophically fails." There was no such structures that I'm aware of on Titanic.
What about the food stores , especially the massive refrigeration unit, which was probably 'sealed'? The cork insulation for the unit was witnessed on the water's surface as thousands of small broken bits and pieces. I believe there was some sort of implosion., perhaps several as heard by survivors in the lifeboats.
 
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What about the food stores , especially the massive refrigeration unit, which was probably 'sealed'? The cork insulation for the unit was witnessed on the water's surface as thousands of small broken bits and pieces. I believe there was some sort of implosion., perhaps several as heard by survivors in the lifeboats.
I Agree.
 

Jim Currie

Member
Ken, any "implosion would take place many feet under the surface. The "Explosions" heard by survivors was probably the final failure when the ship girder failed i.e. The sudden fracturing of the sheer strakes -port and starboard - at main deck level due to the tension stress caused by the bending moment.A bit like breaking a dry stick over your knee (don't try it):eek:
 
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Ken, any "implosion would take place many feet under the surface. The "Explosions" heard by survivors was probably the final failure when the ship girder failed i.e. The sudden fracturing of the sheer strakes -port and starboard - at main deck level due to the tension stress caused by the bending moment.A bit like breaking a dry stick over your knee (don't try it):eek:
Yet certain decks hadn’t pancaked.
 

Jim Currie

Member
Yet certain decks hadn’t pancaked.
The decks would not pancake until the keel met resistance on the sea-bed, Cam. When the keel stopped going down, the bits above it tried to follow, They were only temporarily stopped from doing so by the strength of the sides and until first the light frame works in the tween decks failed exerting pressure on the sides and they to failed vertically.
By the way that video you posted earlier of the TV documentary...it seemed (but maybe I missed it) that there seemed to be a Naval Architect missing from the ranks of the "experts" - the only truly knowledgeable person who could visualize and analize the deep water pressure effects on the structure
 
The decks would not pancake until the keel met resistance on the sea-bed, Cam. When the keel stopped going down, the bits above it tried to follow, They were only temporarily stopped from doing so by the strength of the sides and until first the light frame works in the tween decks failed exerting pressure on the sides and they to failed vertically.
By the way that video you posted earlier of the TV documentary...it seemed (but maybe I missed it) that there seemed to be a Naval Architect missing from the ranks of the "experts" - the only truly knowledgeable person who could visualize and analize the deep water pressure effects on the structure
still don't agree, I misworded my statement, but anyhow,

you mean Mr. Paul Henry Nargeolet?
 
The decks would not pancake until the keel met resistance on the sea-bed, Cam. When the keel stopped going down, the bits above it tried to follow, They were only temporarily stopped from doing so by the strength of the sides and until first the light frame works in the tween decks failed exerting pressure on the sides and they to failed vertically.
By the way that video you posted earlier of the TV documentary...it seemed (but maybe I missed it) that there seemed to be a Naval Architect missing from the ranks of the "experts" - the only truly knowledgeable person who could visualize and analize the deep water pressure effects on the structure
I don't believe I'm saying this, but happen to agree with you about this implosion business.
 
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Whether or not any of the spaces in the structure imploded is hard to say. So much damage from just from the ship coming apart...hull plates ripped, boilers coming loose...ect. But I'm sure there were lots of things implodeding from her on her trip the bottom...as in containers, canned goods, bottles of Scotch...:eek:
 
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Whether or not any of the spaces in the structure imploded is hard to say. So much damage from just from the ship coming apart...hull plates ripped, boilers coming loose...ect. But I'm sure there were lots of things implodeding from her on her trip the bottom...as in containers, canned goods, bottles of Scotch...:eek:
thus, bigger things imploded as well.
 
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