Keith H

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I think the weight of the stern section plus the engines {1000 tons each} dragged the stern down quicker than the air had time to escape caused various spaces to implode with water pressure, plus how the forces of the break up occurring were transmitted through the stern part of the ship weakening the structure of it.
 
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Only some nuclear bombs. They're made to first implode and compress a plutonium core to produce a nuclear explosion.
Yes you are right about that. Other ordnance also have an implosion effect in the destructive chain of events. Like the 2nd and 3rd gen nukes it all takes place in micro or milliseconds so you don't see it but its there. Thermobaric weapons with the nickname vacuum bombs is one example. But straying off topic here sort of. I don't believe the stern imploded in the conventional sense. She was just ripped and smashed apart mostly from gravity acting on her and the components inside her. And some fluid dynamics tearing stuff apart on her way to the bottom.
 

Arun Vajpey

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I don't believe the stern imploded in the conventional sense. She was just ripped and smashed apart mostly from gravity acting on her and the components inside her. And some fluid dynamics tearing stuff apart on her way to the bottom.
Agreed. But the forces involved in fluid dynamics tearing things apart are quite the opposite of implosion.
 
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Agreed. But the forces involved in fluid dynamics tearing things apart are quite the opposite of implosion.
No argument there. Somewhere else in this thread or another one I said there might have been some small implosions like canned goods implodeing or maybe a sealed up junction box/wiring trunk ect. But not the stern section itself. There was just to much damage from her ripping apart to have any sealed major compartments. Plus she wasn't built like a submarine. Someone here could could give you better answer I'm sure but above E-deck or so I dont thik you could seal her up even if you wanted to. At least not to the extent that any water pressure at all wouldn't breech her spaces. But I would be happy to be corrected on that if I'm wrong.
 
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Unmittigated nonsense, but makes a good movie. James Cameron is not a sub-sea engineer.
Agree. I liked his movie but he did get some things wrong. Some he even admitted to and later said at least in an around about way he wished didn't put them in. But there are some things he put in that were total fiction that I did like so its all good taken with a grain of salt.
 

Arun Vajpey

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I said there might have been some small implosions like canned goods imploding or maybe a sealed up junction box/wiring trunk ect.
I agree that things like canned goods might have been crushed and perhaps sealed hollow boxes etc might have imploded due to water pressure during the sinking. But even those had to be water tight to start with and remained so till the water pressure outside rose enough to cause the implosion. Otherwise, increasing water pressure would also facilitate seepage into hollow cavities etc and if that happened, implosion would not occur.
 
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Keith H

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The stern section had five water tight bulkheads making four compartments containing large areas and yet looking at the pictures of the wreck most of the shell plating has bulged out wards as if on hitting the sea bed and also the area of the seconded class dining room under the well deck seems to have disappeared .
I feel that damage to the ships structure extended quite a way aft as she broke in half as the sinking took place quite quickly even with water tight doors open their must have been a lot more damage to the bulkheads than realised , and the area of the second class dining room must not only imploded with water pressure but also been a pathway for escaping air forced up by incoming water to have resulted in such damage to occur , its a pity more detailed exploration of the stern section couldn't take place as I am sure it would raise as many questions as answers as to what happened apart from what mystery's and artefacts lie within .
 
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Mike Bull2019

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and the area of the second class dining room must not only imploded with water pressure but also been a pathway for escaping air forced up by incoming water to have resulted in such damage to occur ,

To have imploded, it needed to have been a sealed volume. To be a pathway for escaping air, it had to be open. You can't have it both ways.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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Submarines, especially WW2 and before, were good examples. They were obviously water tight to allow the crew to live and breathe inside and so had maximum depth limitations, beyond which the structural integrity would be compromised due to pressure of water outside. That resulted in leakage of water into the cavity of the submarine but if that did not occur fast enough as the depth increased, implosion could occur. On the other hand, a submarine damaged by - say - a depth charge resulting in a major hull breach would flood quickly resulting in a rapid drop of pressure gradient between outside and inside with eventual early equilibration. In such an instance, implosion cannot and will not occur.
 

Keith H

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To have imploded, it needed to have been a sealed volume. To be a pathway for escaping air, it had to be open. You can't have it both ways.
Looking at the ships drawings there were a lot of refrigerated rooms on G deck and the Orlop deck that by their design would have been air tight if not water tight that could have imploded compromising the internal ships structure in doing so , also releasing air that caused air pockets leading to cause more "mini " implosions as the water pressure increased with depth , i think quite a maelstrom of things going on at once in those areas of the ship.
 

Mike Bull2019

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Those rooms would not have been air tight in the same way as a pressure vessel is, so would not have 'imploded' (though I'm sure there was all manner of destructive hell going on down there as water rapidly flooded in and air was rapidly forced out).
 
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Arun Vajpey

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I'm sure there was all manner of destructive hell going on down there as water rapidly flooded in and air was rapidly forced out
Definitely. But that process would not cause an implosion. Bit of an explosive effect perhaps if the air was being forced out very rapidly, but definitely not an implosion.

Even small, relatively fragile items like Major Peuchen's tin box (with those bonds in it) would not be water tight and so would flood along with the surrounding room.
 

Jörg Thesing

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Hello friends,

in my opinion, the rear of the titanic has not imploded as a whole. As noted in some of the comments here, many negative forces have caused the structure to fail. The physical forces, pressure, current, speed, mass, did not work evenly when the stern was sinking and thus with the great potential for damage.
Another factor is the high flow speed of the water. The inflowing water had significantly more attack surfaces at the stern than at the bow. The front part of the titanic sank over the bow in a streamlined manner and hit the sea floor at an angle, where by the kinking bow was able to absorb a large part of the impact energy and the other hull lay more gently on the sea floor and the damage from the impact was limited.
The stern hit the seabed with a larger hull area and enormous impact energy, perhaps faster than the front part, which more or less pushed the decks down and displaced water to the outside, which can take place due to the pressure equalization that existed there again.
At a pressure of 5500 psi at a depth of approx. 3800 meters, there will be no more air in it when the wreck is reached. Under these enormous pressures, every bit of air looks for the smallest gaps well in advance in order to escape at these points with a high potential for destruction.
I think we can all only imagine to a very limited extent how huge the effects on structure and material really are in such an event and it is best to use small comparisons to explain ...

If you hold your hand out the window while driving a car at 60 mph, you will notice how great the power of the air is. If it were water at the speed, the hand would be destroyed immediately.

(written with google translator)

Best regards and stay safe;)

Jörg
 
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Keith H

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All this depends on the speed of decent of the stern , at 10 metres the water pressure would be 30 pounds per square inch and at 30 metres would be approx. 60 pounds per square inch , so if the stern sank faster than the water could flood in and air to escape from compartments then the compartment would be subject to pressure that would cause an implosion .although the refrigerated rooms were not built as a pressure vessel by their basic design would have some form of airtightness to enable efficient chilling and in a rapid decent situation would soon be below the water faster than they can flood or air can escape giving a implode situation .also the doors to these rooms open outwards so any water building up on the outside of these rooms would force the doors shut against the rising pressure of water.
 
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Mike Bull2019

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We've done this topic round and around and around...air in compartments would be swiftly compressed/forced out, it would not 'implode'. An implosion is an instantaneous event that occurs when an absolutely airtight vessel is overwhelmed by pressure; something like a refrigerator compartment would have at most been crushed over a few seconds as pressure mounted- IF they were that airtight, which I doubt they were.

Now, the fantail, everything aft of the rudder, would have had a lot of trapped air and might have 'imploded'...it was the very last section to go under after all and would have gone down very rapidly...except, it is still the most intact part of the whole stern section. Almost as if the air was quickly compressed and forced out instead...

Watch the famous video of the Oceanos sinking- there are plumes of spray coming out of it as it finally goes under, caused by air being forced out before it has even submerged. (From about six minutes on)

 
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Do we think that because the hull of Titanic was structurally unsound after the break-up that that may have contributed to the possible implosion.

Honestly, I think that the stern section imploded not as violently as in the James Cameron video but I think that it happened. And that when the stirn hit the sea bed, she broke apart into what she looks like now because of the weekend structure from the breakup, and the minor implosion, the decent and the hydraulic downburst effect.

That's just a there tho. Tell me what y'all think!
 

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