Titanic's woodwork during break


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Nick Lavenice

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Feb 22, 2004
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Hi everyone! I had recently gone to Halifax, Nova Scotia where I visited the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. While I walked around I noticed that there was only around a dozen or more pieces of woodwork from the Titanic. Why is that? I mean, there was plenty of wood in the area where it broke up (such as the aft grand staircase, lounge, cabins, and possibly pieces of the smoking room). so why so little recovered. Is it possible that there was a lot of wood recovered, but was not donated to any museum’s such as the one in Halifax (example the two brothers that found the second only known Deck Chair). Any thoughts?

Nick
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Back in 1912 nobody could have predicted (or understood) that in 100 years anybody might be asking a question such as this one. At that time whatever remained of the Titanic had no historic significance, certainly no financial value, and was seen only as worthless wreckage of a disaster which everybody would prefer to forget. A few bits and pieces were fished out as morbid curios and souvenirs by crew members of the ships sent out to recover bodies, but other than that there was no motivation to go anywhere near the wreckage. Indeed, most other ships went out of their way to avoid it.
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