Titans


Status
Not open for further replies.
Sep 4, 2007
29
0
81
Titanic has so many ironies which make it a spooky story. One of the most flamboyant ones is this one, printed in an editorial in the Belfast Morning News, on June 1st, 1911 (A year before!!):

"It is difficult to understand why the owners and builders named this ship Titanic. The Titans were a mythological race who came to believe they'd conquered nature, who thought they'd achieved power and learning greater than Zeus himself, to their ultimate ruin. He smote the strong and daring Titans with thunderbolts; and their final abiding place was in some limbo beneath the lowest depths of the Tartarus, a sunless abyss below Hades."
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,666
881
563
Easley South Carolina
The misgivings are understandable as this was a very superstitious age. Still, the name Titanic was applied to a late 20th century tanker and she survived to reach the scrapyard after a long career. Olympic had some problems during her lifetime but nothing above and beyond the call of unusual. Britannic went on to be applied to another liner which survived up to 1960. In light of that, I would say the misgivings over the names are...exaggerated.
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
I always thought Morgan Robertson's Futility (1898) was spooky when it told the fictional story of the wreck of the Titan which as we all know was a brand new Luxury liner the was deemed unsinkable only to sink in April. He also wrote Beyond the Spectrum a story about a fictional war between America and Japan in 1914. Where Japan attacks Hawaii and are stopped by an ultraviolet searchlight which bears a resemblance to the atomic bomb. Was Morgan Robertson psychic or just have one too many coincidences.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Aug 20, 2000
8,239
29
398
Niagara Falls, Ontario
Hi George,

quote:

Was Morgan Robertson psychic or just have one too many coincidences.

I would say it's the latter. While there are some similarities between the Titan and Titanic, a lot more differences are present. Just as Michael stated that the misgivings are exaggerated, the same reason applies here.​
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
Morgan Robertson was a professional seaman. He knew what went on on the North Atlantic and knew the practices of the time would end in tears.

His book was slightly altered in 1912 to make Titan more like Titanic.
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Dave and Jason,

I knew it was altered. There are lot of differences between the two ships. I didn't know Robertson had been a sailor though. Have both of you heard of Beyond the Spectrum. In this book, he described a futuristic war fought with aircraft that carried what he called "sun bombs". These bombs were so powerful that with one brilliant flash of blinding light, one single bomb could destroy an entire city (much like a nuclear bomb ). When this book was written, airplanes were still tiny, dangerous machines that could barely carry one man, and crashed frequently, and this was decades before the Germans started their "heavy water" experiments, trying to construct a nuclear device.

Robertson's future war begins in the month of December (much like the actual WW II, which began in December) when the Japanese stage a sneak attack on Hawaii. (WW II was started when the Japanese launched a sneak attack on an American base -Pearl Harbor, in Hawaii. This man is an unknown Edgar Cayce.
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Jason you should. It's told in the penny dreadful style but is a great science fiction story.

I'm sorry It's wrong of me to assume you both had heard of Beyond the Spectrum so I edited my post. I meant have either of you heard of Beyond the Spectrum

I could see Robertson hitting gold with Titanic but writing a novel about a war with Japan thirty years before it happened and the weapon he describes does have a resemblance to the atom bomb. I just always wondered about Robertson's supposedly being able to tell the future. If I had such a power I'd not be talking about it. I'd be writing books like he did. Assuming he had such a power. I just find Morgan Robertson's ability to write novels that bear an uncanny resemblance to events that unfold later on passing strange is all and there for Spooky.
sad.gif
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Actually I think Robertson's Futility and Beyond the Spectrum were republished about ten years ago after Cameron's Titanic was released. Actually anything about Titanic was re published or published when Titanic came out.
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,666
881
563
Easley South Carolina
>>Was Morgan Robertson psychic or just have one too many coincidences.<<

No, and he never pretended to be. As Dave said, the man was a prefessional seaman and it didn't take any special precience to see where the trends were going. The lifeboat question was already out there and the Olympics were designed with an ample margin for growth to take into account the new regulations that some could see were coming.

There was still that issue of "Cracking On" in all conditions save poor visibility, and sometimes, not even slowing for that. When everybody is taking shortcuts and driving with the pedal to the metal no matter what, it doesn't take Jimmy Nuetron Boy Genius to see that "Business as Usual" was an accident waiting to happen.
 

Will C. White

Member
Apr 18, 2007
267
2
123
We must also note men such as Verne and Wells; many writers seem to have a vision of the future that comes to pass, but is it their imaginations driving actual development? Who had ever heard of nanotechnology until Star Trek? Very few, I would think. Just another 2 cents worth.
 
May 3, 2005
2,599
291
278
>>Still, the name Titanic was applied to a late 20th century tanker and she survived to reach the scrapyard after a long career. <<

There was also a U.S. Navy cargo ship, U.S.S. Titania (a near miss with Titanic ?) AKA-13 (wonder if that hull number caused any problems with the superstitious sailors ?) However the name "Titania" is listed as "One of the moons of the planet Uranus."
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
The tanker called Titanic was originally called Daugavils. Her name was changed when she changed owners.

I think the Jews call this chutzpah!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.