Totals on deaths - Survivors 1st 2nd 3rd class crew


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David Hennessey

Guest
I am wondering why every book has a different story on the number of people on Titanic. If they were 1st, 2nd, 3rd Class, if they were children, if they were crew.What is the most current info?. The numbers change in every book. Can anyone give the accurate info? Thank you.
 
Apr 25, 2001
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Dear David. The reason is that nobody has bothered to actually count, probably because there have been too few reliable sources available. If one goes to the Public Record Office, the crew lists are easily available, and all of the 885 crewmembers are clearly listed. Also, the 212 surviving crewmembers all signed off and got paid, giving the exact number of crewmen on the ship, and this means we know how many crewmembers there were, surviving as well as those lost. In this number, the musicians and postmen are not included. The Harland and Wolff people were also considered passengers and not listed as crew.
As for the passengers, there are ticket lists and White Star Line passenger lists and also the American Senate passenger list. If one cross-checks these sources one soon finds out how many passengers there were on the ship. The survivors are listed in the recently discovered Carpathia list of surviving passengers from the Titanic as well as in the American Senate list (that misses a few), the White Star Line passenger list, the Red Cross lists of passengers given monetary assistance and also newspaper articles covering the survivors. There can be very little doubt that there were 1 309 passengers on the ship, 500 of whom survived. They are all counted and checked. Additionally, there were five postmen and eight musicians, all of whom lost their lives. The grand total is therefore 2 207, 712 of whom survived.
Most of the authors of Titanic books have probably not had access to these sources, and have thus just noted the American Senate numbers, the British Board of Trade figures or Captain Rostron's figure of 705 survivors (even though Rostron actually said in the British enquiry that the purser had a list of six additional survivors, i e 711, very close to the 712 named survivors in existence).

Best regards,

Peter
 
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David Hennessey

Guest
Dear Peter Thank you for the information. May I please bother you one more time and ask, if you have the passenger number break down by class, male female, adult,and separately for children? Also, if the "crew" (or employees on ship) female number is accurate for 23 on board and 21 survived? This is for a school project to give accurate info, and maybe some graphs. I did not realize how much info is out there to go through. I don't want to waste your time, just if you have it. I am not a regular research person. I just have books from the libraray and book store. Thank you for your help. David
 
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David Hennessey

Guest
Dear Peter Thank you for the information. May I please bother you one more time and ask, if you have the passenger number break down by class, male female, adult,and separately for children? Also, if the "crew" (or employees on ship) female number is accurate for 23 on board and 21 survived? This is for a school project to give accurate info, and maybe some graphs. I did not realize how much info is out there to go through. I don't want to waste your time, just if you have it. I am not a regular research person. I just have books from the libraray and book store. Thank you for your help. David
 
Apr 25, 2001
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Dear David, I think you find the figures you are looking for here on Philip's excellent site. The number of female employees was 23, 20 of whom survived; three were lost. They were Mrs Wallis (matron, listed together with the second class stewards, not third class, interestingly enough), Mrs Snape (listed as a second class stewardess) and finally Miss Walsh (first class stewardess).

Best regards,

Peter
 
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Daniel Rosenshine (Danielr)

Guest
I have been doing some research into first class, and my conclusion is that there were 323 passengers, one extra one was upgraded from second class thus giving a total of 324. Although Captain Rostron counted 202 1st class survivours, I could only find 201. This leaves 123 casualties, 5 of which were women and 118 men. None of the women were recovered, but 35 1st class male bodies were. Also an additional 2 bodies were from lifeboats, the body of Mr Hoyt, and Mr Beattie. Thus 37 casualties are accounted for. The rest 86 including the 5 females are not accounted for, or not identified as first class passenger.

Daniel.
 

Mike Herbold

Member
Feb 13, 2001
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This is from the book "Titanic, Belfast's Own" by Stephen Cameron (page 24):

"The records show that of the eight fatal accidents on the Titanic, six were in the shipyard and two in the works. Following detailed research I have been able to positively identify five of the eight men who died whilst working on the Titanic. Should not their names be remembered along with those of the many who were to perish when the ship sank?
On 20 April 1910, Samuel J. Scott, a catch-boy, aged fifteen, from Templemore Street, Belfast, died from a fractured skull after he fell from a ladder on the staging.
On 23 June 1910, John Kelly, a heater-boy, aged nineteen, from Convention Street, Belfast, died from shock after falling from the slipway onto the ground.
On 5 November 1910, William Clarke, a driller, aged twenty-seven, from Coulter Street, Belfast, fell from staging; he died two days later, on 7 November.
On 31 May 1911, James Dobbin, a shipwright from Merret Street, Belfast, was injured during the launch of the Titanic when he was crushed under falling timber; he died on 1 June.
On 13 June 1911, Robert James Murphy, a rivet-counter from Hillman Street, Belfast, died from a fractured skull after the staging he was standing on collapsed and he fell 30 feet. His son, Robert Murphy Junior, died during the construction of the Olympic."
 
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Janice D. Shellenbarger

Guest
As far as the "Women & Children first" theory, did First Class men follow through on this with the Second and Third Class passengers? My belief is that they may have put their own families first, but probably were not too concerned if the lower classes survived. Is there any research on this topic?
 
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Stefanie Eisenbeis

Guest
My question is about Mrs. Henry Sleeper Harper. I'd really like to know more about her life and what she did before and after the sinking. I could only find a short paragraph about her and I could really use this information for my English project. If anyone can help me or tell me sources I can use to find information myself, I'd really appreciate it. Sincerely Stefanie
 

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