Tourist Third Class


James Doyle

Member
Jul 30, 2002
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I recently found out that a fourth class was added on the Olympic in 1927 known as Tourist Third Class, and that new public rooms were created for this class. Does anyone have any pictures or information on this class?
 
B

Brian R Peterson

Guest
James,

There was no "Forth Class" on Olympic or new public rooms.

In 1928 members of the Atlantic Conference agreed to have Second and Third Class eliminated, thus leaving First Class and Tourist Class - this sensible arrangement has remained in effect both afloat and aloft to the present day.

Best Regards,

Brian
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi James,

I'm in a bit of a 'shameless self-promotional mood', so I'll reference my 'RMS Olympic: Titanic's Sister' (Tempus; 2004), or for a more concise description of the changes of 1927-28-29 see my 'Olympic Class Ships' book (Tempus; 2004), the 2006 reprint. There's a fair bit of information about the new arrangements, and the new public rooms constructed near the bow on D-deck [1911 lettering]. The original third class rooms beneath the poop became tourist class for a time, while the new rooms were for third class. There may be some pictures online, there are some in my Olympic book.

Or, you could view the Poderjay article on my website (in pdf. form) where it provides a glimpse of the original second class dining room as it appeared on a 1931 deckplan.

Hi Brian,

Much as I hate to say it, just about everything you've written is wrong. May I ask the source?

There was no "Forth Class" on Olympic or new public rooms.
As I have indicated above, among a number of other changes some new third class public rooms were constructed on D-deck, near the bow; while some original second class staterooms aft on D-deck were removed and replaced with a tourist class dining room/dancefloor/public space (take your pick of the label!) These were installed over the 1927-28 refit. There was no 'fourth class' in the sense of the name, but there were four classes of passenger.

In 1928 members of the Atlantic Conference agreed to have Second and Third Class eliminated, thus leaving First Class and Tourist Class - this sensible arrangement has remained in effect both afloat and aloft to the present day.

I'm not sure where that comes from. Third class was never eliminated on Olympic, nor on other vessels of her ilk. After the 1927-28 refit, Olympic carried first, second, tourist third and third class passengers -- four classes. However, in February 1928 her registered capacities (see the British registry) were amended to first, tourist and third (lumping second and tourist third together), which has led to some mistaken statements that second class disappeared from Olympic entirely in 1928. (A mistake I once made myself, and have sought to correct.)

In truth, the Atlantic Conference shows Olympic carried tourist third class passengers along with second class from 1928 onwards. This only ceased near the end of 1931, when no second class passengers were shown and only first, tourist and third class passengers were carried by Olympic. In every year from 1926-29, Olympic's average passenger lists rose -- and the tourist third cabin passengers were a key part of that improvement.

All of first class rooms on E-deck [1911 lettering] became tourist class in the early 1930s. Indeed, the June 1934 first class accommodation plans for Olympic do not show E-deck [1911 lettering] at all, as these rooms were now designated 'tourist' class. Advertisements were keen to point out that these rooms had formerly been first class, and they stated that they had been considerably improved, yet there were now a number of tourist class rooms with their own private facilities. In spite of all these improvements, the severe decline in passenger traffic in the early 1930s hindered any improvement in passenger lists; on the other hand, a significant proportion of even tourist class passengers now had private bathroom facilities.

Best wishes,

Mark.
 

john stewart

Member
Nov 11, 2018
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0
11
James,

There was no "Forth Class" on Olympic or new public rooms.

In 1928 members of the Atlantic Conference agreed to have Second and Third Class eliminated, thus leaving First Class and Tourist Class - this sensible arrangement has remained in effect both afloat and aloft to the present day.

Best Regards,

Brian
There was technically a fourth class but 3rd class and second was merged to make tourist third class
 

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