Transnational Crime in 1912


Kas01

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We all know about the Navratil case aboard the Titanic, but what was the normal scenario for transnational crime in 1912?
 

Arun Vajpey

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As far as Michel Navratil Sr was concerned, I would not call him a criminal although the law books would probably say so. It is clear that he loved his sons and might have had reasons to consider that Marcelle was a poor mother. As I have mentioned elsewhere, if I had a chance so save ONE person (who was lost) from the Titanic, it would be Michel Navratil. If he had survived, I believe he would have successfully 'disappeared' to a good life with his sons in America despite the Titanic's infamy that followed.
 
Nov 14, 2005
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I don't think there was any normal scenario at all. Kidnapping, flight to avoid prosecution, fraud, robbery, even murder. You name it, it happened.
As for the international aspect of it...yeah probably flight was the bulk of it. The seeds of the mafia were being planted at that time so there was that part of international crime getting started. It was not like today where everything is connected..hence the need for interpol and the like. I guess it could be argued that the biggest international crimes going on were nations against nations...good old fashioned imperialism.
 
Dec 27, 2017
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And lets not forget Dr Crippen. The first criminal caught using wireless telegraphy. Fleeing in the SS Montrose, he was identified by the Captain who radioed his suspicions back to Scotland Yard. Chief Inspector Walter Dew caught the faster White Star liner SS Laurentic and was waiting to arrest Crippen on his arrival.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Legend has it that the Captain's suspicions arose not because of anything Crippen himself said or did but by the odd behaviour of his girlfriend Ethel de Neve, who was masquerading as a teenage boy during the voyage. Apparently, someone noticed that during a deck game, the 'boy' repeatedly threw legs apart while catching a ball on a sitting position, something that men almost never and women usually do (the normal protective reflex in men is to bring knees together if something is dropped onto the lap without warning)
 

Mark Baber

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Nov 14, 2005
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Interesting thread. Thanks. I had not heard of it before (the case). Must have been like the OJ trial of its day. Not the outcome but the press and public interest. Will go check it out more.
 

Aly Jones

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My guess is that fleeing criminals got away with it more back in those days because there wasn't any ID cards or any other safety requirements apart from the ships manifest. Apparently, so many people travelled under false, fake, names back in those days. Something no one can do today.
It seems like we have more crimes and criminals today but that's because so many them get caught, where as, so many criminals back then got away with it. Jack the ripper was one of them.
 
Nov 14, 2005
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Yes what you say is pretty much true Aly. But also there are a lot more things today that criminals can take advantage of today that didn't exist in 1912. But as I stated in another thread it was not that long that one could simply walk up to a depature gate at the airport, pay cash if a seat was open and get on the plane and go. As for Jack the Ripper, many of the slueths today are convinced that he escaped to America back in those days when it was easy to do so.
 

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