Trimmer George Green


Jul 22, 2001
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kent uk
Hello. I recently did some research at my local archives and happened upon a death notice in a local paper for 1912 regarding the death of George Green. It stated that his brother T green of paddock wood kent had sadly lost his brother in the sinking of the Titanic. I don't know Mr Greens age so I am unable to trace him on any census. I wondered if anyone else knew any more about him?
Emma
 
D

Dawn Hughes

Guest
Hi Emma
looking in one of my books, I have found Mr. George Green who died that night. He was a trimmer in engineering and his residence was given as Southampton. No other information is given in the book I have. It doesn't give any age at all.
However, there is also a passenger (3rd class) listed. Mr. George H. Green aged 40 years from Surrey, England. He died too and was going to Lead City, CT, USA. Don't know which one is your Mr. Green. hope this is helpful
regards
Dawn
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Afternoon Dawn and Emma,

The passenger George Green - the notes about him are also with the notes I have on Henry Spinner and I can't find the buggers anywhere. As far as I can recall, George was from Dorking in Surrey, was aged 40 and was married to a Teresa Green (yes, they are!) of Spon End, Coventry. I think he had 4 daughters. George's family travelled with him as far as (can't remember - aaarrrggghhh!!!) where they split off and joined his family in Surrey while he carried on down to Southampton to board the Titanic.

As soon as I can find these very elusive notes, I can answer your questions on Spinner and Green.

Cheers,

Boz
 
Jul 22, 2001
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kent uk
Hi to you both and thanks for the information.
I should have added that the notice was under the local village news section and I think it was under Ringmer Village. I wrote down what the article said but forgot to write which village it came from. Ringmer is a small village not too far from Brighton. I am returning to the record office on thursday so I shall check. There was no mention of a wife or family left behind.
emma
happy.gif
 

Brian Meister

Member
Mar 1, 2001
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Dear Emma,

As Iain has stated, there were two men named
George Green aboard Titanic: the second-class
passenger, and a young trimmer, 20 years old.
The younger man had sailed aboard the Olympic
before the Titanic and was the son of Joseph
and Mary Jane Green. He was born in Southampton
joining several siblings.
As you know, both men were lost in the
sinking.
The man described in the death notice was
George Green, the passenger.

Regards,

Brian
 
Jul 22, 2001
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kent uk
Hi Brian

I shall try and look into this more in the future, I think it is interesting that Mr Greens brother placed the notice and omitted to mention his surviving family. I wonder what became of them. Maybe I can find them over on the Ellis Island site. Anyway as I live in the general area maybe I will find out what the connection to this small village is.

Iain - I just re-read your post and got the joke (eventually!) better late than never eh? haha

Emma
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Found them notes.

George Green, 40, of Dorking, Surrey, was a furrier on his way to Lead City, South Dakota, with friends to better his position. He was married to Teresa Green of 170 Spon Street, Coventry. His family - wife and 3 daughters, Hilda, 9, Kathleen, 6 and Olive, 4 - travelled with George as far as Reading station, Berkshire.

Cheers,

Boz
 
Jul 22, 2001
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kent uk
Hi Iain,

Thanks for taking the trouble to post your notes. I haven't managed to find out why the notice was posted in the newspaper for this tiny little village though.

Best wishes,
Emma
 
C

Cáit Grant

Guest
I am sorry to show my ignorance but can you tell me what a Trimmer as in Lamp Trimmer Deck Crew, did? I take it that the lamp trimmer did "exactly what it says on the tin". That was to trim the oil lamp wicks. I take it that there was no electricity ?

My relation was Samuel Ernest Hemming. Lamp trimmer.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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UK
The Titanic was electrically lit, but oil was still the best option for portable lighting. The battery-powered electric torches and hand lamps available in 1912 were not capable of delivering a continuous light for more than a few minutes. Neither were they suited to use on deck, as the occasional appearance of a bright beam from a 'flash' light could dazzle other crewmen on watch.

The ship therefore carried a supply of portable colza oil lamps, and one of the seamen was appointed as 'lamp trimmer' to maintain them ready for use on the ship or in its lifeboats. That was Samuel Hemming's particular responsibility, but it might not have occupied all his time. His actions 'on the night' certainly confirmed his general experience as a seaman.
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