Twisting

Scott Mills

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Jul 10, 2008
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Yes, it seems like it, but there are also many variables. There are several ways it could of happened.
Of course, but as it goes, as we refine what we know from the wreck the number of 'ways it could have happened' should narrow considerably. For example, once it was determined that the v-split model was impossible, it seems to my non-engineering brain that we can now narrow the possibilities and eliminate variables.

Hell, with some of the modelling that I read about in physics departments and the state of computing these days, part of me wants to believe that a computational model should be able to back solve towards the original, non-broken state, and give us a list of potential explanations in reverse.
 

R.M.S TITANIC

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Mar 7, 2016
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Hmm... I never thought of that. But do we have any survivor accounts that suggest the Titanic was twisting?
 

Scott Mills

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Jul 10, 2008
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Hmm... I never thought of that. But do we have any survivor accounts that suggest the Titanic was twisting?
We don't--necessarily; however, it seems to me that the rapid changing of the list of Titanic immediately before the 'plunge' and 'wave' that washes over the bridge and the men struggling with the collapsible boats on the officer's quarters, just might indirectly point to Titanic's hull 'twisting.'
 

Bill Vanek

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Jul 22, 2019
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So looking at the barber pole, and the annotated side view blueprint, it looks like Titanic actually split between the second and third funnels rather than between the 3rd and the 4th funnel.

There is some deep perturbation in my brain when I think about the breakup, because it seems prima facie that this should be a very straight forward engineering problem. In other words, it seems that someone (who is definitely not me), should be able to take what we know about the wreck and the location of the hull split, and then be able to get some computer time to do modelling, and that math could be applied to get a pretty precise picture of how Titanic's hull split, and why it split.
There have been several calculations. Here are two pics of things that I've seen. That fellow R.M.S. Titanic is correct in saying that there are a lot of variables to consider if someone tries to model the ship exactly, so only these basic models (that is, basic beam calculations) have been used. And that is why I steered clear of actual quantitative theorizing, and stuck with qualitative only, stating what the stress state would be, why and how and where it broke, so as to align with the reliable witnesses and the debris field.
 

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Bill Vanek

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Jul 22, 2019
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North Carolina USA
That is a big barber pole.
But, that is where it roughly was.
Here are some comparisons that will help you see how much of the ship got wrecked. The reason that "MOD" is in the file name of the one pic is that I re-scaled it compared to the original. The original had several places of misalignment of the bow photo mosiac (blue) with the plan (grey). I got the fit a bit closer.
 

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Scott Mills

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There have been several calculations. Here are two pics of things that I've seen. That fellow R.M.S. Titanic is correct in saying that there are a lot of variables to consider if someone tries to model the ship exactly, so only these basic models (that is, basic beam calculations) have been used. And that is why I steered clear of actual quantitative theorizing, and stuck with qualitative only, stating what the stress state would be, why and how and where it broke, so as to align with the reliable witnesses and the debris field.
Bill,

Great post! Thank you for these.

Obviously I am no engineer, but in the back of my head I think I had been assuming that the actual break-up occurred at a much more shallow angle, and that the sudden "surge" downward reported by the men struggling with the collapsible boats occurred when it did because the bow had partially separated from its buoyancy--the dry stern.

I am not sure that was even possible though now that I think about where the break actually occurred.