Two or Three Lusitania Books to Recommend


May 1, 2004
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Pacifique du Nord
In the mid 1960s, in Hicksville, Long Island, New York, I purchased a paperback called "The Day They Sank The Lusitania." My mother was rather taken aback that I would be reading such serious literature.

I've neglected the Lusitania in favour of the Oly. class liners. Can anybody suggest two or three books about the history of the Lusi. that dwell not only on her 18-minutes of infamy, but the whole story?

I'd just like some info. on the Luci. and the Maury 'coz these vessels really started the concept of the 'superliner.'

WSL was just trying to say Mine's bigger than yours, if you know what I mean. A p*ssing contest involving untold millions, but schoolboy games of bluff and bravery just the same...
 

rob scott

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May 4, 2004
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suggest:
The Lusitania Story, Mitch Peeke et al.
see this review:
http://www.hellfire-corner.demon.co.uk/reviewlusitania.htm

I haven't seen this yet but like the part of it including ship's design and early years of operation, etc. - sounds like what you (and I) want - it's by the Lusitania Online guys

(too bad my library hasn't it yet)
but I think I'll order it from walmart online, best price-
 
Sep 22, 2003
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Coatesville, PA
Yes here are 3 book which focus on more than just the Lusitania's Sinking.

The Lusitania Story, Mitch Peeke
Lusitania: Triumph Of The Edwardian Age, Eric Sauder
"Lusitania" Mark Warren
Express Liners Lusitania and Mauretania, Ocean Liners of The Past Vol 2
 
May 12, 2005
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"...A p*ssing contest ..."

Oh please don't say that around here or little uptight gremlins will jump out and get you!
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I have read Triumph of the Edwardian Age - it's great and has marvelous pictures. The Ballard book is good, too, for visuals as they came mostly from the Sauder collection. I don't think the ultimate Lusi book has been written yet.
 

Omar Khokhar

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Aug 27, 2008
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I`ve read The Lusitania Story by Mitch Peeke. The only thing i liked about the book was the introduction and chapter 1. The rest of the book relies a lot on Colin Simpson i.e the lusitania was carrying gun cotten
 
M

Michael Bezek

Guest
My votes for the 3 best Lusitania books-
1)Last Voyage of the Lusitania by A.A. and Mary Hoehling-the classic account.
2)Lusitania:An Epic Tragedy by Diana Preston-Does a good job of putting the sinking into the political context of the time, and especially of the Anglo-German naval rivalry that was a contributing factor to the start of World War I.
3)Seven Days to Disaster-A very well written book, that provides some interesting background information on Capt. Turner. I read it when it first came out in the 80's, but it seems to have disappeared, not only is it out of print-I can't find a used copy anywhere, either!

AND-one to avoid-Lusitania by Colin Simpson. Only for conspiracy nuts who think Elvis was whisked away to the planet of the dinosaurs by a UFO piloted by JFK. Not only are Simpson's theories insane, but his talent as a writer is non-existent.
 
Sep 22, 2003
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The Best Lusitania Books? Well Thats a Different Story There for me.

Written Best Would be:

1.Charles E. Lauriat, The Lusitania's Last Voyage. A nice Little Passanger Account.
2.Hickey & Smith, Seven Days to Disaster. Not the Most Accurate book by far, but great to read.
3.Daniel A. Butler, The Lusitania. An Interesting book thats very controversial, though also well written.

Most Accurate:

1. Bailey & Ryan, The Lusitania Diaster. The Book w/ Non Stop Criticism of Simpson and also the most accurate book written so far.
2.David Ramsay, Lusitania: Saga & Myth. 2nd only to Bailey & Ryan
Patrick O'Sullivan, The lusitania: Unravelling the Mysteries. A very good book, also very controversial, though Accurate for the most part.

As for Simpson's Book. Well That Depends on Whether or not Your Simpsonite, Conservative, or Moderate. One Good Example of A simpsonite would be Mitch Peeke Where he praises Simpson and Criticises Bailey & Ryan in his Book "Lusitania and Beyond. Eric Has already Admitted to being Conservative, so no reason to explore there. and Moderates would be David Ramsay and Patrick O'Sullivan, the people who are somewhere inbetween.
 
May 3, 2002
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What would a radical approach involve? Conversely What constitutes a "conservative" approach. As a mode of Historiography it warrants definition. I appreciate that you and Eric have crossed swords but history and its study should be bigger than personal differences. We all have our places within the study of the Lusitania.

I would love to get my hands on Bailey and Ryan's book. One thing i like about Preston is that the style gives my cinematic imagination good material to see the story in my mind as if viewing a film.

cheers

Martin


Martin
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Eric Has already Admitted to being Conservative, so no reason to explore there<<

I don't see what that has to do with anything. From what I've seen of Eric Sauder's work, his approach is that of a thorough and meticulous "Just-The-Facts-Ma'am" sort of historian that has nothing to do with political lables.
 
Sep 22, 2003
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I'll Agree w/ that Standart. Besides, conservative isn't just a label for Politicians. It's A label that can be used just about anywhere. here are some nice Examples. Historians, Navigators, Economist, Architects, Designers, Artist, Poets. And I didn't put an of those labels on Eric, I simply said he was conservative and Left it to that. So I see no reason to Discuss this further here, anyone who wants to can send me private message or look up my cantact info in my profile.
 

rob scott

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May 4, 2004
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yes, but,
original question was more to the angle of:
about the ship herself besides all the mystery and controversy, about the ship details and fittings and features and accommodations and passenger experience sailing with her....
so I expect, not having read it yet, that The Lusitania Story may be fairly close? high percentage?
any other good books serving this angle?
*Before the 'tragedy' ?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Besides, conservative isn't just a label for Politicians. It's A label that can be used just about anywhere.<<

Yes it can...and like any lable, it's both notoriously slippery in it's meaning and can...as often as not...be used as some sort of slam against somebody who expresses a viewpoint one doesn't like. I realize you may noit have meant it in a derogatory sense, but that's how it can be taken. That's why it's wise to avoid any such. Personally, I don't care about or for such things. My questions regarding anything historical are;

a)What are the statements/conclusions/claims being made and,
b)What is the evidence to support same.

The rest is simply misdirection, and best avoided.
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Sep 22, 2003
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Agreed. Though Everyone will always have they're interpretation of things, so the story is always coming out from different angles. All the Angles and Evidence should therefore be examined taken full advantage of.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Apr 21, 2009
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I think Des Hickey & Gus Smith's "7 Days to Disaster" is by some distance the best written book on the Lusitania disaster. Fortunately, I have a good hardcover copy but it is not easy to find.

A few years ago, I spoke to Gus Smith on the phone while doing some research on Lusitania survivor Julia Sullivan.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Thanks, Martin. I just dropped 400 pages of manuscript into Phil Hind's lap. I need to get the photos we are going to use loaded and....hopefully...by early summer the series will be concluded.

The best book, odd to say, was a mass market paperback in the 1960s which had tons of great accounts. Hoehling was excellent, too.
 
May 3, 2002
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Thanks Jim, I'm looking forward to seeing and reading the concluding part of that "magnum opus"

I would have mentioned Hoehling but only had three options. Hoehling is very good but the one minus is that it subscribes to the Titanic Nosedive narrative when describing the final moments of the ship.

What was the name of the "mass market '60s' paperback"?

thanks

Martin
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Thanks, Martin.

Basically, neither myself nor Mike were ever entirely happy with parts one or two. A TON of new material surfaced between 2005 and Jan. 2008, when we dusted the project off. So, parts one and two were shortened, extensively rewritten, corrected in a few spots, and over 300 pages of new material added. In addition to myself and Mike, Cliff Barry and Peter Kelly both wrote sections. Geoff Whitfield contributed something that still has me going "wow!" Eric Longo re-created a 1907 autochrome for the piece. Harald Advokaat did two painting. Several other ET members have contributed photos or research tips.

Jason Schleisman spent the equivalent of eight months working closely with me (and survived!
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) as a brutally honest, but correct 99% of the time, editor. The end result reflects him as much as it does the rest of us.

I guess that what I am building towards is that this has been an ET "in house" project, and I look forward to seeing it presented later this summer.
 
Feb 6, 2009
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I was lucky enough to pick up a copy of Seven Days to Disaster at my local book exchange. It's in my pile to read. I'm glad it's been highly recommended.
 

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