Ulster Folk and Transport Museum


Sam Brannigan

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Feb 24, 2007
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Hello all!

I spent Saturday in the UFaTM and it is fantastic!

As you walk to the entrance, which overlooks Belfast Lough, you come across a huge mounted propellor blade, which came from the Oceanic (1899. So you can imagine how happy I was before I even went in the door!

Inside there is a stunning Titanic exhibition, I didnt realise how good it was as it has been over ten years since my last visit.

If you want to see original blueprints with modifications signed by Thomas Andrews and complete original plans of how H&W framed and plated the ship (complex beyond belief!) then this is the place to go.

With contemporary publications, a superb photographic archive, original passenger letters posted at Queenstown and the original famous launch ticket, the whole experience was overwhelming.... even my long despairing girlfriend was amazed!

There were also superb photos of the outfitting and construction of the "Oceanic" and "Teutonic" and massive scaled models of the latter and the fabulous liner "Andes". I could go on and on.....!

Im not big on trains and buses but there is also what has to be the most amazing collection of transport memorobilia in the world in this place.

I recommend it to any of you who are planning a visit and I wonder what others who have seen it think.

Excited as a little boy-ishly!!

Sam
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Sam,

I loved your story of your trip to the Titanic exhibit. Thanks for writing it. I am very happy to see it. I almost felt like I was there myself. Could you tell me what UFaTM is.

How blessed you are to have seen this wonderful exhibit. My deep desire is to visit England some day so I can visit all of the lovely scenery and the docks that once held the magnificent ocean liner Titanic. I can think of so many things I'd love to see. That's why I requested photos to be posted, because some of us may not ever get the chance to fly over there!

Take Care.

Sincerely,

Teri
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Teri, UFaTM=Ulster Folf and Titanic Museum.

I wouldn't mind seeing this place myself, especially the blueprints and modifications signed by Thomas Andrews. I wouldn't mind having them either, but the material offered by Harland and Wolff to the public is anything but cheap!

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Michael,

Yes, I too, have noticed a few original Titanic collectibles are always a bloody fortune!! How I wish I had so much more money to buy the Titanic collectibles I set my eyes upon!

One book written by John B. Thayer was selling for $1,700!! (an original) Now that's a cryin shame!

Yours,

Teri
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Not much of a shame for the previous owner I'll bet. I think I'll look for survivors books in the odd reprints available at the bookstores.

You might want to consider buying the edition edited by Jack Winnocour. It has the accounts written by Beesley, Colonel Gracie, Charles Lightoller, and Harold Bride. It's well worth the money and the price tag won't kill your budget.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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I think you have to distinguish between collectables and useful source books. Many of highly priced originals are of little value for research, as they were written long after the event. Rostron's book is a typical example. By the time he wrote it, Californian had no radio! Also, he does not mention any of his officers and crew by name. As Mike says, go for modern reprints. I would add, get the rarer books from a library and copy the relevant bits.
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Dear Michael,

No, probably not a shame for the previous owner but I do think it a bit high considering you can buy a reprint of it. I'll see about getting Jack Winnocour's book.

Dear Dave,

Good point, some items are collectibles and some are useful sourceful books. I am interested in both. I don't understand why Rostron wouldn't mention his crew by name in his own book. I have been searching for Rostron's book and have not found it yet... Darn!

Teri
 

Sam Brannigan

Member
Feb 24, 2007
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I find it interesting that in the American Inquiry Rostron remembers the names of certain female survivors from the Titanic, yet he couldn't recall the name of the wireless operator on his ship at the time of the disaster.

I don't think it's sinister, perhaps just a curious quirk of working at sea in 1912.

Regards

Sam
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Quite right, Sam. Rostron mentions a few Carpathia passengers by name in his book but all the rest are referred to by their ranks. The whole book is like that. He names all the ships he served on and one or two Cunard officials. His wife gets a line or two.
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Dear Sam,

In reading the American Inquiries I too, thought it odd that Captain Rostron did not know the names of some of his officers. That REALLY struck me as odd. I mean people generally know the names of their co-workers, right? Why should Rostron be any different? Weird I tell ya, weird. If he doesn't concern himself with the names of his people, one is left to wonder what he DOES concern himself with...

Teri
 
Dec 2, 2000
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I would think operating his ship was his first priority. Unlike the worlds navies, merchent crews tend to change from one voyage to the next. Rostron might have been serving with officers he had never met befor or whom he hadn't seen in years.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Michael,

Okay Michael if that was the case for Rostron than why didn't he state so that he had never met them before or hadn't seen them in years?

He sure made himself look silly by not clarifying himself in front of the Enquiry.

Teri
 

Steve Arnold

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Dec 31, 2000
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Maybe it was just nerves. Under pressure you can forget just about anything. I had to testify once and pretty much forgot even my own name!
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Steve,

Okay good point about being nervous. Whatever happened at the Enquiry is what we have recorded, so I guess we either accept it or don't accept it.

Teri
 

Sam Brannigan

Member
Feb 24, 2007
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I deliberately said in my earlier post that Rostron didn't know the name of his wireless officer "at the time of the disaster".

Marconi operators were not bound to any particular ship, or even shipping line. They were assigned by their overall employers, the Marconi company.

It does seem strange, though, that Rostron should forget the name of such a hugely important member of his crew on the night and during the trip to New York.

Perhaps this could be explained by him having a quartermaster or junior officer delivering and receiving correspondance from the wireless shack.

This would mean that Cottam's only direct meeting with the captain was when he stormed into his room with the news of the Titanics plight. I am sure the last thing on Rostrons mind was "Blimey! We better rush to her assistance....but first, what's your name, Sparks?!"

Regards

Sam
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Sam,

Yes you covered yourself well with the statement of "I deliberately said in my earlier post that Rostron didn't know the name of his wireless officer "at the time of the disaster". I'll take that with a grain of salt since I have no other choice but to do that. Unless Captain Rostron was on this board himself we'll never know why he didn't remember his crew's names. But that's okay, it was the night of the sinking of the greatest liner in the world and that's okay if a few things slipped the Captain's mind!

Sincerely,

Teri
 

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