Uniforms of Deck and Victualling Crew

Seumas

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Mar 25, 2019
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I have quite few questions about the non-officer deck and victualling crews uniforms if I may.

Recently I read an excellent run down of what the deck officers uniforms were here - Uniforms worn by Titanic's officers | William Murdoch

Is there any surviving documentation as to what exactly what White Star's mandatory uniforms were for it's ....
  • AB's, lookouts, quartermasters & storekeepers (deck) ?
And would I be right in imagining that the bosun, bosun's mate, masters-at-arms, lamp trimmer, carpenter and joiner would all wear something similar to a petty officers uniform with a buttoned jacket and peaked cap ?

Do we know what the stewards uniforms were like ?
  • Bedroom stewards and saloon stewards would have worn different attire wouldn't they ?
Also, would the non-saloon and non-bedroom stewards have had different kind of uniforms depending on their role ?
  • I refer of course to the lounge, smoking room, library, boots, pantry, plates, "glory hole" stewards and storekeepers (victualling).
The same too for the galley crew.
  • Did the cooks, butchers, bakers & scullions have to wear any kind of company attire ?
And my final question is...
  • Is it true that the crew would have had to purchase their own uniforms and if so do we we know what the cost would have been to them c1912 ?
Many thanks for reading this, it really interests me.
 

Harland Duzen

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Jan 14, 2017
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In "Guide to the Crew of Titanic" by Günter Bäbler, there is an Appendix dedicated to covering what everyone had to wear, but to answer parts of your question: Seamen and Lookout wore the same attire of a "Guernsey, embroidered 'White Star Line' on Breast; man of war cap, with ribbon, having 'White Star Line' in gold thread; blue serge trousers. All uniform parts were sold by the boatswain." Lookout also got given free jackets.

Crew (both officers and seamen) did have to buy their uniforms and there were several companies in both Southampton and Liverpool that supplied them via a contract. I don't know what the cost was.

Hope this answers some of your questions.
 
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Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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There are also several earlier threads in this topic addressing various uniform questions.
 

Seumas

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Mar 25, 2019
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There are also several earlier threads in this topic addressing various uniform questions.
I am very sorry for posting what may seems duplicate topic but after searching previous years posting I decided to post this as I just felt that the topics from years gone by did not entirely answer the questions I had in mind and of course in the years since they were posted, some new information may have came to hand.

Apologies again and thank you for helping.

Also this article...:
Thank you very much for kindly providing that link

It is though the "lower ranks" and not the officers I'm interested in. The William Murdoch website mentioned above already answered any questions I had about the officers.

But thank you all the same. That was kind of you.
 

Seumas

Member
Mar 25, 2019
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In "Guide to the Crew of Titanic" by Günter Bäbler, there is an Appendix dedicated to covering what everyone had to wear, but to answer parts of your question: Seamen and Lookout wore the same attire of a "Guernsey, embroidered 'White Star Line' on Breast; man of war cap, with ribbon, having 'White Star Line' in gold thread; blue serge trousers. All uniform parts were sold by the boatswain." Lookout also got given free jackets.

Crew (both officers and seamen) did have to buy their uniforms and there were several companies in both Southampton and Liverpool that supplied them via a contract. I don't know what the cost was.

Hope this answers some of your questions.
Thanks :)

That the lookouts got free coats and that the boatswain was involved in equipping uniforms came as a surprise to me.

The crew having to buy their own company uniforms would also discourage them from moving frequently between different shipping lines I take it ?

It wouldn't be surprising if a "second hand" uniform trade existed between men who were perhaps quitting the sea and men needing a uniform.

That book on the crew (which I did not know about) has just went "on the list".

Many thanks again.
 
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Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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On page 47 of Titanic Voices there is a copy of the bill left by Sidney Sedunary, a steward, at his death. He was supplied with uniform by Miller
& Sons of High St and Canute St, Southampton, who evidently supplied a great deal of clothing to seamen.

It's a bit long to post here, but it includes boots for 7/11, a suit for £2-5-0 and even a tin of boot polish for 4d. With shirts and other things he was fairly well fitted out for £6-4-0. He paid some of this off over several months, but his estate was left owing £4-2-0.

He was paid £5 per month, so this was a pretty large expenditure. He would have hoped to add to his pay with tips, a practice that continues today.
 
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Seumas

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Mar 25, 2019
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On page 47 of Titanic Voices there is a copy of the bill left by Sidney Sedunary, a steward, at his death. He was supplied with uniform by Miller
& Sons of High St and Canute St, Southampton, who evidently supplied a great deal of clothing to seamen.

It's a bit long to post here, but it includes boots for 7/11, a suit for £2-5-0 and even a tin of boot polish for 4d. With shirts and other things he was fairly well fitted out for £6-4-0. He paid some of this off over several months, but his estate was left owing £4-2-0.

He was paid £5 per month, so this was a pretty large expenditure. He would have hoped to add to his pay with tips, a practice that continues today.
That was really enlightening Mr Gittins, thank you :)

I put Mr Sedunary's £6 4s bill into an historical inflation calculator and it came back as being worth £603.00 in today's money.