Unknown Child Positively Identified

M

monica e. hall

Member
Taking care of an unknown baby for 90 years is a very fine thing. I think the family have made a dignified and generous decision.
 
Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
I totally agree, they could very well have requested that the remains be returned to Finland to be with the deceased family members and that would have been their right. Instead, they chose to leave the remains where they are and for that I commend them.
 
H

Hildur Panula-Heinonen

Member
Eino was my g-g-g- grandfather, and we are keeping his remains where they are, i mean why move them now, after so long?My grandma, Magda, always swore it was Eino buried in that grave, and a few years ago we found it true. We have visited with him many times, and we love him.
 
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Hildur Panula-Heinonen

Member
Magda,is my grandmother, and we have visited Eino's grave for each of his missed bithday's, and the day he died.
 
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Heather McKee

Member
This is a very touching subject. I'm completely amazed!! After 90 years of not knowing who the baby was, it was discovered that it was Eino Panula. May his little soul rest in piece.
 
Kyrila Scully

Kyrila Scully

Member
Hey, what happened to Meredith's post? It was a legitimate question, and there was no malice in it.

Kyrila
 
Kyrila Scully

Kyrila Scully

Member
For the record, Eino Viljam Panula was 13 months old when he perished on Titanic. He had no descendants. His body was one of the first bodies recovered. His mother and brothers all perished. His father was back in the U.S. and did not travel with the family on Titanic.
Here is the link to Eino's biography.
https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/biography/1118/
 
Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
Hi Kyrila,

It appears that Meredith removed her post.
 
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Hildur Panula-Heinonen

Member
kyrila, my grandma's grandma is Eino's mother's sister.
 
Kyrila Scully

Kyrila Scully

Member
Ah, so he was your great-great-grandmother's nephew, then. I think your statement "Eino was my g-g-g- grandfather" confused people because that would indicate Eino having sired children and grandchildren and great-grandchildren, etc., which of course would have been impossible. Trying to figure out relations of ancestors can be confusing to most people unless they are amateur genealogists. Eino would be your 6th cousin. Thank you for clarifying this for everyone. I'm sure we all support your family's decision regarding Eino's remains. I trust you have all found peace with his identification.

Kind regards,
Kyrila
 
R

Richard Coplen

Guest
Please note that since these postings it has been confirmed that the "Unknown Child" is NOT Eino Panula! Advanced DNA testing and an analysis of the shoes found on the baby's body have proved beyond a doubt that the body was that of SIDNEY GOODWIN. This was reported in last week's Daily Mail newspaper. The "Unknown child" is now known to be SIDNEY GOODWIN.
 
Kyrila Scully

Kyrila Scully

Member
Richard, could you post a link to that article so that everyone can read it in its entirety? Thanks!

Kyrila
 
Kyrila Scully

Kyrila Scully

Member
Thanks, Richard. I was pleased to see that Alan Hustak was identified as the author of the article. He is well-known in the Titanic historic community. Wikipedia also provided our site here as the source of additional information.

In reading the article, I began reading the comments by one of the bloggers. I found it interesting and wished to share it here.

"Clarence Northover, a Halifax Police Department Sergeant in 1912, helped guard the bodies and belongings of the Titanic victims.
'Clothing was burned to stop souvenir hunters but he was too emotional when he saw the little pair of brown, leather shoes about fourteen centimeters long, and didn’t have the heart to burn them. When no relatives came to claim the shoes, he placed them in his desk drawer at the police station and there they remained for the next six years, until he retired in 1918.'
Excerpt from July 26, 2002 letter by Earle Northover, grandson of Clarence Northover."

The article calls Sgt. Northover a "souvenir hunter." I think he was just a sensitive man, a father with children of his own, who couldn't bear the weight of the tragedy of this child's death to add to it by destroying his shoes. I don't think his actions were selfish in the least.

Kyrila

[Moderator's Note: Two threads addressing the same subject have been merged to become this one. MAB]
 
T

Timothy Trower

Guest
Here is a link to the original Alan Hustak article in The Gazette, July 30, 2007.
 
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