Updated Mauretania Article


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Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Hello, all. Check out Eric Longo's updated, beautifully illustrated Maurentania article

http://northatlanticrun.com/735/Tyne_Departure.html

now up and running.

I enjoyed, very much, being able to read this piece while it was in draft condition, and can give a sincere "Beautifully done- nice work" now that it is complete. Take the time to read through it, and enjoy the almost exclusively unpublished illustrations.....I get very frustrated by "new" works that turn out to be cut and paste jobs of the same old stories with the same old pictures, and can say with no fear of contradiction that this article is NOT such a creature.

But now, Eric...the Second Act is....?
happy.gif


Congrats!
 

Eric Longo

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Hi Jim, Jason:

Thanks very much!
I am very pleased you guys enjoyed it. Second act...hmmm.. ;)

Best wishes,
Eric
 

Eric Longo

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Hi All,

well, another year - 102 have passed now since the launch of this great liner. The article linked above (and below) still works - it covers events of September 17, 1907 and much more.
And Jim, the "second act" turned out to be non-liner related! As you know, I am now doing restorations for one of our National Museums
happy.gif

More information to follow...
In the meantime, I look forward to seeing how the color slide restorations I did for Mark Chirnside's new Aquitania book came out.

Farewell to the Tyne: Photographs and Memories of the Mauretania Leaving South Shields

Best wishes,
Eric
 

Lucy Burkhill

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Mar 31, 2006
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Hi Eric,

Some wonderful images there in your article! Many thanks for sharing it with us. A perfect tribute to Mauretania on the 102nd anniversary of her birth!

Lucy
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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I will add my accolade to those of other Mauretania buffs; you have done our Lady proud, so good to see new material about her, although we have a long way to go before we beat all the Titanic stuff. Excellent, and many thanks once again.
 

Eric Longo

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Hi Ellen,

It is quite gratifying to hear you enjoyed it! You asked in another thread about other Mauretania fans here at ET - Lucy B. in the thread above has a very strong love for the Mauretania. There are several others; as I said the boards are often quiet but post something of interest and they show up like clockwork.

Best,
Eric
 

Lucy Burkhill

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Hi Ellen,

So pleased to hear from another Mauretania fan out there!

I was interested to hear that you have a collection of Maury items, including one of those little medallions claiming to be made from metal from her. I too have one of these, and have wondered just how much metal is actually from her, still, it's a nice little item. Do you have anything made out of her deck wood, or any other souvenir items? Do you also have any books about her? As a fellow Mauretania fan I would be interested to hear what you have about her.
I particularly enjoyed reading your posting in the other thread about "A prayer for Mauretania"
happy.gif


Best wishes,

Lucy
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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Dear Lucy. A quick post (from work). I have a small dish and a matchbarrel made from her wood. Also several books, including "Home from the Sea" by Capt Sir A H Rostron and the reprints of Shipbuilder. I am glad to hear from any Maury fans, will write more later. Best wishes, Ellen
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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Dear Lucy. Some more books:
Mauretania, Humphry Jordon, 1936 issue (not reprint) RMS Mauretania, Gerald Aylmer. 7cs reprint (Titanic Historical Soc) The Liners of Liverpool, pt 1 Dereck M Whale.Long chapter about M and L. Distinguished Liners The Shipbuilder Vol 1 Mark D Warren (reprints from Shipbuilder magazine, large chapter on M and L cont
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

Guest
The Mauretania, 1907 edition of Engineering, edited by M.D. Warren. pub 1987. Ocean Liners of the Past _ L and M. Vol 2 of reprints from Shipbuilder, pub 1970 Patrick Stephens. Both books well worth getting if you are a technophile, there's heaps of interior and exterior photos, diagrams, photos of equipment and fittings - all her secrets are revealed!
Commodore by Sir James Bisset, 2 chapters of her WWl trroping and hospital voyages to Gallipoli. 1 short chapter on the 1921 fire. Metal Industries by Ian Buxton (demolition photos) Fine Art Views of Liverpool, Birkenhead and New Brighton, no pub date, but amongst the buildings etc are five photos of M and L, one of them snuggling up together in Sandon dock, one of Maury squeezing herself through the entrance, when I picked this up in a antiquarian book shop I nearly swooned.
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

Guest
Dear Eric, May I print off your article to send to a penfriend in South Africa. In the 1930s, her father got a job in Maury's orchestra and went on one or two cruises. My friend remembers her father crying as he read the news account of her sale to the breakers.
 

Lucy Burkhill

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Hi Ellen,

You certainly have a good collection of books there! Yes, the H Jordan book is an excellent "biography" of the liner, unfortunately my copy is not a 1936 edition. I also have the Mark Warren reprint of Engineering, the G Aylmer book, and one entitled "Liverpool and the Mersey Vol 1: Gladstone Dock and the Great Liners", which was being sold off as old stock from the local library, and which has some great photos of Maury. Another excellent little book I have is "Mauretania - Pride of the Tyne", which was published by Newcastle Libraries and Information Services, and sponsored by Swan Hunter, it is full of great images, and has a wonderful description of her launch.

Love the bit about your friend's father having a job in her orchestra. The fact that he cried as she was sold to the breakers reveals just how much she was regarded with affection.

Lucy
 

Eric Longo

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Hi All,

Today, October 22, marks 101 years since the Mauretania left the builders yards at Swan and headed up and over for Liverpool, arriving on the morning of October 24, to be made ready for her official trials in November. Some data was collected on the way as well - the performance of her boilers, turbines, and several other measurements were informally recorded. On October 23, it was entered into the log that she had reached a maximum of 21.9 knots. For those who have not read it, unpublished photographs, recollections and period accounts can be found in the article linked in the posts above.

Best,
Eric
 

Eric Longo

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Hi All,

I have been working on another update to this article. Lots of new information about her trials and so on has been added along with a chronology. I will post a link when it is complete. This is the third update I have made. I am pleased to add information and corrections - as I get mail from readers some have included suggestions - and this means people are reading!
happy.gif


Best wishes and thank you,
Eric
 

Eric Longo

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Thanks Mike,

I hope you will not be disappointed. I have managed to get some good detailed information regarding her trials from the original logs. The data recorded September 17-20, the exact course and informal data recorded October 22-24 and the data from her November 3-7 formal trials as well as other information I hope you will find interesting such as the chronology. It is among the most accurate to date I daresay with regard to her war service at least.

Best wishes,
Eric
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I hope you will not be disappointed.<<

With primary source data such as what you described, I doubt I'd be disapponted. You really ought to consider writing a book about this ship. With all the attention the Lusitania has recieved, the Mauritania seems to be getting short shrift.
 
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