Use of electricity for heating


Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,043
107
333
UK
The Shipbuilder special issue on the Olympic and Titanic, first published in 1911, has been reprinted at various times in book form. Not in print right now, but second-hand copies can generally be found from online dealers - try the Amazon marketplace. If it's the electric heaters you're interested in, more or less the same information can be found in this 1911 article from The Electrician (see bottom of page):

 
Aug 10, 2014
17
0
31
44
Portsmouth, VA USA
Titanic's heating system

Not sure if this has been answered or discussed already, but I'm curious:

Was Titanic's heating system a hot-water or steam system. I know that steam was used to power the engines, but wasn't sure if hot water was used for heating (as well as potable hot water service).

Thanks!
 

Doug Criner

Member
Dec 2, 2009
447
68
133
USA
First class cabins had electric heat. Most other spaces had more than enough heat due to heat transmitted from machinery spaces through bulkheads, by electric lighting, etc. Mechanical ventilation was provided. A reference is Titanic, The Ship Magnificent, Vol. 1, by Bruce Bevridge.
 

Keith H

Member
Oct 13, 2017
120
72
73
I thought the electric heaters were provided as supplementary heating to boost the temp on exceptionally cold days in the north Atlantic.
Two other reasons to provide electric heaters would be
{1} to save installation cost of additional pipe work of of steam or water heating that would not be in use a great deal,
{2} if part of the normal heating circuit was out of action you had the electric heaters to move around to the affected part of the ship.
 

Similar threads

Similar threads