USS Monitor


Dec 12, 1999
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Does anyone know about the status of the recovery of the U.S.S. Monitor's gun turret? Last year, the engine was recovered. This ship is being brought up in pieces. I expect it will eventually be re-assembled in a museum.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
As far as I know, the gun turret is still down there. The problem is that the beast is pinned under the wreck itself which makes things a bit tricky regarding recovery.

Of course, for all I know, they might have hauled it up by now.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Dec 12, 1999
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Michael,
I saw on one website that the Navy planned to bring up the turret this year. Last year, they raised the engine -- and before that, the propellor. It's a very dangerous dive, because of the bottom currents. Why don't you check with one of your Navy friends and see if any of them know what's afoot?

Take care.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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I might do a Google.com search when I have the chance. I'm not what you would call a "hooked up guy" in Navy circles. I know that Navy divers have been working there for several years.

I had a chance to tour the Nauticus Museum in Norfolk back in '98 to'99 when I was stationed on the USS George Washington, and one of the exhibits they had were the fragments of armour salvaged from the CSS Virginia. Sure would be nice to see that added to.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Aug 29, 2000
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The Providence Journal ran a short article this morning that attempts to raise the Monitor's turret were postponed today due to high winds and exceptional currents.
 
Jan 7, 2002
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Do you suppose they intend to recover all of the hull? Though crumbled, im sure with some conservation and some bubblegum, it could be pieced togeter again.

What exciting times for Civil War buffs- First the Hunley was raised- Now the Monitor..

Any other Civil War wrecks that should be recovered? How about the General Slocum?

Tarn Stephanos
 
Jan 7, 2002
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Michael,
here is somthing that puzzles me- I dont think the Navy has any marine archaeology specialty- so where do the divers come from? The Navy webpage lists divers as just being SEALS, but that doesnt seem right..

Also, is NOAA affiliated with the Navy? They seem to have a Navy like officer hierarchy. Or are they more of a merchant marine outfit, or purely civilian? Mabey a branch of the Coast Guard?

regards

Tarn Stephanos
 

Erik Wood

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Aug 24, 2000
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NOAA is more affiliated with the U.S. Coast Guard then the navy. Although NOAA maintains the same rank structure for officers it's deck hands and such are just average Joes.
 

Adam Leet

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May 18, 2001
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"Do you suppose they intend to recover all of the hull? Though crumbled, im sure with some conservation and some bubblegum, it could be pieced togeter again."

I highly doubt they'll attempt to raise the hull, and I believe they mentioned their decision not to salvage it. It's in lousy shape, even worse than Titanic's stern section. All a diver has to do is put his/her hand on a frame, and it crumbles.


Adam
 
May 8, 2001
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Michael. THANK YOU FOR THE LINKS. Robert has been panic striken because they have not had any updates lately on the NOAA Site. It has become such news that it has been heard on radio stations and news print all over California. I will pass it on so he can watch the progress closer.
 

Erik Wood

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Aug 24, 2000
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Leave it to Mike to know where all the good links are.

That NOAA site is hard to navigate I think. I wish they would come up with something more people friendly.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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An interesting project there. Looks to me like they're using some modern day construction techniques including the use of modular sections and welding.

The funny thing is that I've seen the place where the Monitor slugged it out with the Virginia. You can see it from the carrier piers at the Norfolk Naval Base. In military terms, the engagement was tactically a draw and rates as a minor skirmish in a very long war. However, it was a cusp event as it was in this engagement that the days of the wooden man 'o war came to an end when it was shown that even the least of the ironclads could trash the mightiest of the wooden battleships with a few shots.
 

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