Vegetarian meals


Lee Gilliland

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Feb 14, 2003
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I know that WSL accommodated Jewish people with Kosher meals, but does anyone know if they also accommodated vegetarians? I imagine there would be some aboard the ships.
 
May 8, 2001
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Hi Lee. (IMO...) Kosher is religious and strict preparation and food guidelines would be followed, whereas vegetarian is a personal choice. If a person was vegetarian, wouldn't they just order what they wanted to eat from the menu, and/or tell them to hold what they did not wish to have on their plate? As would a person with an allergy to a certain food, or spice request that the item not be added. Interrested in hearing from others who would know the menu items, and on board life better.
 

Lee Gilliland

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Feb 14, 2003
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OK, that makes sense - in those days it was an individual choice which was their responsibility rather than a acceptable lifestyle.
 

Kyrila Scully

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Apr 15, 2001
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I've been a vegetarian since 1975, and I can tell you that vegetarianism was not as common as it is today. In 1912, one would most likely find vegetarians among those of Eastern religions or Seventh-Day Adventists. This is not to say there were no other people who were vegetarians, but there was not a strong movement for it until later years, perhaps during the late 20's and 30's when a health reform movement was able to capture the attention of the media.

Kyrila
 
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Nichole Tamayo

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Have any of you read "Last Dinner on the Titanic"? It is a great reference book if you have not.
It gives all the recipies for the dinners and desserts aboard the ship that final night from first class to third. It also gives reference to how the tables looked, the flowers, and what might have been available on the other nights aboard.

Nickey
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Dec 2, 2000
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I bought this book a couple of years ago. Quite a useful resource. It may not tell one an awful lot about the Titanic, but it does a nice job of showcasing what the cuisine and customs of the era were like.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Sahand,

I did actually, pg.76, Chicken Lyonnaise is extremely nice. I used to stuff it up, but the more I do it, the better I get. AND pg.88, che chocolate painted Eclairs. That used to take me 3 hours, but I'm getting better at them as well, these too are extremely nice, I guess because everything is home made, rather than being packet custard.

Daniel.
 

Kyrila Scully

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Apr 15, 2001
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There was a woman who used to post here who made the entire first class meal for a party a couple of years ago. Apparently it was a great success.

Kyrila
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Hallo Sahand -

I have a mate and former flatmate who has a doctorate in medieval history and is a stickler for historical accuracy. She's also a great cook and delights in period recipes. She had a dinner party a few years ago where she made as much of a first class menu as was practicable (sent me in search of the right cheeses, but not all were available!)
 

Arun Vajpey

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Apr 21, 2009
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>>>>> Does anyone know if they also accommodated vegetarians? I imagine there would be some aboard the ships.<<<<<<

Getting back to the original question, how did vegetarians cope in the Titanic era? I know that they were not accommodated as they are nowadays, but as Lee says there must have been a few. As a vegetarian myself, I would be interested to know.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>how did vegetarians cope in the Titanic era?<<

I suppose they could have made some sort of request through the staff in the dining room. Short of that, they would just have to be choosy. It wasn't as if one was required to eat everything on the menu. For those in First Class, it wouldn't have been all that incredibly difficult to use the extra tariff restaurant and simply confine your order to whatever was acceptable to you.
 

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