Victor Giglio

Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
Giglio was valet (probably more of a secretary or personal assistant than a servant) to Mr Benjamin Guggenheim
IMO, this could some it up. Victor Giglio was very likely a sort of "personal assistant" to Benjamin Guggenheim and his duties depended upon where they were and what they were doing at the time. In a working environment, Giglio would have performed duties of a personal secretary while in a situation like on-board the Titanic, he would become more of a valet. Overall, Giglio's position must have been a notch above that of a 'servant'; I have read that they were seen sitting next to each other on deck chairs, something a simple valet would never have done in those days.

No offence intended but on a lighter note, I sometimes refer to the pair as "Gig and Gug" for short while indulging in my habit of scribbling notes about Titanic related events.
 
Matthew Chapman

Matthew Chapman

Member
Perhaps Giglio was to Guggenheim as Laura Francatelli was to Lady Duff-Gordon. In service, but also a friend and confidant.

This is a speculation, but with Giglio and Mme. Aubart, do you think Guggenheim swung both ways?
 
Thomas Krom

Thomas Krom

Member
Perhaps Giglio was to Guggenheim as Laura Francatelli was to Lady Duff-Gordon. In service, but also a friend and confidant.
That could be possible, Miss Francatelli even ate with her employers in the á la carte restaurant on the 14th of April.
This is a speculation, but with Giglio and Mme. Aubart, do you think Guggenheim swung both ways?
From what I have heard there is no evidence to suggest that he was bisexual or anything close to that, nearly the opposite I would even state. Benjamin Guggenheim was a noted womanizer and playboy, preferring younger women such as Madame Aubart. I believe there is no evidence to suggest he swung both ways.
 
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
Perhaps Giglio was to Guggenheim as Laura Francatelli was to Lady Duff-Gordon. In service, but also a friend and confidant.
IMO, that is quite likely. In those days, businessmen who travelled a lot often had a 'sidekick' who performed several duties including providing friendly companionship. Like a General Manager of the CEO.
This is a speculation, but with Giglio and Mme. Aubart, do you think Guggenheim swung both ways?
I did not mean those king of 'duties'. Seriously, I think it was unlikely in those days for someone who was "B" to take the risk of travelling with paramours from both sides. Not impossible, but unlikely.
 
Yuki.y

Yuki.y

Member
Good evening.:)
Thank you so much for answering my question! I've only been looking at this site and forum for a long time, so I'm very happy to get replies from members whose names I've often seen and admired.

I'm sure that Mr. Giglio was both a valet and a secretary. I have no objection to that.
I just checked and found that he was also described as a valet in the text of "a night to remember". I don't know why Mr. Walter Lord described him as a valet, but I'm sure that's how he was portrayed in the movie with the same title, and when it was more difficult to find primary sources than it is now, the impression given by the images may have contributed to the widespread perception of Mr. Giglio as a valet.
(The subtitled DVD of this film seems to be out of print in Japan, and unfortunately I have not been able to see it yet. ......)

Luckily Mr. Guggenheim and Mr. Giglio have their exact adres listed on this very list and give their adres as Avenue Montaigne in Paris, France. Sadly I cannot confirm the exact adres as either number 57, 59 or 67 due to the handwriting. However, I believe number 57 is the most likely choice.

On Google maps it shows a large, luxurious terraced house if you type number 57 down. Since Mr. Giglio joined Mr. Guggenheim to France so I believe it is possible that he stayed at this very same adres.

Thank you so much. I was referring to the record with this very address on it. I also read this number as 57. I don't know if this was their home at the time, but it's fun to think that they may have eaten and slept together frequently outside of Titanic.
No offence intended but on a lighter note, I sometimes refer to the pair as "Gig and Gug" for short while indulging in my habit of scribbling notes about Titanic related events.
What a cute abbreviation! I refer to them simply as G&G. When two of their names are in a row, there are a lot of "g "s, which makes them easy to spot when reading the material.

This is a speculation, but with Giglio and Mme. Aubart, do you think Guggenheim swung both ways?
I have thought about whether or not they were romantically linked. Mr. Giglio was the same age as Mme. Aubart and had the same talent for music as she did. Also, Mr. Giglio was, in the words of Mis Peggy Guggenheim, a "lovely young egyptian" and a "beautiful boy. I'm sure he was a truly beautiful young man. However, as Mr. Thomas Krom and Mr. Arun Vajpey said, there is a lot of information about Mr.Guggenheim's love for many women, but I have yet to read any rumors or descriptions that he was bisexual. I can't say for sure what their sexuality was with the little information I have, so I'll just say that I haven't found any evidence that they were a couple.:)
 
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