Violet Jessop

Michele

Member
Dec 31, 2009
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Does anyone know the cabin number and the location of Violet Jessop's room, the Glory Hole location and what deck was Violet a stewardess on?
Thank you!!
Michele
 
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Daniel Rosenshine

Guest
Hi!

No one really knows which room Violet Jessop was in. She never revealed it in her interviews. Stewardesses did not occupy numbered cabins. On the various decks there were special rooms for stewardesses. They were marked "stewardess" on the deck plans.

Although no one knows for sure, Violet Jessop was probably on E deck, in the stewardess room next to the elevator hall, oposite cabin E20.

Hope this helps.

Daniel.
 

michelle

Member
Sep 30, 2009
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Thank you Daniel!!!
One more question.......Do you happen to know which first class passengers she was serving, was she working on C deck?
michele:)
 
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Daniel Rosenshine

Guest
Hi!

As I said "although no one knows for sure, Violet Jessop was probably on E deck"

Miss Jessop does not mention names at all in her account, well when she does they are only names she made up for the people she was talking about. Her account is rather confusing, but it is still interesting.

She frequently mentions the staircase. She mentions "youngsters" in a cabin accross to hers, and she mentions putting a lifebelt on a child, who might be Douglas Spedden, but this of corse is not for sure.

She sais she went up on deck, so I presume she was definitely not on A deck. E deck is a likely possibility for her cabin.

Daniel.
 

belle

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Aug 1, 2011
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Hello, I had a question regarding Violet Jessop, who is she? was she a passenger on the Titanic? Can someone tell me? thanks. Belle
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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There is a book called Titanic Survivor, which consists of her memoirs, plus a commentary. I suggest you read it for interest but I wouldn't spend cash on it. For some reason she uses false names for nearly everybody involved and the book adds little to what we know.
 
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Lisa Watson

Guest
I agree with what Dave said and I just wanted to say that I bought a copy at Barnes and Noble for $6 whereas other places I have seen it have been $16 and up.
 
Aug 17, 2006
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I first heard about Violet Jessop one evening on a program on the Discovery Channel. When I learned that she published memoirs of her survival on the Titanic and her sister ships, Brittanic and Olympic, I rushed to buy it. Although, as Dave says, it uses fake names and is a very limited account, the book is quite interesting.

Violet Jessop survived the well-known Titanic disaster. Then she served aboard the Brittanic, which became a hospital ship in WWI. Brittanic suffered the same fate as her sister ship when she struck a mine. I can't recall what exactly happened with the Olympic, but I believe she also sank. Violet Jessop served as a stewardess until she was about 60 or 70. Then she finished her years in her home of England.

Hope I answered some questions for you.

ADRIANNE
 
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Dean Manning

Guest
Actually, Adrianne, with all due respect, the Olympic did not sink. She went on to serve in WWI as a troop transport, and then made the trans-Atlantic run untill 1935, when she was scrapped.

-Dean
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Adrianne, as Dean pointed out, the RMS Olympic didn't sink. in fact during World War One, she earned a destinction in being the only merchent vessel to sink an enemy warship when a lookout spotted a german U boat on the surface on the morning of 18 May 1918. They were too close to train down the auxilary six inch guns fitted for self defence so the Olympic turned in on the sub and rammed it.

During that war, she was one of four ships being used as troopships. After the war, the Olympic was overhauled and refitted for passanger service in which she served until being retired in 1935 and sold for scrap. Far from being an unlucky ship, she was much loved by passangers and was nicknamed Old Reliable

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Aug 17, 2006
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Thank you, Dean and Michael. You're right. I wasn't quite sure about the Olympic.

Violet Jessop did serve aboard the Olympic, though, didn't she?

Best Regards,
ADRIANNE
 
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Dean Manning

Guest
Adrianne, Michael,

Violet Jessop did indeed serve aboard the Olympic. I'm not sure of the exact dates, but I can tell you she was on Olympic when she was rammed by the HMS Hawke just off the Isle of Wight; which implies that she served on Olympic first.

-Dean
 
Aug 17, 2006
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I found this on the Internet:

"The Olympic and Brittanic both served as hospital ships in World War I, but only the Olympic survived the conflict--the Britannic exploded on just her fifth voyage. And in 1934, the Olympic struck the Nantucket Lightship, killing seven. The damage to the massive ship was so extensive that she was sold for scrap the following year."

-HistoryChannel.com


BEST REGARDS,
ADRIANNE
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Hi Adrianne, and now you know why some don't take the History Channel too seriously as a source. The Olympic was used as a troopship during the war. As to the Nantucket Lightship, the damage to the Olympic wasn't that severe. Inch thick steel plate vs. the much thinner plating of a lightship isn't much of a contest. ;-) She was used for eleven more months befor being retired in April of 1935. (The collision with the lightship happened on 15 May 1934).

In the end, it was economics which led to the Olympic's retirement. She had been losing trade for some time and the Depression didn't help. Were it not for the Depression, she might have lasted a few more years.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Dean Manning

Guest
Hi Adrianne.

It seems Michael has beaten me to the punch here. After the Nantucket lightship incident, the Olympic was repaired and continued to make crossings untill march of 1935, after which time her interiors were acuctioned off and the hull was towed to Inverkeithing, Scotland, were it was demolished.

As far as the Olympic being a hospital ship, I really, really doubt it. Hospital ships, which were painted in white with big green stripes and red crosses(like the Britannic), were protected under the Geneva(sp?) convention, which prohibited them from being attacked by German U-boats. If the Olympic did in fact serve as a hospital ship, wouldn't they have given her a hospital ship paint scheme to protect her(Olympic was painted in bright colors to confuse U-boats)?

Dean
 
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Florian B. Millare

Guest
i have just found out on a book that Miss Violet Jessop is also in the adriatic. it reads "Violet Jessop, a stewardess, had once nearly capsized on the Adriatic..." Is this true?

thanx
 
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Ashley Jean King

Guest
Hi am am only 11 yrs old and I am already Fasanicted on the Sinking of Titanic.

Information needed on Violet Jessop who was a strewadress on the Unsinkable R.M.S Titanic

PLEASE HELP ME