Voyages That Didnt Happen


Seumas

Member
According to Greatships.net, the ageing Majestic become a reserve ship after the Olympic entered service in 1911. After the Titanic disaster, the Majestic was brought back into service to fill the Titanic's planned 1912 schedule.

Considering how some of the Titanic's passengers had been transferred from laid up ships of the American Line which was also part of IMM, presumably it could work the other way too ? If for whatever reason White Star couldn't find them berths then the overspill are accommodated by other IMM concerns such as American Line, Atlantic Transport Line, Dominion Line, Red Star Line etc
 
Keep in mind that the number of lifeboats on British vessels were only up to the same antiquated standard that Titanic and Olympic were when many passenger arrangements had to be rebooked. Anyone willing to fly on the Boeing 737 max 8 right now?
 

Scott Mills

Member
Keep in mind that the number of lifeboats on British vessels were only up to the same antiquated standard that Titanic and Olympic were when many passenger arrangements had to be rebooked. Anyone willing to fly on the Boeing 737 max 8 right now?

Having to replace Titanic with Majestic must have been a tough blow for White Star, particularly if they were trying to cement brand loyalty. There was a far cry between the type of passage one could expect from an Olympic class liner, and Majestic--the Majestic having been built in 1889.

Furthermore, White Star would suffer more with the loss of Britannic in the First World War. Basically, they had to go an entire decade with only one large modern liner, but I suppose this was partially true of Cunard as well. Cunard lost Lusitania during the war, but Aquitania, which was finishing her fitting out (much like Britannic) in August of 1914 survived. Meaning pretty quickly after the war Cunard was able to restart at least her two ship express service.

Cunard did have to wait to start her three ship express service though with the loss of Lusitania. Having purchased Imperator from the British government and re-christening her Berengaria, it turned out she needed an extensive rebuild before she was ready to actually enter service for Cunard.

Incidentally, I forgot about the IMM angle. White Star *could* easily re-book people on other IMM ships, but in addition to what you pointed out, Sam, regarding the reluctance to board ships with inadequate lifeboat capacity immediately after Titanic sank, I assume many people booking passage on a large modern liner--and paying a premium--were doing so on purpose.

Given this, had I purchased passage on Titanic's return voyage, I would be pretty irritated to now how to take one of these smaller IMM vessels, which had far fewer amenities, was far slower, and much more prone to roll around in the ocean and make passengers sick for half the voyage.
 
Were there any records of whether or not any of those persons mentioned in those news articles continued on their voyages on other ships since it was obviously impossible to book passage on the Titanic and they would have been only able to book on lesser ships with lesser amenities ?
 
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Having to replace Titanic with Majestic must have been a tough blow for White Star, particularly if they were trying to cement brand loyalty. There was a far cry between the type of passage one could expect from an Olympic class liner, and Majestic--the Majestic having been built in 1889.

Furthermore, White Star would suffer more with the loss of Britannic in the First World War. Basically, they had to go an entire decade with only one large modern liner, but I suppose this was partially true of Cunard as well. Cunard lost Lusitania during the war, but Aquitania, which was finishing her fitting out (much like Britannic) in August of 1914 survived. Meaning pretty quickly after the war Cunard was able to restart at least her two ship express service.

Cunard did have to wait to start her three ship express service though with the loss of Lusitania. Having purchased Imperator from the British government and re-christening her Berengaria, it turned out she needed an extensive rebuild before she was ready to actually enter service for Cunard.

Incidentally, I forgot about the IMM angle. White Star *could* easily re-book people on other IMM ships, but in addition to what you pointed out, Sam, regarding the reluctance to board ships with inadequate lifeboat capacity immediately after Titanic sank, I assume many people booking passage on a large modern liner--and paying a premium--were doing so on purpose.

Given this, had I purchased passage on Titanic's return voyage, I would be pretty irritated to now how to take one of these smaller IMM vessels, which had far fewer amenities, was far slower, and much more prone to roll around in the ocean and make passengers sick for half the voyage.
Considering you would have had " to take one of these smaller IMM vessels" do you think you would have gone ahead on your voyage anyway ?
 

Seumas

Member
Many immigrants would just want to get to the USA or to Canada and start their new life. Not everyone would care about whether vessel X was more luxurious, fast and up-to-date than vessel Y.
 

Seumas

Member
I daresay some of them of them might care but then as now there are still those only interested in getting from one country to another. A first class couple who take their meals in their cabin and only go for a walk on deck at night won't care about the lounge, the library, deck games or the smoking room.

Someone who in 1912 booked a first or second class passage on the packed Allan Line or Anchor Line steamers departing from the Clyde wasn't bothered about luxury or speed or the prestige of the vessels, they just wanted a simple, safe passage to North America.
 
Majestic maiden voyage 1890 may have an older ship for WSL. But how about there other newer big four ships built for WSL.
Celtic, Cedric, Baltic and Adriatic! They may of been bit slower than the Olympic and Titanic, but certainly had a high standard of luxury not to be laugh at!
 

Scott Mills

Member
Considering you would have had " to take one of these smaller IMM vessels" do you think you would have gone ahead on your voyage anyway ?

Well, that all depends on why you were traveling, and any other arrangements you had made. I am sure some would simply cancel the voyage; however, if you had made it all the way to New York from Kansas by rail, or were traveling for business. then probably.
 
>Were there any records of whether or not any of those persons mentioned in those news articles continued on their voyages

Yes. The Ancestry database allows one to determine which ships they eventually crossed on. Many crossed IMM. Some, business travellers, crossed on the Mauretania,

>Does anyone know how long it took White Star to refund tickets sold for Titanic's return voyage, or whether or not White Star merely transferred passengers to another White Star liner?

The Indianapolis newlyweds were told, after the disaster but before they were married, that White Star had taken care if their rebooking. So they departed on schedule. It was handled quickly,
 
Many immigrants would just want to get to the USA or to Canada and start their new life. Not everyone would care about whether vessel X was more luxurious, fast and up-to-date than vessel Y.
I think the difference would be in whether you consider whether the persons were concerned about the reason for their journey.
The west bound immigrants would not care what type ship they would take.
Their aim was just to be to get to the United States or Canada.
Besides most of them probably had no idea of what ships and ocean voyages were like.
So it would make no difference to them as to what kind of ship on which they sailed.

Eastbound passengers , I think , would be mostly those of at least the upper class or rich who were traveling for pleasure and would be more discerning .

I would have to review the 1997 "Titanic" but I think there might have been somewhere in the movie why or how "Jack Dawson" got to France in the first place ?
 
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Have you ever heard of anyone who had ever planned a trip by ship, examined what was available and got so turned off by what they saw and abandoned any and all plans for them ?
 
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