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Nov 9, 2002
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Hello all,
I know you must be getting sick of me on the message board with all the questions I post up! Sorry
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but getting to the point. How would passengers wake in the morning. Would they tell a steward to wake them up? The steward would have an alarm clock? Well sorry for posting once again another question and I hope you all have a very nice evening!

THANKS.
Sahand
 
Jan 31, 2001
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I always figured they would tell their steward or stewardess about what time they wanted to be woke up.

I'm sure no one is sick of you, Sahand. This message board was made for questions. That's how one learns.
 

Matt Smith

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Feb 24, 1998
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Sahand, I love your questions. They are good and well thought. Please keep them coming.

Anyway, did they even have alarm clocks then and maybe most passengers just slept until they woke up.
 
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Camron Miller

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I think they did have alarm clocks, but they were only used by servants and the lower classes. Those with servants were woken by a knock at the door, then a servant would come in, draw the curtains, and serve tea/coffee. Passsengers would probably have asked to be woken by stewards or stewardesses at a pre-arranged time.
 
Nov 9, 2002
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Hey Guys,
Cool! Nice info! I wish someone would do that for me in the morning instead of the annoying alarm clock. School hours are no fair. Well I dont know about anyone on the Titanic but I would be sleeping till 12:00 at latest!

Sahand
 
Jan 31, 2001
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School hours are no fair.

You've got that right! My dad has a ritual where he turns on the bathroom light, then gives me a good shaking every morning...at 6:30 a.m.! Twelve sounds good to me!

Only six months until summer vacation...
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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Morning tea would be served to staterooms by the bedroom stewards/stewardesses at standard times depending on the time of breadfast service in the dining saloons. Calls for first or second sittings, if applicable, would therefore be at different times.

Any departure from standard call times would be by special arrangement with the BR.

This is of course for first or second class cabin passengers. Steerage would probably be awoken by the duty night steward heaving a bucket down the alleyway. Well, something like that!

Noel
 
May 8, 2001
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Waking up..... hmmmmmm.
You know, Matt, Those very same words in the last post were used by the honorable PA Gowan not too long ago. Must have telepathic powers.
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Leona Nolan

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Dec 17, 2002
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I can't believe you don't get up until 12.00 Matt!!! Your so lucky, I'm usually in work by 8.00
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Wish I had a steward to gently rouse me from sleep and serve me breakfast in bed each morning!! Anyone looking for a job????
 

Matt Smith

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Feb 24, 1998
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Well I guess great minds think and act alike Lee, ha ha. For the rest of you guys you should try it sometime it a whole new experience.

Later
Matt
 
May 20, 2002
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I wondered if the "Master Clock" had a bell ringing function, that was connected to some sort of bell or alarm. Most of the clocks in passenger areas were "slaved" and controlled by the Master.

It seems like this type of system would have been efficent in waking the crew at least.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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The system had no alarm that I'm aware of and in any case, there was no need. With crewmembers constantly up and about 24/7, it was a simple enough matter to send people to their berths to wake them up.

Even if the Titanic had a general alarm system, I strongly doubt it would have been used as it would have been all too easy to panic the passengers that way...which was the last thing they ever wanted to have happen.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Regarding emergency alarms, this extract from the evidence given by steward Andrew Cunningham at the US Inquiry might be of interest:

Senator SMITH. I wish you would tell the committee the signal that calls you to your station in case of an emergency.
Mr. CUNNINGHAM. We have not any regular signal, sir. You mean to the heat station?*
Senator SMITH. Yes.
Mr. CUNNINGHAM. Oh, that is a blast of the whistle from the bridge; one long blast of the whistle.
Senator SMITH. Did you hear a blast of the whistle giving the signal that night?
Mr. CUNNINGHAM. No, sir. It is very hard to hear, you know when you are between decks.

* Cunningham had earlier mentioned a fire drill.
 
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Marykate Viola

Guest
I don't think that they would ring a bell because not everyone wants to wake up at the same time, so I think that they just woke up when they wanted to.
 
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Jake Angus

Guest
I think the 'toffs' would wake up at home to the sound of their servants drawing the drapes. If not that, a wee shake, then the tray w/the bkfst tea or coffee and biscuits sliding onto their laps.
I imagine the same would hold true at sea.
 
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