Wall Coverings


S

sashka pozzetti

Guest
I couldn't find anywhere better to ask this, so here goes. I am interested in the wallpaper used on the ship. What I am wondering is , is it definitely wallpaper, not fabric stretched.If it is wallpaper, (I have no idea one way or the other) how did they glue it down, so that wouldn't peel off, with all the exposure to damp air? I have recently stripped some Edwardian paper, and it had been waterproofed with what seemed like varnish. Was this done in other parts of the ship? I then started wondering what the walls were made of on the ship, under the wallpaper. Does anyone know, or can tell me of a thread where this is discussed? Thanks!!!

[Moderator's Note: This message, originally posted to a thread in the "Cabin Number" topic, has been moved here and set up as a separate thread. MAB]
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Sashka,

There was very little "wallpaper" on Titanic. Unless my sources are incorrect, there were six cabins that had silk damask 'wallpaper' and six cabins that had lincrusta 'wallpaper' - which essentially was like vinyl or linoleum, but on the wall. They would have had a wooden backing, as most of the paneling and partitioning was wooden. As far as I know, there were no other areas (other than the 12 staterooms) that utilized wallpaper.

Daniel.
 
Jan 7, 2002
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One detail I notiiced on 'The Big Piece' was there was quite a bit of horsehair and plaster material still affixed to the D deck partition, and D deck porthole rims- all that material was apparently water blasted off during conservation- I suspect that the horsehair material was between the metal of hull and any wooden panels....
 
S

sashka pozzetti

Guest
Ah, I know about Lincrusta, as I used to have it in my own house. It is thick lino putty that is put through patterned rollers to make 3D patterns. It is held together on a paper backing, which you have to stick onto a paper lining which is hung across the wall in the opposite direction.. I think the wallpaper guy had to use a special adhesive because the paper was very heavy, but when it had dried it was very hardwearing, and could be painted any colour. It was originally used a lot in low areas, below the chair rail, which were subject to being knocked and hit. I suppose there may have been plaster on the ceilings, where photographs show ornate patterns, unless this was tin. I don't see why there might not be a bit of plaster in the best rooms, unless the rooms 'moved' and it would have cracked too much. I don't know about movement in a ship. Could the silk damask have been a wall covering (actual stretched fabric) and not a paper? or is it definitely paper?
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Sashka

I don't think it was paper - it would have been silk.

As for the D Deck part of the "Big Piece", wasn't that part of the plate room - or from some section of the D Deck gally/pantry areas (I'm not home to check my plans). In which case, there would have been nothing ornate about the room it originally belonged to.

Daniel.
 
S

sashka pozzetti

Guest
I was not thinking about the big piece, though it sounds like it was plaster attached, I was just looking at photos of some of the ceilings. If it was just silk damask, not actual wallpaper, it would have been stretched on batons.
 

Helena Brazil

Member
Jul 22, 2016
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Hi all

I found this thread online and I know its a little out of date but was wondering if anyone out there has any further information on the use of Lincrusta on Titanic?

I am a masters student and looking to write a research report on Lincrusta and am very interested in your conversation. David Klistorner, you mentioned records for 6 cabins that had lincrusta? Where would I find more information regarding this? Most notably the design and location within the boat?

Also does anyone know of any surviving or salvaged examples? Actually any information on Lincrusta would be fantastic.

Many Thanks to you all in anticipation
 

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