Was Californian Caught in an Eddy?

A

AlexP

Member
It was atmospheric light he was referring to...not the ship's light itself. Incidentally, perhaps someday you will see "the light".?

“When I came off the bridge, at half-past 10, I pointed out to the officer that I thought I saw a light coming along, and it was a most peculiar light, and we had been making mistakes all along with the stars, thinking they were signals.”
 
Jim Currie

Jim Currie

Senior Member
It was a most peculiar night,
When the captain saw that light
He wasn't wrong but surely right, for soon her ports were seen.
There was nothing wrong with that that man's sight,
'Cause he also saw her green.

(Apologies to McGonigle)
 
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Samuel Halpern

Samuel Halpern

Member
Another transcription error that occurred at the American hearings. Here's the formal correction:

7340. (The Attorney-General.) I would rather see the original. (The log was handed to the Attorney-General.) My friend, Mr. Edwards, put some questions about what happened at the Court of Inquiry in America. I have the Report from America, and I think it is right to put this to the witness. (To the Witness.) I see you said this in answer to Senator Smith, in America: “When I came off the bridge at half-past ten I pointed out to the officer that I thought I saw a light coming along, and it was a most peculiar light. We had been making mistakes all along with the stars, thinking they were signals”? - [Lord] “Most peculiar night,” I think that should be.
 
Samuel Halpern

Samuel Halpern

Member
Maybe it was Vega?
You must be joking, no? Vega, which is a magnitude 0 star in the constellation Lyra, was about 18° above the horizon in the NE at that time. Even Titanic's masthead light would not be that bright unless she came to within about 6 miles of an observer. If you're looking for a rising star, look toward the SE.
 
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Jim Currie

Jim Currie

Senior Member
You must be joking, no? Vega, which is a magnitude 0 star in the constellation Lyra, was about 18° above the horizon in the NE at that time. Even Titanic's masthead light would not be that bright unless she came to within about 6 miles of an observer. If you're looking for a rising star, look toward the SE.
How do you think the lights of Titanic would have looked at 6 miles, Sam? here's a photograph of a ship in Belfast Lough. She is about 3 to 4 miles away as the crow flies.
1564606073144
 
Julian Atkins

Julian Atkins

Member
I have posted a bit about Groves in January 1916 on another thread...


It seems to me that Groves was a bit of a fantasist in old age!

Cheers,

Julian
 
Samuel Halpern

Samuel Halpern

Member
How do you think the lights of Titanic would have looked at 6 miles, Sam?
The Titanic was never within 6 miles of Californian. But, if there was a moon that night, something like one of her sisters.
1564675245777
 
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A

AlexP

Member
The Titanic was never within 6 miles of Californian. But, if there was a moon that night, something like one of her sisters.
View attachment 44919
So they would not have seen any lights at all? Cause this image of yours shows no lights.
Cruise ship


This cruise ship is more than 20 miles from the camera, maybe even more than 25.
 
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A

AlexP

Member
You must be joking, no? Vega, which is a magnitude 0 star in the constellation Lyra, was about 18° above the horizon in the NE at that time. Even Titanic's masthead light would not be that bright unless she came to within about 6 miles of an observer. If you're looking for a rising star, look toward the SE.
It is complicated to convert time, but there were plenty of stars at the time the Captain saw a star that he took for a light, or you now too believe that the Captain saw a mystery ship?
 
Jim Currie

Jim Currie

Senior Member
The Titanic was never within 6 miles of Californian. But, if there was a moon that night, something like one of her sisters.
View attachment 44919
Imagine that without the moonlight and showing her accommodation lights. How could anyone mistake such a sight for a tramp steamer or something like the Californian?
 
Samuel Halpern

Samuel Halpern

Member
If I recall correctly Seumas its from a photo of Olympic from the 1920s.
That picture was taken from almost six nautical miles away. You can easily get the distance knowing the overall length of the vessel and the width of the moonstreak on the water.
 
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Samuel Halpern

Samuel Halpern

Member
How could anyone mistake such a sight for a tramp steamer or something like the Californian?
As I said, Titanic was never within 6 miles of Californian, and when she did stop, she presented an acute angle on the bow to Californian, hull down beyond the visible horizon, not a broadside view within the horizon like the picture of Olympic that I posted.
 
Samuel Halpern

Samuel Halpern

Member
If you're looking for a rising star Alex, look toward the SE. For GMT, add 3h 10m.
 
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