Was Smith in Baltimore in July 1912?


laura

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How do you do?, A Captain Peter Pyral claims he saw Captain Smith in Maryland, Do you thinks that they're is any chance that Captain Smith survived this terrible disaster? what are you're thoughts on this. Sincerely Laura
 

chloe

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I also read, that Captain Smith was seen in Baltimore Maryland, some time after the disaster this man say's he was quite certain that it was him he said he would recognize Captain S. anywhere.This may have been a case of mistaken identity. Chloe
 
J

Jimi Humpalot

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Because of Titanic's notoriety, there have been many, many far-fetched stories over the years. I believe that this is just as fanciful as the rest!

Is it possible that he could of simply remembered seeing Smith at a different time or maybe he genuinely mistook someone else as E.J.Smith? Perhaps he just lied to get his face in the paper?

Believe me, there are always people who are prepared to exploit a famous incident to further their own ends...
 
Mar 20, 2000
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The press of 1912 was not immune to publishing ridiculous stories. Just as today the National Inquirer & other such rotten tabs claim gorillas can & do give birth to space aliens, the papers of those days put out their share of trash. That Capt. Smith survived the Titanic is only one of many absurd tales connected w/ the disaster - but one I must confess I had not heard til now!
 
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Heres a quote from the new york times of 1912 any ideas on this. Was mentioned to me a few days ago.

ok are we sure captain smith went down with titanic someone just informed me of a guy claiming to have seen captain smith on July 21,1912 The same guy worked with him on the majestic. It was reported by the New York Times


From the New York Times (July 21st 1912)

Captain Peter Pryal, one of the oldest mariners in Baltimore and well known in shipping circles and who had sailed with Captain Smith when he was commander of the Majestic, made a startling statement today.

Captain Pryal said he saw and talked to Captain Smith yesterday (July 20th) at Baltimore in Saint Paul's Streets. He declares he walked up to Captain Smith and said; "Captain Smith how are you?" The man answered; "Very well Pryal, but please don't detain me, I am on business". Pryal said he followed the man and watched him buy a ticket to Washington, and as he passed through the gate of the railroad station, Captain Smith turned, recognized Pryal again and said; "Be good shipmate, until we meet again."

"There is no possibility of my being mistaken" said Captain Pryal today. "I have known Captain Smith too long. I would know him even without his beard. I firmly believe that he was saved and in some mysterious manner was brought to this country. I am willing to swear to my statement. Many persons may think I am insane by saying this, but I have told Dr. Warfield of the occurance and he will vouch for my sanity."

Dr. Warfield said tonight that Captain Pryal was perfectly sane. The Captain is of well-to-do means and is a consistent church member.
 

Martin Cooper

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Dec 13, 2007
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Hi all.

I don't know if this has been asked before, however, let me explain.

I have a habit of going through the threads, both old and new, and reading various comments etc.

Whilst going through these the other day, I read a comment about the Carpathia picking up the survivors.
It was mentioned that a survivor had been picked up and rushed away quickly from prying eyes. It occurred to me at the time that this person could well have been Bruce Ismay. However, later I got to thinking about something that I had read in George Behe's book titled, 'Titanic, Phycic forewarnings of a tragedy'.

In the book, George takes us through all sorts of curious coincidences, mistaken accounts, hoaxes, and all sorts of psychic phenomena.

I read a very strange account that occured on the 19 July 1912, three months after the sinking, A Captain Peter Pryall was in Baltimore, Maryland. He was one of the oldest and best known seamen in shipping circles, and had know Capt Smith for many years. Pryall was therefor startled when, at the corner of Baltimore and St Paul street, he saw a man whom he was certain was Capt Smith. He walked up to the man and said, 'Captain Smith, how are you'? The man replied, 'Very well Pryall, but please don't detain me, I am on business'. Pryall followed him to the railway station and saw him buy a ticket to Washington, then as he walked through the barrier gate, he turned to Captain Pryall and said, be good shipmate, until we meet again'.

Pryall reported this incident and stated that, 'there was no possibility of my being mistaken, I have known Captain Smith for too long, I would have known him even without his beard, I firmly believe he was saved, and in some mysterious manner, brought to this country, I am willing to swear to my statement'.

George Behe comments that Pryall was well to do, a consistant church member, and that he had no conceivable motive for fabricating a story like this, and his reasons for doing so remain a puzzle.

So, I wonder who the person rescued by Carpathia and whisked away quickly from sight was? Could it possibly have been Captain Smith?

Very strange to say the least.

Does anyone on the forum have any thoughts or other information regarding this very strange story?
 

Arun Vajpey

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That story has already appeared on ET before. It was dismissed less than a month after Pryal's claim in 1912.

DOUBT STORY OF CAPTAIN PRYAL

It has also been discussed in several newspaper archive sites....and usually dismissed either as a hoax or one of mistaken identity.

One possibility is that the man who Captain Pryal met was a dead ringer for Captain Smith. As has been shown in some "Is this Captain Smith?" type photos, stocky middle aged men with white hair and beards can sometimes be mistaken for one another from a distance or when seen from certain angles. The real Captain Smith would have been very much in the news in July 1912 and this other man had probably been told by his friends and acquaintances how much he resembled the late Captain. The then elderly Captain Pryal probably made the same mistake and the other man, now used to it, must have decided to play along. Not very nice of him of course.


Pryall was therefor startled when, at the corner of Baltimore and St Paul street, he saw a man whom he was certain was Capt Smith. He walked up to the man and said, 'Captain Smith, how are you'? The man replied, 'Very well Pryall, but please don't detain me, I am on business'. Pryall followed him to the railway station and saw him buy a ticket to Washington, then as he walked through the barrier gate, he turned to Captain Pryall and said, be good shipmate, until we meet again'.

That above information is probably from a newspaper clip of Pryal's statement and cleverly edited to make it sound more mysterious. In all probability, Captain Pryal would have introduced himself before asking the other man how he was but the reporter likely omitted that part to make it appear as though "Captain Smith" had recognized Pryal and thereby add a touch of "authenticity" to the story. The fact that the other man did not want to be detained shows that he did not want to let the cat out of the bag.
 
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Cam Houseman

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That story has already appeared on ET before. It was dismissed less than a month after Pryal's claim in 1912.

DOUBT STORY OF CAPTAIN PRYAL

It has also been discussed in several newspaper archive sites....and usually dismissed either as a hoax or one of mistaken identity.

One possibility is that the man who Captain Pryal met was a dead ringer for Captain Smith. As has been shown in some "Is this Captain Smith?" type photos, stocky middle aged men with white hair and beards can sometimes be mistaken for one another from a distance or when seen from certain angles. The real Captain Smith would have been very much in the news in July 1912 and this other man had probably been told by his friends and acquaintances how much he resembled the diseased Captain. The then elderly Captain Pryal probably made the same mistake and the other man, now used to it, must have decided to play along. Not very nice of him of course.



That above information is probably from a newspaper clip of Pryal's statement and cleverly edited to make it sound more mysterious. In all probability, Captain Pryal would have introduced himself before asking the other man how he was but the reporter likely omitted that part to make it appear as though "Captain Smith" had recognized Pryal and thereby add a touch of "authenticity" to the story. The fact that the other man did not want to be detained shows that he did not want to let the cat out of the bag.
I think another factor to think about is, Olympic was making big cash for White Star, how would they feel if Capt. Smith abandoned her to take a trip here randomly
 

Martin Cooper

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Sorry, my bad but at 65 one does get the occasional "Senior Moment" ;). I meant 'deceased' of course.
LOL, occasional senior moment at 65, just wait until you get in your 70's, they seem to get more occasional as time goes on.
Then of course there are times when you start to forget where you have put things, you search high and low but to no avail, then it will turn up in a place that you hadn't thought of looking, and you ask yourself, 'I wonder what made me put it there'. LOL.

Don't worry Arun, it happens to us all at sometime, and as the saying goes 'time and tide wait for no man'.

Anyway, thanks for the information, now it is making me wonder just who was the mystery man that was picked up and rushed quickly away from prying eyes by the Carpathia?
 
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Arun Vajpey

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Anyway, thanks for the information, now it is making me wonder just who was the mystery man that was picked up and rushed quickly away from prying eyes by the Carpathia?
Could it have been Bruce Ismay? I recall reading somewhere that he was given a cabin for his sole occupancy on board the Carpathia and others were not allowed in or something like that.
 
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Cam Houseman

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Could it have been Bruce Ismay? I recall reading somewhere that he was given a cabin for his sole occupancy on board the Carpathia and others were not allowed in or something like that.
Plausible, the poor guy was through a disaster and was already being hated on the Carpathia IIRC. I can only imagine the press before Hearst slaughtered his career
 

Arun Vajpey

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Bruce Ismay became unfairly infamous only after the Titanic disaster. Before then, I doubt if people other than Officers, a few senior crew and select First Class passengers could have recognized him face to face. He would not have been familiar to most Second and Third Class passengers, not 'ordinary' crew working below decks. If one or more of that group saw Ismay being whisked away on board the Carpathia, they would not have known who it was. When they reported it, some journalists probably guessed it was Ismay but a "Mystery Man" would be more saleworthy, at least for a day or two.
 
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Martin Cooper

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Bruce Ismay became unfairly infamous only after the Titanic disaster. Before then, I doubt if people other than Officers, a few senior crew and select First Class passengers could have recognized him face to face. He would not have been familiar to most Second and Third Class passengers, not 'ordinary' crew working below decks. If one or more of that group saw Ismay being whisked away on board the Carpathia, they would not have known who it was. When they reported it, some journalists probably guessed it was Ismay but a "Mystery Man" would be more saleworthy, at least for a day or two.
Well, poor old Ismay was my first thought when I read the comment, (I wish now that I had made a note of the thread I read it on).

However, the comment said that this mystery man had been picked up alone from the sea and quickly hidden away from prying eyes. So if that is correct, then it couldn't have been Mr Ismay, because he was picked up along with other folk in a lifeboat, so it's a bit of a puzzler.

I will have to try and find the comment again, and see which thread it was in and also the commenter, (that is if he/her is still on the message board).

I do know that I was reading about the lifeboats being picked up by the Carpathia, but cannot remember the thread title (must be one of those senior moments again), lol.

If I find it, I will let you know.
 

Arun Vajpey

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However, the comment said that this mystery man had been picked up alone from the sea and quickly hidden away from prying eyes. So if that is correct, then it couldn't have been Mr Ismay, because he was picked up along with other folk in a lifeboat, so it's a bit of a puzzler.
Again, could this business about "picked alone from the sea" have been a bit of journalistic embellishment? AFAIK, the Carpathia picked up only lifeboat occupants.
 
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Could it have been Bruce Ismay? I recall reading somewhere that he was given a cabin for his sole occupancy on board the Carpathia and others were not allowed in or something like that.
Yes he was shuttered away and I have read he was given sedatives. I wonder what that was in 1912. Laudanum?
edited by me: Went and looked up drugs in 1912. Forgot about morphine which was a problem in those days. The civil war produced a lot of morphine addicts. And after a lot of others. 1912 was the year they started regulating it.
 
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