Was there a passenger liner besides the Leinster torpedoed on October 101918


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Jun 1, 2005
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I read a book on World War I and October 10,1918
a passenger liner was torpedeoed and 300 people
died and the same day the Leinster was torpedoed.

Was there another passenger liner torpedoed
the same day as the Leinster.

True of False?
 

Mark Baber

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Not according to the Admiralty's post-war report on shipping losses. Leinster is the only merchant ship listed as having been lost on 10 October 1918.
 

Senan Molony

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The Admiralty say only 176 died, which is an error continuously parrotted.

Over 500 died on the Leinster. They had a policy of not including certain fatalities, particularly those of soldiers aboard.

There is a new book by Philip Lecane called Torpedoed! about the Leinster, if you are interested, William.

It is fact-packed, but the detail is fascinating. A military policeman shooting dead a sergeant who refused to get out of a lifeboat, four or five crewmen seizing a lifeboat for themselves, that sort of thing.

This book is an "unexpurgated" sinking, because detailed accounts have been uncovered which owe nothing to the sanitisation that generally took place once officialdom held inquiries.

Recommended.
 

Senan Molony

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>>Was there another passenger liner torpedoed
the same day as the Leinster?<<

There was a small vessel sunk three and a half hours before the Leinster, and in a position about 60 miles to the north. No lives were lost.

It is not clear whether this attack was perpetrated by the same sub, UB-123, as it seems on the outer periphery of her range, backtracked from the Leinster location.

On the same day as the Leinster sinking however, the Admiralty disclosed the *previous* sinking of the Tokyo-registered passenger vessel Hiramo Maru. Is this the one you were thinking of?

She was of 7,936 tons and was sunk off some distance off the Irish coast on October 4, 1918. Some 300 died, with 37 survivors. The dead included South African troops.
 
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