Weather Maps on the fateful night


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Nov 2, 2000
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Being a meteorologist, I am interested in knowing if anyone has come across a site that provides the weather map for the fateful night. I searched and can't seem to find anything but microfiche or links to order such maps. I am especially curious to see how moist the lower atmosphere could have been in the vicinity of the ice field. From everything I have heard and read it was very dry as they was no haze seen except near the ice field. This likely would have occurred due to the sharp moisture gradient near the ice field and also possibly due to sublimation of the ice. Also interesting to see would be the strength of the low level temperature inversion which could have caused subrefraction which would have allowed objects to be distorted and also may have caused some anomalies in the way sound traveled.

Thanks for your help in advance!

Michael.
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Dear Michael Koch,
I think that you have asked a most interesting set of questions and ones that I have considered as well. Are the Microfiche simply not local for you to access them and of the links, what are the costs of such maps, do you know?

The closest that I have gotten is a Moon Phase, but I didn;t have time to check out the whole thing. Let me check it again and I will get back to you.

Would you mind very much emailing me, I have some other Meteorology type questions for you. My email address is [email protected]

thanks so much.
maureen.
 
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Kathy Savadel

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Hello, Michael,

I told my husband, who also is a meteorologist, about your question, and he recommended checking with the National Climatic Data Center at http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov.

He said you'd probably checked that out already, but on the off chance that you had not I thought I'd pass it along.

Best regards,

Kathy
 
Sep 20, 2000
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Michael:

Do you have any recommendations for solid reference materials on these atmospheric (and oceanic) refractive phenomena? I know of one particularly excellent *sounding* book intended for laymen, Seeing the Light : Optics in Nature, Photography, Color Vision and Holography. Unfortunately, it's an $80 college text and just a bit steep for me (Amazon has it.) There's also a very affordable Dover publication -- The Nature of Light and Color in the Open Air, by M. Minnaert -- that I do have, but it's a bit strained in the translation, and the illustrations are a little hard to make out. (The Dover reprint is copyright 1954 -- when the original was written is anybody's guess!)

Ever since I first encountered super-refraction et al. as topics, I've been interested in pursuing this whole series of anomalies -- mirage, looming, etc. -- but can't find the ideal source. Any tips for "best" references (in print or online)?

Much obliged!
John Feeney
 
Nov 2, 2000
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Thanks so much for all your help in this matter, I really apprciate it!

Kathy, I tried the NCDC site as well and it doesn't seem very user friendly to me! I imagine I'd probably have to pay for the data but not sure as it's hard to navigate that site! BTW, where does your hubby work? Thanks!

John, I don't really know any great sources as far as atmospheric optics goes. It sounds like your source would be as good as any. Thanks a lot for the link, I'll check it out!

Maureen, I'm not sure about the microfiche and don't know about the costs either. Helpful aren't I? LOL I guess I was just hoping to find a simple link with a search for weather maps of any time period, but realistically that database would probably be too large to post. Not sure.

David, if I find an easy way to access the data for 1913, I'll let you know. Now that I think of it, it's possible we have old weather maps somewhere here in storage. I'll check and see! Thanks!

Thanks again all!

Michael.
 
Nov 2, 2000
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I just checked with our climatologist and we have every freakin river gauge reading since the 1800's but no dern surface weather maps! I guess if I really want it, it will cost me then! grrrr

Michael.
 
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Kathy Savadel

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Hi, Michael!

Yeah, Jeff said it might be a difficult site and that one might have to pay for data. :-(

He's a journeyman forecaster at WFO Marquette (MI) right now but just -- yahoo! -- got a job at the NWS HQ in Silver Spring, MD, so we are headed back to our beloved Fredericksburg, VA.

Ahem! Sorry to get off topic. Actually, his new job is in marine forecasting, so if you have not been successful by the time he gets settled in, perhaps he could help in tracking down a pertinent weather map for you.

Cheers,

Kathy
 
Nov 2, 2000
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Kathy,

Tell Jeff congrats! Glad to see you get to go home
happy.gif
I'm a journeyman forecaster as well here at Indianapolis. I bet you guys had more than enough of your share of snow up there and are very glad to be going to a warmer climate! Marine forecaster seems interesting, but I myself have had no experience with it. It's another world. BTW, I went to school with one of the forecasters that was at Marquette for awhile but forget his name. I'll have to try and remember and let you know. Anyway, thanks and good luck
happy.gif


Michael.
 
Nov 2, 2000
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Kathy,

I just went to the Marquette home page and now know who it was I know. It's Donald Rolfson. BTW, I really like their Edmund Fitzgerald presentation!

Michael.
 
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