Were the Titanic stewardesses assigned to a class onboard the ship?

Charles

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I have been researching 9/11 stuff during my Titanic years, and into the process, I found that onboard the flights (I found on Flight 93 first) the flight attendants had been assigned to a certain class cabin (such as one flight attendant assigned to first class, another into coach, etc.)

I know this is true about STEWARDS but what about STEWARDESSES? If so, which class was Violet Jessop assigned to?
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Same goes for the Stewardesses. Jessop was in 1st class. (The crew list is not correct, Wallis is listed as 2nd class but was responsible for 3rd class).
 

Charles

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Wallis is listed as 2nd class but was responsible for 3rd class
One more thing: Speaking of this, wasn't Stewardess Catherine Wallis a matron. If so, does that mean that she worked in both Steerage and the Hospital?

Also, the list may have mixed up her with Stewardess Lucy Snape, a second class stewardess who also died that night.

Postscript- The picture of Mrs. Wallis kind of reminds me of Rose's maid Trudy in the 1997 film.

catherinewallis.jpg
 

Bob Godfrey

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The designation 'matron' was not restricted to somebody with medical duties - it could be used to describe any woman whose work involved attending to the needs of other women and/or children, in a school for instance or even a prison. Mrs Wallis certainly had no medical qualifications.
 
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Wallis was the matron for 3rd class (on the list she is in the 2nd class but that is not right) and looked for the needs of the women and children there (as Bob described it above).
 

Charles

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it could be used to describe any woman whose work involved attending to the needs of other women and/or children
So does that mean that Catherine Wallis was a stewardess as well? The job of a matron and a steward/stewardess seems to fit in the same category.
 

Bob Godfrey

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She was there to help the passengers but also had the function to some extent of a warden. She was required, for instance, to keep a lookout for obvious signs of contagious illness and to report any sightings to the ship's doctors.
 
A

Andrew Williams

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>>>Mrs. Wallis certainly had no medical qualifications.

Hang on a minute, I did learn that she may well have attended a Hospital in London - possibly the Middlesex Hospital to become a nurse. As usual and as the Middlesex closed some twelve years or so, I cannot trace or even put my finger on the so-called "historical archives" as they may well be under lock and key under a special clause not to be open in such and such year. I am not disbuting Bob's suggestion but one needs to take the necessary care in case there's some true in the claim I inherited some years back.