Wet and Dry on Cameron's Set


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Nigel Bryant

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Jan 14, 2001
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Hi,

In the Cameron Movie when they lowered the interior sets like the Reception Room and Dining Saloon into the tank, how did they dry the props before shooting other scenes? It would take hours for the props to dry especially the carpet. Did all the movie helpers get countless heaters and drying fans to dry all the props etc?

Regards,

Nigel
 
Jul 9, 2000
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I may be way wrong, but I doubt they dried them at all. I suspect they made sure they got everything right with the scenes requiring the sets to be dry. That way, when they moved on, it wouldn't matter.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Sam Brannigan

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Dec 20, 2000
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Hi Michael and Nigel,

I believe that the scene when the glass dome caved in was a one off, with thousands of gallons of water flooding the set.

The preparation for the scene must have been extremely precise and the actors must have been really tense - when it actually happens I find that the guy who plays JJ Astor seems to be strangely wooden when the fireworks start,as if just gripping a pillar and looking for directions. Apart from that, IMHO, the general effect from that one off scene is terribly realistic and very powerful.

Regards

Sam
 

Ben Holme

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Feb 11, 2001
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Hi all,

Accoording to the book "James Cameron's Titanic" the sets were all pretty much destroyed when they were flooded. Certainly the grand staircase and dome were beyond salvage after the first take. Such was the force of the water, blown in from above, that the staricase was ripped from its steel foundations and broken to smaller pieces which floated through the gaping hole in the top. It has been suggested that this is what happend to the real Titanic, as there was a great deal of staircase floating on the surface after the sinking (see on-line exhibit).

Sam - I too, noticed Astor's reaction! He seemed to regard the imploding dome as a mere inconveneince! (It probably had something to do with "superimposing" problems)

Powerful scene, nonetheless!

Ben
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Nigel, the water they used was quite real. In fact, I remember seeing a documentary detailing how the flick was made, including the dumping of tons of water through the glass dome over the Grand Staircase. One remark in particular I remember was where Kate Winslet commented on how cold the water was. (CG anything has no temperature at all.) Not surprising as while the locale for the sets and the shooting was in Mexico, the ocean has a cold water current flowing just off the coast.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Nigel Bryant

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That's really quite amazing how they managed to get the water and destroying all the sets. There must of been massive safety issues.

When they made "Titanic Explorer" and they did the tour shots of the set, they must of done them before they sank the sets into the water.

Didn't they built the bridge and the wheelhouse in the actual ship set at Baja Mexico?

You know the scene when Capt Smith is in the wheelhouse and the windows implode inwards. Was that water real or fake. They must of had a stunt man in there or something if the water was real.

Emma, I heard that report as well.

Regards,

NB
 
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Jan Kite

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Hi Sam. The dome was a one off take and if you look carefully, you can see the strobe lights behind the dome. regards Jan BTS
 

Charmaine Sia

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Nov 25, 2001
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That happens to be one of the questions that puzzled me about the filming. I would be curious to know how they did their safety precautions over electricity.
 
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