What An Empty Ship


A

Alicia Coors

Guest
I got 100% on the written the first time I took it, and passed my flight test on the first try. I also got 88% on the instrument written the first time out.

Geez.

If you don't understand the point I was making, here it is spelled out: you are legal to fly an airplane and still lack 30% of the body of knowledge.
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,631
446
453
Easley South Carolina
>>I got 100% on the written the first time I took it, and passed my flight test on the first try. I also got 88% on the instrument written the first time out.<<

Congratulations. The time I had available and the money I had to fund it ran out befor I could ever finish what I started. Still an educational experience and one I wouldn't trade for anything. I still keep my manuals handy and try to keep up to date information handy. If nothing else, it's a great way of keeping myself news media proof.

>>f you don't understand the point I was making, here it is spelled out: you are legal to fly an airplane and still lack 30% of the body of knowledge.<<

But that's not the point you made. You made a very simplistic statement without mentioning the whole of the picture. And simply scoring 70% on the written doesn't mean they lack the knowledge. It could mean that, and it could also mean they just don't do very well on written tests.
 
A

Alicia Coors

Guest
Sam said
general aviation would be similar to automobile travel stats on a per mile basis.
...and would be biased by the number of drunks and incompetents behind the stick. MY odds of surviving a flight are MUCH greater than those of the statistical "average" pilot, because I don't fly impaired, I don't stretch my fuel, and I don't challenge the weather. If conditions look marginal, I play the Stanley Lord. I'd much rather be stopped and surrounded by ice than up against it.

Addendum to the above discussion of aeronautical knowledge: every summer there is a rash of accidents in the mountain states caused by a lack of understanding of density altitude. People come out here from flatland (having answered the DA question on their private written incorrectly but passed anyway), and wind up in a heap at the end of the runway because they ran out of lift, thrust, and power just at the moment when all three were critical to the outcome. The comparison to the amalgam of ignorance and raw hubris of Smith & Co. assuming they would be able to spot danger in time to avoid it is inescapable.
 

Matthew Lips

Member
Mar 8, 2001
304
1
171
If you honestly think that driving is safer than flying, you sure as heck don't live in South Africa! We even had a case of a taxi (no less) which was found to have brake pads made of .... cardboard. And I have to share the road with deathtraps like that!

Thanks, but no thanks. Given the choice, give me a good old fashioned economy class (can't afford the alternative) airplane seat any day.

Now, where is the Titanic in all of this...?
 

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