What Became of the White Star Line?


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Sarah

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Jan 22, 1998
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I was wondering if the White Star Line still existing? Because if it was it wouldn't be doing to good right? Any info is helpful. Thanks!
 

lucy

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White Star Line was eventually bought by Cunard, which as you know is still in existance today.
 

John Clifford

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Interesting follow-up: Cunard is now part of the Carnival Cruise Line.

Carnival's plan is to keep Cunard as a unique entity, so that Cunard will be "the Cadillac of the Carnival Line".
 

lucy

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Not actually. I am a travel agent, and Cunard is not OWNED by Carnival, or 'Part of' the Carnival line. They are in partnership with carnival. Most cruise lines are folowing the airline leads in partnerships (like Northwest/KLM, United/British Airways, etc.)...

They have informed us that they are still Cunard, and are not 'Part Of' only a 'Parnter of' Carnval Crusie Lines.
 
Dec 13, 1999
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Jennifer: I think the White Star was bought by the Cunard in the thirties, not long after the 1929 crash. Hope I helped.

Charles
 
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Roger Earle

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Imagine how Ismay must have felt at this,only 3 years before his death.
 
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K.C. Vendetta

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After reading a wonderful book, THE MAIDEN VOYAGE, by Geoffrey Marcus, New York/The Viking Press, it was apparent Ismay knew the outcome of the White Star Line as the Chairman of the Board was ousted from his position shortly after the Titanic sinking due to the embarrassment of his actions.
 

Nigel Hampson

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Jun 17, 2000
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Re Cunard White Star line Merger.
Can I just correct in a small way the information supplied above?
Cunard did not actually buy out the White Star Line. During the depression of the early thirties, both companies were really struggling to survive and both had been left high and dry with new ships sitting uncompleted on the stocks,and unable to afford to complete them.(Cunards was the uncompleted Queen Mary, white stars was an unamed project but believed to have been named Britannic - a smaller version of which was eventually completed.))They went cap in hand (and each unknown to the other) to the British Government for monetary aide.
The Government, struggling as were all countries at that time, would help only on the condition that the two companies merged, thereby requiring only one financial aide package. This they did in 1934, creating the "Cunard-White Star Line".
This lead to a virtual extinction of the existing white star fleet, as most of their ships were immediately sold off for breaking up. Incidentally, the company which bought Olympic, Homeric, Majestic and cunards Berengaria for scrapping were/are based in the town where I live - Sheffield England. They were called Thomas W Wards, and are still in business today, but not in shipbreaking. I have the 1938 book/catalogue from the company and it shows the Olympic being broken up.
Scans are available should anyone require them.
Hope no one minds me pointing this out !
Nige
 
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Nige

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The White Star Line - as a shipping line - is not living, No.

But I like to think that as long as people like all of us remember it, and keep it's memory going, thats a kind of life. As long as we dont let this story disappear into the depths of the history books, the legend of Titanic and the White Star Line will live forever.

Nige
 
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Shane Rembe

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Hi, folks! I'm a newbie here! I've been reading for a while with interest.

I've often wondered what happened to White Star Line. I've done a few searches online to find any info, but came up empty handed.
 
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Shane Rembe

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Thanks! The reason I ask, is just that I'm curious if White Star Line or an outgrowth of it still exists today.

thanks again!
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Hello Shane, the White Star line was sold back to British owners by the IMM back in 1927 and remained in competition with Cunard. However, the Great Depression hit the interests of both companies pretty hard. The British government offered them 9,500,000 pounds sterling as an advance to help them out provided they merge which they did in 1934 with 62% of the shares belonging to Cunard and 38% belonging to White Star. In 1947, Cunard bought the balance of the shares then liquidated the remaining ships and assets of the line. By 1950, White Star had ceased to exist.

Source: Titanic, End Of A Dream by Wyn Craig Wade, pg 335

Hope this helps.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Gavin Murphy

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To add to Michael's excellent response above: If I remember correctly, the name was revived by an English solicitor recently, although I could be wrong on this. Don't know type of co., but some tangential conntection to the T as far as I remember. I think they might have been involved in Edith Haisman's 100th birthday celebration in So'ton.

Maybe the British members out there can clarify.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

G
 
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Susan Markowitz

Guest
G'morning, All!
Thanks to Michael and Gavin for the WSL info, that was most interesting. Earlier this year, I received a letter from Cunard's Legal Department advising that they own the rights to the "White Star Line" name and trademarks (and declining to permit us to use same for our "Titanic_2000" logo). Perhaps they're planning to use them themselves in the near future, or maybe they're just trying to crack down on those currently using them without permission (or paying royalties :)).

There was a period of time in which the merged lines were advertised as "Cunard-White Star", before becoming simply "Cunard". Mark Baber is the expert/ship historian I've always looked to for such info, but he's on vacation at the moment (lucky soul!).

As an aside, for those interested in a relatively inexpensive piece of White Star and/or Cunard history, eBay, the auction site, frequently sells magazine and newspaper ads for their ships, which can often be had for as little as a few dollars. A nice, inexpensive piece of history. (There are more expensive items, as well, but caution is urged, and a warning to read descriptions carefully, to be sure the item is authentic.)

Regards to all -- Susan
 
Jul 9, 2000
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The only revival of the White Star name that I'm aware of is one of those cracker outfits which claimed they were going to build a replica of the ship.

Their website hasn't been updated in two years (Shrug)

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Mark Baber

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Here's a "short version" history of White Star from the time it was sold by IMM in 1926.

In November 1926 White Star was sold to Lord Kylsant's Royal Mail Group for £7 million and a new company, White Star Line, Ltd., was created to own the stock of Oceanic Steam Navigation Company. The Royal Mail Group, though, collapsed in the early 1930's and White Star again became a separate company. The line posted its first-ever loss in 1930 as a result of the combined effects of the Royal Mail matter, the worldwide economic depression and US immigration restrictions, and continued losing money after its separation from Royal Mail.

Meanwhile, Cunard was also reeling from the Depression and the US immigration curbs. To avoid the bankruptcy of both lines, the Government agreed to provide £9.5 million for a merged Cunard White Star Line: £1.5 working capital; £3 million for completion of Queen Mary (on which work had been suspended in December 1931); and £5 million for construction of Queen Elizabeth. On 1 January 1934 Cunard White Star, Ltd., was created, and the merger became effective on 10 May; work on QM resumed almost immediately.

Cunard owned 62% of Cunard White Star, Ltd.; the other 38% was owned by, or for, the creditors of OSNC. In 1947, Cunard acquired that 38%, and became the sole owner of Cunard White Star. Finally, on 31 December 1949, Cunard took over the assets and liabilities of Cunard White Star and the name "White Star" completely disappeared. White Star's colors and burgee remained alive, however, until Britannic III made her final round trip to New York in November 1960.

Sources: Anderson's White Star; de Kerbrech & Williams' Cunard White Star Liners of the 1930s; Green and Moss' A Business of National Importance; Haws' Merchant Fleets; Mallett and Hall's The Pirrie-Kylsant Motorships; Moss and Hume's Shipbuilders to the World; The New York Times for various dates in 1926, 1927, 1933, 1934, 1947, 1949 and 1950; Oldham's The Ismay Line.

MAB
 
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