What caused the damage to the stern?


Apr 26, 2017
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The 'big piece' was reportedly blown off the wreck when the ship broke in two. Perhaps the air pressure was building up inside which caused the portholes to break and blow right off the hull, even the wall mounts that secured the portholes at each end of the hull piece have been blown right off. It must have been a terrific expulsion of air.



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there are accounts of passengers saying they heard an explosion . but such an explosion couldntt have occured. the theory that the stern pushed on the bow when she broke. so where would this peice come from. was it from the bow or the stern?
 
Apr 26, 2017
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The stern was pulled down against its will by the bow. The air did not have time to expel and the stern imploded. When the bow partially broke on the surface the water would rush into the broken end and down the forward grand staircase and also down the opening after the forward funnel fell. Survivors near the forward boat deck were sucked down by the water rushing into the bow section and were blown out again by the air as it expelled out. Lightoller thought the water was rushing down the ventilators and into the boiler rooms causing the boilers to explode. Lightoller - "I was sucked down, and I was blown out with something pretty powerful when the ship went down.....this explosion, or whatever it was, took place. Certainly, I think it was the boilers exploded. There was a terrific blast of air and water, and I was blown out clear."


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thank you
 
Apr 26, 2017
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How heavy were both Grand Staircases? I doubt they be strong or buoyant enough to have much effect (I have seen the 1997 incident but don't think that was major enough).


a couple of tons at most. they did have still wiring in the frame (in the real thing) the wiring is actully still evedent on the wreck. but the whole coming up and and floating. is most untrue. in reality it is far more likely the grand staircase (the forward one)when down whith the ship. or broke free later in the decent to the sea floor. the aft one however . its fate is less clear. but with the sighting of the barber pole in the waters after the wreck. its likley it was destroyed in the breakup
 
Apr 26, 2017
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A thought -- As the stern went down, air had to come out. Otherwise, it would have remained buoyant and might still be floating. That air was compressed by the sinking of the stern. How much? I don't know. However, motion pictures of ships sinking (mostly WW-II torpedo victims) that I have seen often have hatches blowing open and other signs of compressed air "exploding" outward. Could compressed air up the 3rd class stairway have damaged the poop deck? Maybe, or maybe not. But, the result would have been an increasing "blast" of air in that space.

As to what scientists say, they are human and sometimes toungle their tangs. I suggest that Alicia attempt to contact the people involved. I've had great success with polite e-mail inquiries.
The only signs of the ship exploding with air was at the surface. When deck cranes came loose. And cargo hatches popped out. But that's it. Any air still in the stern went down with the ship. Causing the implosions still evident on the wreck today
 
A

Aaron_2016

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We also have survivors who saw the stern pivot around after she broke and face the opposite direction. e.g. Lightoller - "The ship had turned around while I was under the water." Jack Thayer was on the collapsible boat when he saw the propellers looming right over him and he thought they would come down and smash the collapsible to pieces. The stern must have swung around as it was being pulled upwards by the submerging bow. I recall a survivor who described the ship moving forward as she went down. Perhaps the amount of water rushing into the ship caused her to push forward a few knots as she went down?



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Apr 26, 2017
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True it is more than likely the ship pivitoded as she sank. But I doubt there was enough enternal suction to pull her forward. I believe she would have been plunging. Her propellers clearing once more as she rapidly fills with water.
 
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Kyle Naber

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Oct 5, 2016
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thank you. i am full aware of titanic honor and glory and in fact follow them closley . but i still wonder ..... you say the bow torpedoded down .. with ease but when she leveled out . and hit the bottom there must have been still some air. or was it all lost when is contacted with the sea floor

All of the air pockets would have imploded at a depth of about 300 feet, meaning that absolutely no air would be left at the time of impact with the sea floor.
 

Kyle Naber

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Not even a drop......I wonder what happened to any bodies trapped with the bow?
On the way down, ear drums would have exploded with the pressure and possibly eye sockets? Within weeks, all flesh would be eaten away, and years with bones. There aren't any remains today.
 

Cam Houseman

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Jul 14, 2020
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water passage through the ship on descent, corkscrewing, the impact, at maybe around 45 MPH, and the stern didn't stop corkscrewing, so there's a bend around the Second Class Smoking Room, which would explain why it doesn't exist anymore

the Stern's starboard side exploded outwards, because of the force of impact, and everything on the starboard side of the Stern was ejected, bed springs, tiles, walls, hull, light fixtures, plates, cup, rope, Turbine Room equipment, you name it. its a real mess!
I put in a screenshot of an area in the ejecta debris field from NOAA 2003 footage
Stern Starboard side More surviving Red and Cream tiles!.JPG
 

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