What did passengers do during Cherbourg stop


Hitch

Member
Can someone please tell me, what most of the (first class) passengers where doing when Titanic was standing still in Cherbourg?
What was open, and what not?

Thanks
.Carl
 
Probably nothing more then the usual activities they enjoyed while the ship was underway. The Titanic didn't remain in Cherbourg any longer then was needed to pick up some passengers after which she got underway for Queeenstown. I wouldn't be surprised if a few shutterbugs took some photos, but beyond that, it was just more of the same old thing.
 
R

robert s hauser

Guest
Moderator
"Probably nothing more then the usual activities they enjoyed while the ship was underway. The Titanic didn't remain in Cherbourg any longer then was needed to pick up some passengers after which she got underway for Queeenstown."

Dear Michael, to get slightly of the track of that last thread about what passengers in Cherbourg were doing, I've been wondering on how much of a navigational challenge it must have been to get a 900 foot liner out of port in darkness with no radar, or GPS, or anything except charts and the stars. I think its amazing that they could do these things so routinley. Those change overs in Cherbourg and Queenstown must have been quite taxing for the crew and deck dept., don't you think.? Just wondered of you had any ideas. Thanks---Rob H
PS Sorry about my abominable computer skills, I'm still figuring this out.
 
I'm not familier with Cherbourg, but I think you'll find that there was a lot of experience backing up the work. Most all of the people assigned to an Olympic Class liner had previous large ship experience and the Titanic had officers from the Olympic to add to that.

Having said that, manuevering in restricted waterways can be a substantial challange even with all the aides you mentioned. That's one of the reasons any ship entering or leaving port will do so under the supervision and direction of a harbour pilot who knows the waters cold. Going into Cherbourg they at least had the advantage of some remaining daylight. Leaving, they would have to rely even more heavily on charts, sightings of landmarks, sharp lookouts and good judgement. In my own experience and observation, this is toughest of all on the people on the bridge as these are the people who have to evaluate information from a lot of sources and make some fast decisions. These people know that if the screw the pooch, they are the ones who will end up in the hotseat at the inquiry that follows.

For what I think are obvious reasons, when the sea and anchor detail was set for entering and leaving port, the navigation bridge was a place I avoided like the plague. These people had a lot on their plate and didn't need the likes of me underfoot.
 
I imagine part of the difficulty with this would also be the lights of the harbor, would it not? I remember something that Mike said on another thread about the necessity of having only one light, and that a dim one, on the bridge precisely so those on duty could retain night vision. I understand this was twilight, but even so any light would have been some distraction.
 
>>i imagine part of the difficulty with this would also be the lights of the harbor, would it not?<<

Maybe, but not for some of the reasons you may think. Lights from bouys and other landmarks and navigation aides wouldn't tend to dazzle anyone as it might from a source on the ship itself. The catch is that visual conditions can be very misleading when poking around in the dark. Think about what it's like driving around at night in an area that may be familier to you...you travel that road everyday...but now it's dark, the fog is rolling in, you may have icing on the windshield and even if it's not, something grabs your attention for a second...oh, and is that a right or left turn ahead?

You get the picture.
 
D

Doni McLerran

Guest
Okay, I know the original question was about the first-class passengers, and Father Byles was in second class, but while they were stopped at Cherbourg, he apparently had enough time on his hands to write a letter to his housekeeper at his parish back in Essex:

Byles: "On board ship one has little to do to fill up time so I start to write a letter to you which will be posted at Queenstown to-morrow morning. ... before coming out of supper we had stopped at Cherbourg, and the tender was just coming alongside with passengers. ... At the time of writing (7.45) we are still stopping at Cherbourg...." (Letter to Miss Field)

Which brings me to wonder what a second-class passenger (not necessarily a priest, but just an average passenger) did to pass the time.
 
My next trip to Europe is going to include Cherbourg & Queenstown (now Cobh). I cannot wait. Then I'm done. I was born in NYC, I've been to So'ton, & then the final two ports of departure.
 
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