What does captivate you about Titanic


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Emily Bisignano

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I probably couldn't answer that question because my response would be way too complex. I love absolutely everything about that ship. When I fist saw the movie in 1997, I was immediately hooked. The Titanic completely captured my imagination. Further in my research it made me truly understand the people on the Titanic, the disaster itself, and just the ship in general. I have a heck of an imagination to capture and the Titanic did a heck of a job doing so.
 
Jan 31, 2001
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Hello Emily,

As I have said before, it is the players of the tragedy that captivate me. The officers, the crew, the Thayers, the Carters, the Ryersons, Thomas Andrews; they all captivate me. I own a binder with a biography for nearly every passenger and crew member of the ship. I read them like a book.

As for the sinking, I will repeat myself when I say that I feel the events of April 14/15 were a "had to have been there" experience. There are so many fine details and rumors that are purely ficticous about that night and morning, that it is hard to picture just what it would have been like there. To see the reported shooting stars, to feel the cold night air, to actaully walk down the Grand Staircase and touch the carved oak ballasts, to be put into a small lifeboat and placed into the vast North Atlantic without much hope of rescue, or to die an untimely death at the hands of the forward funnel; these are things that no book or movie could ever recreate. It is all these things and more that captivates me about the Titanic.

-B.W.
 
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Jane Green

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What captivates me about the Titanic?

She was an emblem of the beginning of the end of a very elegant and relatively relaxed and complacent era.
I love the elegance of the ladies (unlike Rose: I hated the very modern American scene of her and Jack practising long distance spitting into the sea, as I just think a girl like her simply wouldn't have done it, and a young man like Jack wouldn't have pushed his luck that far, especially when he'd just met her).
I love the gentlemanly and heroic behaviour of the majority of the men. Can't see that happening nowadays, somehow.
I love the sumptuous surroundings, so different to the plastic coated, vulgarly decorated, disco-infested cruise ships of today. Wouldn't it be something if they built a ship, maybe not as big, but as elegant and refined, as the Titanic? But without a disco, or gaudy shops and decorations. somewhere where you could get a feeling of stepping back in time (minus the iceberg, of course).
Something like the Orient Express, where you are expected to dress in smart full evening dress for dinner, and smart day dress for lunch. I probably wouldn't be able to afford it myself, but it would be lovely for a dream voyage type thing.
I haven't forgotten the steerage passengers. they are probably one of the other reasons that people are fascinated by the Titanic. Poor people, looking for a better life, and probably not entirely informed as to the gravity of the incident until it was too late. Many of them not understanding a word of English. Imagine their frustration and anguish,
I was interested in the Titanic long before the latest film came out, so it isn't due to Mr Cameron on my part. And certainly not due to Leonardo di Caprio.
Anyone read THE TITANIC by Wyn Craig Wade?
 
Jul 9, 2000
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<FONT COLOR="ff0000">>><FONT COLOR="119911">Anyone read THE TITANIC by Wyn Craig Wade?<FONT COLOR="ff0000"><<

As matter of fact, I have. I'm also halfway through reading the entire unabridged transcript of the US Senate investigation. Why do you ask?

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Jane Green

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I asked because I am currently re-reading it (I've had it for 20 years, so my copy is hopelessly out of date, in that the Titanic hadn't been located, let alone photographed, when it was printed). I like the way it is put together, and find William Alden Smith an interesting character, or as Taft put it "A bobbing sort of a cuss".
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Quite a persistan inquisitor too. I've been reading the Senate transcript in part to help a shipmate research a book he's trying to write. The way he just hammers at a witness is classic trial lawyer stuff. I have to wonder though if some of his questioning techniques would be legally acceptable today.

There are several lawyers who haunt this board. Perhaps they can offer some insights on this.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Jul 9, 2000
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I'm still wondering. I don't think they could get away with it in a criminal or civil trial (Badgering the witness, questions asked and answered and all that.)Not today anyway, but an inquiry may be a different matter. Looser rules.

Hello lawyers on the board! Help us with this! Please?
happy.gif


Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Okay Emily - - You ask me what captivates me about Titanic? The people are what captivate me about Titanic. I love the people. And the people of Titanic include the people of this Board. They all captivate my attention!

Hear ye! Hear ye!

Teri
 
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Katie Sharrocks

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Don't know really. Its a mixture of lots of things-the people, the era, the whole angst thing
 
Jul 9, 2000
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I suppose there are a lot of things that get me interested in Titanic. There are, of course, the technical aspects which I go into all the time, the forensics, the snapshot of a people of a given era, their differences from us and also the surprising similarities. The inquiry transcripts are an example of that, revealing as they are of the spin doctoring those involved tried to put on the whole bloody mess.

Some of the intrigues to be seen here are all too familier.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Stacie Crowther

Guest
This is a good question, yet very difficult to answer. There are so many captivating aspects, the ship itself, the characters on board and their different social levels, the millions of things that went wrong, the arrogance, immigration laws, the other ships around etc..

Everything that could have gone wrong did. Maybe if just 1 thing didn't everyone could have survived or the iceberg would have been missed altogether. All these things went wrong:the binoculars weren't aboard, not enough boats, the bulkheads were too low, engines being reversed slowing down the turning of the ship, no wind to make bergs visible, it being a blue berg, the water being so cold, the Californian not responding, the damage occurring on the side of the ship rather than head-on causing too many compartments to flood, no boat drills....etc
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Hi Stacie, in accident investigation, there is always a chain of events which lead up to the accident itself. Break any of the links in the chain, and the accident doesn't happen.

The lack of binoculars wasn't really a factor as they arten't very useful for searching. I've learned this from personal experience having stood low visibility watches. What binoculars are good for is making out what an object is after you've spotted it.

Engine reversal in a turn; It's extremely unlikely that this happened. Boxhall is the only witness who claims the order was even given, and that from a converstation he heard between Captain Smith and Will Murdoch after the event.

The Californain was likewise ex post facto to the accident itself. From all that I've seen, it's very questionable that she could have arrived in time to do much good, even if she had actually picked up the distress signal itself. Recall that she was trapped in the icefield and threading their way out of it would have been a time intensive and dangerous operation. Then there would have been the problems of intership transfers by boat with inadaquate seamen and equipment to do the job.

On the damage to the ship; Ed Wilding, if I recall stated that she would likely have survived a head on collision. It was, as you noted, taking the damage on the side that was the killer.

Bulkheads too low; No question about this one. Higher bulkheads might not have been enough to prevent the loss of the ship, but they would certainly have bought them some desperately needed time. Nor is there any question about too few boats. I would add that they waited too long to start evacuating the ship. That was why only 18 of 20 got away befor she went down. The last two floated off as the ship sank.

Another factor, cruising too fast. The navigation team was not unaware of the icefield. One of the reasons for going 10 miles further south was to try to avoid it. Unfortunately, it wasn't enough. Had every ice warning made it to the bridge, I suspect they would have been more prudent. I can't say this is a sure thing in light of contemporary practice which was to go with the pedal to the metal in all conditions save poor visibility.

This brings up yet another factor; radio dicipline. Rather cavalier in those days. Had the Californian's operator cut in with the formal code indicating an official message, the Titanic would have recieved the crucial bit of information about the ice they were steaming towards.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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lisa bruner

Guest
The Titanic intriguement. Something so huge and beautiful created by man, but yet man failed to save her...and her lost passengers. The idea of any one person to believe she was unsinkable intrigues me enough. All the history of her is coming to life again. I can not believe that other ships stood still...as she descended from the sea's mouth to the dark cold bottom of its belly. Taking with her many lives of all ages and even the unborn. I have a great fear of water..more so respect I should say. It's a sad quest to gather all the truth. However, a rewarding one.
 
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David R. McCann

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What captivates me?...
I became interested in Titanic after seeing the movie "Raise The Titanic" I did not know much about her at the time, so my curiosity was peeked. I imagined, until her discovery, that it might be possible to raise her and bring her in to New York Harbor. Alas, we now know that is not probable. Over time, I've become captivated by the people, the events leading up to the collision and the aftermath. She is a lady full of mystery. She met her demise almost 90 years ago yet, thanks to the discussions on this site, we are still learning about that fateful night. That is what keeps me captivated.

Best,
Dave
 
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