What does your family think of your Titanic obsession


Lisa Kraner

Member
May 26, 2005
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Actually my family (my husband and son) support me in whatever I do) whether it be participating in little league or the titanic......and they are kinda of interested with the whole Titanic thing too! I guess I'm lucky
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Jun 22, 2005
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I have earned the title "Ubergeek" from my significant other, owing to being able to remember so many titanic facts <sigh> Tough work being a geek, but if that's what I am, I'm so happy to find this site and find out I'm not alone! P.S. He did break down and buy me a titanic piece-a shirt that says Titanic Swim Team---arrrrrgghhh.
 

Kyrila Scully

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Apr 15, 2001
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South Florida
My family are great enablers of my obsessions. That's why my collections are so large. I think it's because gifting is the only way they know to show any affection.

Kyrila
 
Dec 2, 2000
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My workmates know my passion and ask me questions all the time. You should have seen the bemused expression on one guy's face when I pulled out my deck plans today and explained to him why the icecube tray theory just doesn't work.
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Dec 3, 2000
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Niagara Falls, Ontario
I'm the only one in my family who has a real interest in the ship. My family is very supportive and they have bought me gifts for Christmas and my birthday, although they haven't in quite a while due to the fact that they think I have everything, when it comes to the ship.

They have shown some interest in it though.
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
I've always disliked the term "buff"--isn't there something else that's more appropriate for all our mutual titanicus obsessiveness. Suggestions anyone? Like 98% of us out there I got hooked on A Night to Remember (book and film). Also I loved the short lived Time Tunnel series especially the first episode Rendezvous with Yesterday with captured the Titanic brilliantly. However, at first, I usually kept the interest fairly well hidden to guard against what I perceived was the inevitable ridicule and snickers which accompanied my somewhat eccentric hobby. Anyone else feel the same way?
 

Ed Weichsler

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Feb 4, 2004
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In the beginning, asking my family for acceptance was asking a lot.
For almost 40 years, it was (in the eyes of others) a macabre fascination, that made no credible sense. That was of course B.C. (before Cameron). During that time, my ascension into Titanic was pretty much, a closet affair. No one outside the family knew about it. Interestingly, my family became "enablers" to my so-called sickness. They would purchase anything & everything "Titanic". Many of those "gifts" were things I would never walk across the street for, i.e. towels, tapestry, cookie jar, S&P shakers, but once in a while they would find that elusive publication that I couldn't.

Like everyone else, all this changed with Cameron. Then it was permissable. Mainstream acceptance meant that those impossible to find items came out of the woodwork & prices sky-rocketed. Before, I couldn't find them. Now, I can't afford them. Now the family brags about "Grampa's latest acquisition, or his next presentation at some local school (promoting a Library card or literacy). I tell the children the two greatest sources of information are libraries & those, whose opinions are different from yours (the latter forces you to review your positions for a factual basis).

Life A.C. (after Cameron) has been much better. In retrospect, my life has been richly blessed, having met many of the survivors, authors, developed friendships with many rivet counters
(including you too, George), and receiving tips from total strangers like "did you hear that such & such will be on TV tomorrow", or "there was a book at a garage sale I picked up for you. I hope you like it."

There are those who dream (as I once did) that, to fully take in the Titanic, one must visit the wreck site. I don't take that position anymore. Ask any student of the Civil War when & where it comes to life? They all will tell you..."..at a battlefield or cemetary". Seventeen years ago, I walked the three cemetaries in Halifax, closing my eyes at each one. The screams were real, it was all real, I was there! I have yet to get over it.
My family now understands............
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>However, at first, I usually kept the interest fairly well hidden to guard against what I perceived was the inevitable ridicule and snickers which accompanied my somewhat eccentric hobby. Anyone else feel the same way?<<

Naaahhhhh...not really. Curmudgeon that I am, if people have a problem with my interests then that's exactly what it is: Their problem. Not mine. It's not like I force it on them.
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Jason D. Tiller

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Dec 3, 2000
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Hi Ed,

"Seventeen years ago, I walked the three cemetaries in Halifax, closing my eyes at each one. The screams were real, it was all real, I was there! I have yet to get over it."

I visited the cemeteries four years ago and it was very emotional, so I agree. Seeing all those graves, was when it really hit home for me and I was then able to fully appreciate the extent of the disaster.

Having said that, I still do dream quite often about visiting the wreck.
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
I sort of got the impression growing up that my family ignored my Titanic interest, certain as I got older, I'd grow out of it. Also, I learned to keep the Titanic under wraps at school and home--discretion was the better part of valor. I learned to keep A Night to Remember discreetly out of sight, lest I be subjected to merciless ribbing over this eccentric interest in some long ago shipwreck.
 

Teresa Parks

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Sep 9, 2007
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I've been interested in Titanic since 1986 when I did a report about in school. Since then I can't get enough of it. What do my friends and family think? They all know it's my thing - yeah some make fun at times - but in a good natured way. Everybody has their own thing whether it be NASCAR, Pink Floyd, or Star Trek or whatever they all know mine is Titanic . . .
 

Steve Olguin

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Mar 31, 2005
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When I was younger, I had several teachers who hated the fact that I was interested in Titanic. Several term papers and book reports said "No more Titanic!". A few teachers encouraged it, and even had one teacher who asked me to present a whole presentation on the subject... All day was "Titanic" day... even watched a (heavily edited) copy of "Titanic" (bringing the movie to about a PG rating). Family members are convinced that I was aboard the "Titanic" in a previous life... they encouraged it. My grandfather would always keep a look out on TV for any documentary on the subject or on ocean liners in general. My interest in the ship took a back burner when I entered high school... as I think I had burned myself out on the subject.
 
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Jeffrey Beaudry

Guest
My family is probably the most mainstream, non-excitable group imaginable. This would explain why when they found out I liked Titanic, they thought I was nuts. I'm probably the only on in my family that has a hobby. Except maybe my sister's old enjoyment over Lizzie Borden (makes you wonder, doesn't it?).
 
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Trevor William Sturdy

Guest
During the week just gone I experienced a funny little Titanic story within my own immediate family that I would like to quickly share.

I have recently seperated from my partner and was fortunate enough to have my 2 young children come and spend the night at my house last wednesday. After putting my 18mth old daughter to sleep I was sitting on the lounge with my 2&1/2 year old son who wanted a book read to him. Thinking that now is as good a time as any to start educating him, I pulled my copy of "Titanic An Illustrated history" out of the bookcase(it has the most pictures) and began going through the story. All was good, and my son being the little sponge for info that he is was repeating things back to me and seemed to be enjoying the story and then off to bed he went. So you can imagine my surprise(and a touch of pride)when calling up my ex yesterday to have her start the conversation with the words "That bloody ship". Apparently after picking up the kids from daycare the next day a little voice from the back seat started reciting how "Titanic hit ice mummy, Titanic broke and sank mummy"......A new generation is born....

Proud Dad.
 
Jun 18, 2007
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My parents have tolerated quite well all of these years. All right, so I drove my mother crazy at seven years old trying to find a book about it, and I wouldn't stop asking her questions. But that passed, and when I was supposed to (if you want to call it that), I found my own books.

I try not to bring up my interests to most people. But on the occasions I've brought up the Titanic, I received negative treatment, to say the least. The worst question came from an ex: "Why are you so interested in dead people?"
 
Aug 15, 2005
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My mother encourages me (to an extent), my father tries to convince me that the 'Riddle' theory is true, my sisters keep on asking me about my fascination and my brother thinks I'm a right sad-act for coming on the internet to discuss the ship with your good selves.
I never bring up Titanic in conversation with friends because it just isn't appropriate natter for the pub.
 

Teresa Parks

Member
Sep 9, 2007
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Isn't it sad that for every Titanic enthusiasists, there is someone out there who doesn't get it? In all seriousness, I don't understand why the fascination doesn't grip everyone like it does me & all the rest of us. There is not a week that doesn't go by that I don't cruise the internet looking for some long forgotten pictures that someone may have found somewhere. I just can't get enough - history still grips me the way it did when I first heard about it.
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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I find that not over-taxing the subject is helpful with friends and family - an approach that goes for anything with which you have an interest that others do not necessarily share. I'll mention it in a work-related context when I can draw an analogy or if it is relevant to a subject under discussion, and I'm often asked questions by those in my circle of friends who know of my research, but I try to resist the temptation to discuss it at length. Nothing more dull than the convert trying to convince you of the fascination of a subject you're not interested in. It can turn indifference into outright hostility to the subject. On the other hand, if someone is interested or disposed to learn more, you can introduce more information to them or inspire a desire to learn more.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Wise words, Inger. None of my hobby interests (of which Titanic is just one) is ever mentioned in conversation unless somebody else introduces the topic. I have friends who have no idea that I have such interests (especially those who have never been to my house and seen the books lying around!) and conversations with them don't go beyond areas of common ground. Likewise they don't bore me by holding forth on football or gardening or whatever turns them on. I even have friends who are professional historians and we enjoy long conversations about the Edwardian period in general or even 1912 in particular, with no mention of a certain ship. If I want to 'talk Titanic' I can always come here and converse with friends who won't be bored rigid by the subject!
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michelle rowlett

Guest
I have been interested for a long while with Titanic, but more so since i have had access to a pc, which has opened up a whole new world for me, especially all things Titanic! I have recently purchased a 39 " model of the Titanic which was not cheap, my sister thought i was mad to have spent it on a boat as she put it!! when i could have had quite a few expensive bottles of purfume !! My dad though does indulge me!! Each to there own i say.
 

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