What happened on the starboard side of the bow from 140 AM to 210 AM


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After the Collapsible C lowers, there is a large time gap from 1:40 AM-2:10 AM on the starboard bow. Why did they not get Collapsible A down between this time period and what happened to Murdoch and Wilde at this time period? Opinions, please.
 
J

João Carlos Pereira Martins

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Hi Lester!

I believe in that resource but if it's really true there is a significant time gap in the same way. Boats 13 and 15 were lowered, I suppose nearly 1.40. So what happened in the starboard side during this 20 minutes? I imagine the filling of boat C to be quite calm and rapid. In Cameron's film we see this part of the deck completely empty and a confused and panicking crowd in the opposite side.

Best, JC
 

Jason D. Tiller

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In Cameron's film we see this part of the deck completely empty and a confused and panicking crowd in the opposite side.

If I may offer a piece of advice; James Cameron's movie is not considered a reliable source and neither should it be used as such. You're better off with sources that are much more dependable, such as the inquiries and the article of the launching times of the lifeboats, posted above.
 

Paul Lee

Member
A Night To Remember, JC's Titanic, Ghosts of the Abyss, SOS Titanic and (I think) the 1996 mini series all show Ismay's mode of escape wrongly.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Hi Paul,

I don't regard Cameron's film as final testament to what happened, although others do.

I quite agree with that statement. Some people do look at Cameron's film as the final word on the disaster, when it's not. They either refuse to look at other more reliable sources, or they just don't realize they exist and are easily accessible.
 
J

João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
I agree with your opinions, Cameron's film isn't a source, not at all. The movie could be done much better than we see but I referred that just hoping that JC did the minimum research in this delicate issues, not to guide wrongly the public's ideas.

Best regards, João
 
A quirky stat is that whilst there isn't a single third class passenger launched in #4; just 10 mins later Coll C is launched almost exclusively crammed with third class passengers (the dynamic duo excepted).

Can anyone explain why in a very close snapshot of time (1.50am - 2.00am) the forward starboard part of the ship has a deluge of third class passengers whilst the forward port side seems bereft of them??
 
Paul

ET names 35 confirmed survivors in #4 not one a third class passenger. If there were third class passengers in #4 can you provide the names and supporting evidence to ET so that the list can be updated.

I'm aware #4 was loaded from A deck but the passengers came down from the boat deck prior to loading. Why were there no (or hardly any) third class passengers in amongst the first & second class? If we assume for now that there were third class passengers in #4 the numbers must be relatively small when you consider over 90% of the passengers in Coll C are stated to be third class (again confirmed by ET).

Note. I'm not suggesting there were 0% third class on Port and 100% in starboard merely that there appears to be a significant imbalance between the two sides at the forward end of the ship at roughly the same time.

Therefore my question (deluge v bereft) remains.
 

Paul Lee

Member
Sorry I mistyped. Boats C and D had third class in them, whereas boat 4 didn't. This was because boat 4 was loaded from A deck, and I don't think the third class would have traipsied down from the boat deck.
 
"I don't think the third class would have traipsed down from the boat deck"

Umm. Like the Titanic I don't think that one holds water.

To help stress my point let me present another set of stats covering the launch of the last 10 boats. During a 45 minute window between 1.20am and 2.05am the following 10 boats were launched:

1.20 - Starboard #9 (3 confirmed third class)

1.25 - Port #12 (2)

1.25 - Starboard #11 (5)

1.30 - Starboard #15 (36)

1.30 - Starboard #13 (29)

1.40 - Port 10 #(5)

1.45 - Port 2 #(6)

1.50 - Port 4 #(0)

2.05 - Starboard Coll C (37)

2.05 - Port Coll D (9)

Total third class passengers boarding boats in this period = 22 in 5 Port boats & 110 in 5 starboard boats. In my eyes this 17%/83% split represents a significant imbalance.

The stats seem to show that for some reason the third class passengers mainly congregated on the starboard side.

During this final critical period with the head well down I envisage the third class passengers beginning to arrive on the boat deck in increasing numbers. Those arriving after 1.30am would have found no boats remaining in the davits on the starboard side but with #10 and #2, plus #4 hanging over the side, still present on the Port side. Would the arriving passengers not have automatically made their way towards the remaining port boats and thus have been present to fill Coll D in more significant numbers?

And yet between 1.30am and 2.00am only 11 third class passengers were loaded into the 3 remaining port boats - #10,#2 and #4 with only 9 finally getting into Coll D, the majority (37)clearly congregating around coll C.

Any tangible reasons that may explain this away?
 
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