What happened to the binoculars for the lookout tower


Status
Not open for further replies.

Will C. White

Member
Apr 18, 2007
267
2
123
Robert-Are you talking about the time travel thread? If so, my point was just because it looks like a Brownie on the outside doesn't mean it can't be loaded with 1600 push or IR film on the inside. You'd be amazed at what you can photograph through a night scope as well.
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,643
809
563
Easley South Carolina
>>Still, they'd probably be much more efficient than the Titanic 1912 type issue.<<

Since modern instruments have the coated lenses which tend to gather light, you would be correct.

>>Probably the old "SE Radar" is best...that is to say "Sailor's Eyes."<<

They worked well enough for me that I did all my scanning with them. The few odd times I tried it with binoculars, everything passed by in such a blur that an Imperial Star Destroyer could have materialized in front of me and I would have missed it. The lesson wasn't lost on me.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Will C. White

Member
Apr 18, 2007
267
2
123
"I hope not, Admiral Solo, we can't repel fire of that magnitude!" Not even with the Iowa!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
May 3, 2005
2,599
289
278
Will C. White-

>>Robert-Are you talking about the time travel thread? If so, my point was just because it looks like a Brownie on the outside doesn't mean it can't be loaded with 1600 push or IR film on the inside. You'd be amazed at what you can photograph through a night scope as well.<<

That was my point. (See "Professor Smith and the Time Machine" on my website: johnwpaige.com/robert)

Or you could wear a Bowler Hat...You know-something like Cal Hockley's... with a miniature camera concealed inside it and never arouse any suspicion...Just don't lose your head...or your hat ! (LOL)....I read somewhere that some of the film used in the Titanic explorations was somewhere in the range equivalent to 100K+ or more ASA.
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,643
809
563
Easley South Carolina
>>I read somewhere that some of the film used in the Titanic explorations was somewhere in the range equivalent to 100K+ or more ASA.<<

Robert, I take it you're talking about film suitable for low light photography. While I know a thing or two about ships, I'm afraid I'm a bit of an ignoramace when it comes to photography. Perhaps you could tell us how this all works.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads