What Happened to the Forward Engines?


A

Aaron_2016

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I understand the forward engines fell out of the ship when she broke in two. Do we know where the engines are on the sea floor?


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It appears they ripped out the keel underneath them. Were they bolted to the keel or simply held in place by their weight? Is it possible that water rushed into the compartment and the weight of water caused the heavy engines to smash straight threw the floor plates and break the ship in two? Is it possible that the heavy list to port caused the forward engines to rip up the keel underneath them and smash over to port, crashing threw the hull on the port side and breaking the ship in two?



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coal eater

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very interessing,do we have more other titanic engine remains pictures? especially the broken off pieces and other engine-related debris?

what happened to boiler room 1 and boiler room 2?
 
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very interessing,do we have more other titanic engine remains pictures? especially the broken off pieces and other engine-related debris?

Yes there are images from them in the debris field.

what happened to boiler room 1 and boiler room 2?

Not sure what you mean with the question. Boiler Room No. 2 is at the break area of the bow, all 5 double ended boilers are still in place.
The 5 single ended boilers of Boiler Room No. 1 are in the debris field all close to the stern.
 

coal eater

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where can find if posible all engine debris images? im curious about missing cylinders and crankshaft
 
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A

Aaron_2016

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where can find if posible all engine debris images? im curious about missing cylinders and crankshaft


Engine room machinery resting on the sea floor. A low pressure engine cylinder.


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It is unknown if this fell out when she broke, or crashed through the side when she listed heavily to port.

Survivor Percy Keen said: "It appeared to us that when the ship listed heavily to port the engines fell out and crashed through the side. The second funnel broke off, and killed a number of people in its fall."



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coal eater

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how many cylinders were found in debris field? any crankshaft pieces were found? what about engine telegraph did they find it or it was integral part of engine column and it still there?

fate of turbine room and dynamo room?

what about steering machinery?]

one side of stern is ripped open and not all decks are collapsed it appears that turbine room is collapsed,thats why exploration of said room was aborted? (we know they tried to do enter throught engine room WTD but they found only wall of rust ndicating the WTD closed., do we have the photo of wall of rust in ER to TR ? and what about wall of rust on BR2 to br3 ?
 

Jane Smith

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The steering machine, which was on C Deck behind the 3rd class rooms, was destroyed.

Only the 2 forward cylinders on both engines ended up in the debris field near the stern. I’m not entirely sure about the engine telegraph or the crankshaft pieces.

I think the turbine engine was destroyed when the water burst in that compartment.
I’m probably not the right person for this but I don’t think there is a photo of the walls of rust in the turbine room or BR3.

I know there are pictures of the reciprocating engines, BR1 boilers and BR 2 boilers. I don’t think there is a picture of the turbine engine in the wreck
 

Tim Aldrich

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David, I've been questioning my way of determining motor or engine since my last post. Way back in tech school my instructors hammered "Motors are electric" into our heads and I used that for a long time as it, generally, makes sense. Hydraulic motors don't fit into that category though. Then I thought up "engines make power and motors are driven by power." It also makes sense but can be nit-picked as well because the power really doesn't come from the engine (gasoline, diesel, steam engines) it will come from combustion of some sort of fuel. Sometimes the combustion is in the engine, sometimes it's not. Maybe I would have to say "Motors = no fire, engines = fire".
 
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Jane Smith

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I think Titanic's reciprocating engines ran on the steam from the boilers. The boilers, created steam from the coal that was fed into it.
I think the turbine engine ran on steam but I’m not sure
 
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Rancor

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You actually have quite a good understanding of the propulsion system compared to some others I've talked to.

You are correct the turbine ran on steam also, in this case the exhaust steam from the main engines. This system greatly improved the overall efficiency of the engines.

If you are interested in this subject may I recommend this article from Samuel Halpern Titanic’s Propulsion Plant

And also this one by Stephen Carey Cold Starting the Titanic
 

Mike Spooner

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Internal combustion engine yes, as an external combustion engines sounds more like of an explosion engine in progress!
I was brought up motors were electric. But American will call there gasoline engine under the hood not the bonnet as motor!
Hydraulic motor is an odd one but still is hydraulic usual driven by a hydraulic pump. Why have the two in the same system! I worked for over twenty years on this system driving a large pinion and gear 20 foot diameter turn table via a two speed gearbox. The reason given gave a greater toque range from zero to 25 rpm almost at instant speed. Then used as a brake to stop rotation movement by reversing the hydraulic fluid in the pump. Stop a five ton load in one second with out any friction brakes been used. Course azimuth movement within in two degrees of the compass followed by fine azimuth movement of 0.5 degree accuracy of one degree. All within two half second. Running 24 hours 7 days a week. All Electronic controlled to.
Very tricky to set up to run smoothly but when running right poetry in motion.
I would of thought the azimuth pod propeller on today ships used a electric motor to drive the propeller blades and a similar hydraulic system to turn the pod clock or anti clock wise.

Steam is generated by boilers were the high pressure is used in the high pressure cylinder first then the exhausted steam still with heat and pressure is recycle into the next cylinder intermediate, then recycle again in to the lower pressure cylinder and final into a condenser.
in a triple expansion engine the exhausted steam recycled drops in temperature and pressure coursing the steam to expand in volume. Hence the three different diameter cylinder bores. High pressure cylinder 54" diameter. Intermediate cylinder 84" diameter and lower cylinder 97" diameter times twice.
You can see a fine sample of the worlds largest working triple-expansion been steamed up next March 16-17 followed by another six times this year, at Kempton Steam Museum south east of London near Heathrow airport. The engine is 800 tons as against Titanic 1000 tons. But still give you a good impression how big this engines were. A fine sample the workings of a steam turbine can be seen to without steam. High pressure steam turbines also recycle there exhausted steam to.
 

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