What if it happened to Olympic

Dec 29, 2006
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In purely technical terms the Olympic would obviously have gone down just like the Titanic, but I suspect that the crew may have performed more cohesively and therefore more effectively during the evacuation stage. Having said that, the Titanic was a brand new ship with a new crew and, under these circumstances, it could be argued that her crew members did as well, if not better, than might have been expected.
 
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Alyson Jones

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Stanley-You made me think here.
Olyimpic had a more experence crew,so if it was the olyimpic that was floundering,i would think alot more passenagers would of been placed in the life boats cause of the more experence crew members?
 
Dec 29, 2006
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I am suggesting that a more cohesive and experienced crew would have been more likely and able to have directed passengers, particularly the third class women and children, from their quarters on the lower decks to the lifeboats. This would necessarily have saved more people, but it would have made it less easy for first class men to have entered the boats because "there were no more ladies".

I suspect that, in April 1912, many of the Titanic's stewards were still trying to find their way around the ship, and would not have known the best routes to the boat deck.
 
Mar 22, 2003
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This to me seems to be pure speculative nonsense. The problem is that there was no process in place for how to handle passengers should the need arise to abandon ship. By 4 days out the crew were well familiar with the ship and how to get about.
 
Dec 29, 2006
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Speculative? Certainly - this whole thread is speculative. Nonsense? I am not so sure; would, for example, a third class steward who had served for only four days on an Olympic class vessel have been familiar with the first class areas?
 
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Alyson Jones

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Din't Captain Smith cancal the life boat drill onboard the Titanic before the ship departed?

On the Oylimpic did captain Smith have an life boat drill before she departed?

If so maybe that would make a big difference if it was Oylimpic that nite
 
Dec 29, 2006
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I don't think lifeboat drills were considered important in 1912 - certainly not on the Olympic and Titanic which were considered to be "virtually unsinkable" because of their system of transverse bulkheads. The general feeling seems to be that, if the Olympic had struck the iceberg the results would have been more or less the same.
 
Mar 22, 2003
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>>would, for example, a third class steward who had served for only four days on an Olympic class vessel have been familiar with the first class areas?<<

Familiarity of 3rd class stewards with the 1st class accommodations is not the issue. The issue is would 3rd class stewards know how to direct their passengers to the boat deck? The answer to that is YES!
 
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Alyson Jones

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But how can the English crew member direct an non English speaking passenger,while all the signs are in English? The English crew member and the non English speaking passenager can't understand each other?
 
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To get to the Boat Deck you must go through first class areas,or second class, though. There were a lot of non-english speaking people, too. So yeah, that wouldn't be good.
 
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Alyson Jones

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I heard that that night there was alot of trouble for non english speaking people to find the boat deck.Rocky you have any more information?

Cheers
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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If understanding English was an asset for survival, why did the English passengers in 3rd Class have one of the lowest survival rates? Possibly because those who understood and obeyed instructions from the crew were most likely to be doing the wrong thing, as those instructions for too long were "Don't go to the boat deck by any route. Wait down here." The Irish, who understood but often chose not to obey the instructions, had double the survival rate of the English.
 
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Alyson Jones

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About English 3rd class passengers having the lowest survival rate, this could be an reason.
Since Titanic was English ship,maybe the 3rd class English passenagers trusted the English crew and there English ship there for staying put, while Ierish passenagers did not get along with England and the English never intended to listen to the English crew!Therefore causing English to have an lower survival rate.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Exactly. The English in general had trust and respect for authority. They tended to form orderly queues and were used to taking orders - or waiting for them. Many other nations had nothing but suspicion for authority and believed that if you didn't help yourself nobody else would do it for you. In 3rd Class on the sinking Titanic, that was a pretty good maxim.
 

Bob Read

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Mar 3, 2002
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It is my understanding that rather than having inexperienced stewards, etc. that many member of the crew had transferred over from Olympic precisely because of their experience. If they had served on Olympic for 10 months I'm sure they were very familiar with the ship since most aspects were virtually identical.
Regards,
Bob Read
 
Dec 29, 2006
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The crew of the Titanic were hand-picked from the Olympic and other White Star vessels. The ex-Olympic crew members would have been familiar with each other, and with the layout of an Olympic class ocean liner - the others less so. Stewardess Violet Jessop stated that the "staff" were "composed of men from the Olympic and others ships in the company - all picked crew".

On a footnote, and thinking of Alyson's previous post, I had always considered that the Titanic was an Irish ship, rather than a purely "English" vessel. I would suggest that this view was shared by William McQuitty (the producer of A Night to Remember) and many other people from the Belfast district.
 
Mar 22, 2003
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>>To get to the Boat Deck you must go through first class areas,or second class, though.<<

Not really, many of the 3rd class stewards had their quarters on F deck near a stairway that went up to the working alley on E deck. From there there was a stairway that ran all the way to the boat deck used by the crew to get to the various decks in between. All the stewards would have known the way. As Bob Read said, many members of the crew had transferred over from Olympic precisely because of their experience. Anyone unfamiliar with things would soon find out quickly from the those that already knew where things were. The idea that most 3rd class stewards didn't know how to get their people to the boat deck is completely without foundation. Many also had lifeboat assignments. The real question is command and control. Apparently, the getting of passengers to the boats was being worked in real time. There was no advanced plan in place as far as I'm aware of.
 
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Alyson Jones

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Standley yes i knew she was built by irish people in ireland and design by irish men but she was registration under Britain and she was flying an British flag and officers had to be British.
The Oylimpic class liners were always classed as British.
Why do you think The Irish dispite the English?
I would dispite too if my country build an huge ocean liner than the mother country clam it as being English!lol
 
Dec 29, 2006
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Hello Alyson.

You originally said that the Titanic was an "English" ship, rather than a British one flying the British flag. The British flag, also known as the Union Flag, is the flag of England, Ireland and Scotland, represented by the crosses of St George, St Patrick and St Andrew respectively. The men who designed and built the ship would not have argued about her being British, but I think they might have been a bit annoyed if anyone had described their creation as an "English" vessel!
 
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Alyson Jones

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Titanic is a British Ship,just because Irland built it that does not mean Titanc is Irish!
The new British Transilatic ship the QM or is it the QE with R Warick as captain was actually built by the sweeds or finns in there ship yard,but it's still classed as a British ship.