What if Titanic and New York had collided


liam forber

Member
Mar 8, 2006
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does any one think that the disater could of been stopped if titanic had got struck by i think it was called new york ship

[Moderator's Note: This thread, originally placed in a different subtopic, has been moved and renamed. MAB]
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>does any one think that the disater could of been stopped if titanic had got struck by i think it was called new york ship <<

It was the S.S. City of New York (Later remaned "New York") and which you can read a bit about at http://www.greatships.net/newyork.html

Whether or not a collision between the two ships would have been enough to stop the Titanic's maiden voyage is questionable and would depend on how serious the damage was. If it had been nothing more then a little scratched paint and a few slightly dented plates, probably not. If any through hull damage had occured, I would think that Titanic's voyage would have been delayed to make things right.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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One can speculate all day. If Titanic had departed on time, by the time she reached the ice, the berg would have drifted south, past the point where she hit it.

Titanic would then have either hit another berg, or run at 22 knots into the field ice beyond. She might have got away with that.
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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And if the platers had gone on strike for a month back in 1911 she would have missed the fateful berg by miles and we could all be off and doing something useful.
 
D

David Haisman

Guest
I've always thought that the ''near miss'' between Titanic and the New York to be the fault of the Harbour Master. I also think the owners of the vessels with their double banked mooring arrangement of the New York and the Oceanic were to blame as well, due to the ''cavalier fashion''in which they had left their ships moored.
From 43/44 berth to 38 berth,(Dock Head) the distance is only about two to three ships lengths away and there has always been a speed limit. This of course is for the displacement surge and wash caused by large vessels on moorings and gangways etc. to those ships tied up alongside.
Masters and Pilots are naturally fully aware of this and even if a speed limit wasn't in force in Titanic's day, good seamanship was.
From the bouy '' Gymp Elbow'' off of the Ocean Dock, 43/44 berth, down to berth 38, the deep water channel would have been more restricted at the berth where the two ships were moored back in 1912.
From off of Berth 38, all ships make an alteration to their course and steer for the ''Hook Bouy'' off of Fawley Refinery. This would have meant that mooring in a double banked way on this berth would have made both vessels extremely vulnerable to Titanic's displacement surge.
There must have been a ''singled up'' mooring arrangement of the two vessels for one to break away from her moorings. When vessels are double banked and moored up in such a way, it is usually the case that apart from springs, back springs, and short ''nips'', doubled up head and doubled up stern lines should also be made fast ashore from the outboard vessel.
I'm almost convinced that if this had been carried out onboard of these two ships, then the speed of the Titanic over such a short distance (if that was the case) may have parted a line or two but both vessels would have remained alongside.
This mooring arrangement would have been an insurance requirement when I was at sea.
You can find more on this on my article in the ''Voyage '' journal.
 
D

David Haisman

Guest
Hello Liam,

There have been lots of myths, coincidences, superstitions and omens with the Titanic story.
It can be difficult what to believe if you are that way inclined.
I don't think the temperature of the water would have made any difference, once the electrical supply came into contact with the water.
I hope that helps a bit,

Best wishes,

David
 
Feb 24, 2004
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>>One can speculate all day. If Titanic had departed on time, by the time she reached the ice, the berg would have drifted south, past the point where she hit it. . . .

It's also the kind of speculation that can lead to a certain degree of madness. "Oh, if I'd only left the house 5 seconds earlier, or 5 seconds later, that idiot wouldn't have rammed my car." It's a beautiful example of 20/20 hindsight, but since it was unpredictable in the first place, of little or no value. Check out the film, "Run Lola Run" (in Germany, "Lola rennt").

Roy
 

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