What part of Titanic's interior seems to retain the most paneling


Feb 14, 2011
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Based on Ken Marshall's and Parks Stephenson's 'riveting' writeups of the 2001 Cameron expedition to Titanic- which part(s) of the interior seems to be in the best of condition?

The crews hospital, under the forcastle, with medicine still on the shelves, sounded particualrly intact.

The 1st Class Reception Room, with intatct paneling and leaded glass windows in place seemed to have survived the ravages of the deep- and Ismay's cabin still had wood, defining walls, a wardrobe, etc.

What part of the interior seemed to reflect the LEAST ammount of decay since 1912?

My vote is the 1st Class Reception Room.

The silent room seemed remarkably intact.

Hopefully next time a nook can be aquired in the Turkish bath- no doubt the teak paneling is still intact..

Regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
Apr 22, 2012
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I've heard (and it does seem this way) that the deeper into the ship you venture, the more intact it is.


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
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Stefan Christiansson

Guest
That sound really interesting! Why is that?
Is it because the current is much less, deeper inside the wreck?
 
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jonathan joyce

Guest
They are all correct. The deeper you go inside the wreck the less current there is to pull materials apart and to introduce harmful bacteria that would otherwise thrive at the top section of the massive hulks. I would personally love to see pictures or a documentary that ventures deeper inside the wreck than Cameron did. Can you imagine the wealth of architecture that still could be intact in the lower reaches of the ship!!!!! Its enough to make me giddy. I'll keep my ears and eyes open for any new info on this topic
 
Mar 3, 1998
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After watching the ROV footage from the 2001 expedition, I would make the case that the Marconi Silent Room is the best preserved room yet explored in the wreck. The entire Marconi transmitting apparatus is still in its original position, each component still connected into the transmitting circuit. The switches and settings for the apparatus are still in their original positions. There is no other room in the wreck so far examined whose contents are as undisturbed.

Having said that, the same can be said for the lift machinery room. However, in my mind, the Silent Room is of more historical interest.

The rooms in the forecastle suffered less damage, but their contents were scattered. There is a fascinating amount of surviving wall paneling and leaded glass in the Reception Room and Dining Saloon, but most everything else that served a functional purpose in those rooms has all but vanished. The reciprocating engines are, of course, still in position, but most of the ancillary equipment in that space were either smashed or are otherwise missing. The boiler rooms might have survived relatively intact, but we only have video of the after side of one.

Given the sentiments expressed in the posts above, I find it ironic then that the room that in my mind survived in the best condition is virtually the highest in the wreck. I have observed as much damage from the sinking and the onslaught of deep marine life in the farthest reaches of D Deck as there is up in the Officers' Quarters.

Parks
 
May 9, 2001
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Parks, I'm so glad to hear about the level of preservation of the wireless equipment. I am always interested in hearing more from you regarding how the Titanic system was different from Olympic and other vessels of that time.

Also, with the presence of the wireless equipment, could you tell if there was any other items that might belong to either Phillips or Bride? Or items of other significance?

Yuri
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Yuri,

I will describe Titanic's wireless apparatus in nauseating detail in my book, due to hit the streets about a year and a half from now. You'll get to see a re-creation of Titanic's (not Olympic's) Marconi rooms before that time, though, when you go to see the film "Ghosts of the Abyss" or read the book of the same name.

But let me clarify one thing...there are no areas of the wreck that look like 1912, with just a layer of dirt on top. The floor of the Silent Room is buried under about 6" of silt and debris. The wooden cases housing some of the Marconi components are eaten away, exposing the electronic innards. Iron machinery is covered in rusticles. Components originally mounted on the walls have now fallen, as the walls themselves, with only one exception, have wasted away. Only someone who knows what the equipment looked like when pristine would recognise the shapes in the debris. I would say it took me over 20 viewings of the same video to find and identify all the surviving components. The Marconi Room and the operators' Sleeping Quarters contain nothing recognisable...the entire area was swept clean and the contents therein scattered. I believe that I have identified the valve tuner switchboard as far away as Stateroom Z. There are no personal effects that can be found. The only personal touch lies in the switch positions left on the transmitting apparatus.

For all the salvage debate, there is still much to learn inside the wreck. I have been in contact with the company historians at Marconi plc and the information Cameron recorded far exceeds their corporate knowledge about Titanic's apparatus. Subject matter experts are examining footage taken in other areas of the wreck and they are learning more than anyone ever predicted they would. It has become quite apparent that Titanic was not a carbon copy of Olympic...differences are being found throughout the wreck. More on this will be forthcoming in "Ghosts." I would rate Cameron's 2001 expedition as being almost equal to Ballard's 1985-6 expeditions in terms of the amount of new information yielded. I say, "almost," because nothing tops
finding the wreck in two pieces. Ballard brought back a good description of the wreck's exterior...Cameron brought back our first comprehensive look into the interior.

The roof of the Officers' Quarters is in danger of imminent collapse. Before that happens, I would like to see the Marconi equipment removed and restored to operating condition. Not only does it represent the only known existing 5 kW marine station in the world, but it is arguably the most famous. The motor-generator and disc discharger are intact and apparently undamaged; if they can be removed, they can be restored to full operating condition. If you think hearing Titanic's whistle blow once again was a miracle, imagine hearing again the same spark that once produced Titanic's death cries. Having seen the ever-widening holes in the roof of the Officers' Quarters, I am even in favour of removing the roof in order to extract the historically-significant apparatus underneath. Otherwise, we will forever lose any chance of ever hearing Titanic's voice again when that roof collapses. My worst fear is that we will discover that has already happened by the time we are able to once again visit the wreck.

So, no...there was no body of a stoker anywhere to be found. :) As for anything else...well, I don't want to steal anyone's thunder, including my own. Ken's wreck report contains all the information that we have permission to make public at this time.

Parks
 

Adam McGuirk

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May 19, 2002
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Which of the suites would you say where in the best condition? Obviously the ones in the bow section, but where exactly are they?
Adam
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Passenger suites are not my expertise. With most of the interior walls down, the staterooms all ran together and looked to my eye to be just a jumble of washstands, bed frames and assorted knick-knacks half-buried in silt. Ken Marschall and Don Lynch spent a lot of time identifying individual staterooms and the contents therein. I don't want to steal their thunder by going into specifics. Unlike other areas of the wreck, there were identifiable personal effects visible here and there in the passenger areas. Again, I would direct you to Ken's wreck report for more detail.

I don't remember any of the living quarters in the bow section being explored. I have seen it stated on the list that there are areas of the ship that are better preserved than others. This may be true, but not to the extent often expressed. 90 years is plenty of time for deep sea organisms to find their way into the deeper part of the wreck. Not to mention that the entire ship went through some severe trauma as it sank and subsequently hit bottom. Yes, the bow filled slowly with water and sank, but it also slammed into the ocean floor with terrific force. Yes, there are areas that are considered to be in good condition, but overall you're looking at a decaying corpse. That's not to say that there aren't some real treasures to be found for those who are intent on looking.

For those interested in woods, it has been my observation that teak wood has fared the best in the wreck. But I'm no expert on that subject. It's just something that I happened to notice.

The reason why the transmitting apparatus in the Silent Room survived is because the walls of the Silent Room were of double thickness, with asbestos sandwiched inbetween for soundproofing (hence, the name for the room). The adjacent Marconi Room had no such protection, hence its near-total devastation. The lift machinery survived because it was surrounded by steel walls (the same could be said for the W.C.s, too). Interior wood partitions didn't fare as well....most were down. This is both good and bad. Bad, because the staterooms are now communal; good, because the ROVs had easy access.

Parks
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Then with teak wood having survived, I suspect once the Turkish bath is explored- with its teak paneling- It will prove to be as right as rain...

regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
Jan 5, 2001
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where was the big refrigerator?. If was the steel It should be well preserver. I believe that it was in the deck G. is it possible it still have any food........
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
You'll find spaces for refrigerated cargo and stores on the Orlop Deck as well as G Deck. Unfortunately, there is just no way any of these spaces survived the crushing pressure of the water as the ship sank. The cork that was observed among the wreckage bears graphic evidence of these spaces imploding.
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Parks, has any of the silent room equipment from Olympic surivied? If indeed Titanic posseses the only survivng 5 kw station, and is in imminant threat of destruction due to a collpasing overhead, mabey it should be recovered and restored, but preferabley by an organisation that will not spend years trapped in litigation and self destruction.

Any way James Cameron can stake a claim on the wreck if RMSTI succeeds in forfeiting its salvage claim?

And if the equipment is recovered..i hope its done...gently, and not ripped from the wall...

What components are unaccounted for? If some bits are as far away as stateroom Z, who knows what else was knocked out of place...

One would think if the sediment were cleared or vacumed away, the remanants of the table, and key upon which the distress call was sent out might be found.

Im hoping this past expedition just was one to scratch the surface- We still need to see the boiler rooms, turkish baths, etc.....


Tarn Stephanos
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Tarn,

Neither I nor my contacts at the Marconi Company know what happened to Olympic's apparatus.

There is one other 5-kW station that I can think of out there, but it's lying sideways.

As far as I know, Cameron is not interested in establishing salvage rights. My impression is that he is more into the exploration, forensic analysis and recording of wrecks. I could be wrong on this, though.

You'll get details about the Marconi Room and other areas of the ship when GotA hits the streets. Until then, Ken's online wreck report is about all that has been approved for pre-release, which is quite a bit.

I'll be glad to have this talk with you again after GotA comes out. Many of your questions, though, will already have been answered by the pretty pictures.

Parks
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Hi Parks!
Many thanks for the detailed response! Im assuming the 5KW sation that is lying sideways is on the Britannic wreck- id be surprised if any of that equipment is still fitted in place...

I am eagerly awaiting the release of the film and book, and certinly hope there will be a followup expedition to Titanic.....


Tarn Stephanos


ps- did other ships of the White Star line use marconi equipment totally different, or very similar in setup to what was used in the Olympic class vessels?

Makes me wonder if White Star liner 'Republic' wireless officer Jack Binns was using equipment identical to what Bride and Phillips used on Titanic.Then again, in the 3 years that seperated the sinkings of Republic and Titanic, wireless technology may have improved by leaps and bounds.

Thanks again! I always enjoy your postes!
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Tarn,

You said it yourself...the technology progressed and different ships received what was available. For many years, there was a "standard" 1.5-kW marine station for British merchant ships, but it sometimes varied in detail and in how it was installed in different wireless shacks. Originally, Olympic and Titanic were projected to receive the 1.5-kW set, as is evidenced by the section in Shipbuilder. Just before her maiden voyage departure date, though, Olympic received the new (for ships) 5-kW station with plain spark discharger. Titanic also received the 5-kW set, but instead of a plain spark discharger, she received the new rotary spark unit. This was typical during a time of evolving (and competitive) technology.

Jack Binns sent his famous distress call with a 1.5 kW set. Some components would have been similar in appearance to what Titanic would later receive.

Parks
 

Matt Simons

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Mar 12, 2005
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i definitly think with the remaining paneling on the walls and pillars, and the intact leaded windows, the Reception Room is the most intact room on the ship.

This is a kind of off-topic question but,
Did the deep sea preassure smash every light bulb on the Titanic,, because there seems to be no lightbulbs in any of the light fixtures that were found on the wreck. Is this also the case with the bowls that were used on the dinning room lights. There seems to only be the light base itself still there?
Thanks!
 

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