What started it all


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Matt Pereira

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Ohh, Michael, that whole rape scene completely came off as drama based just to get people into watching drama to watch it. I agree though it really did kill the movie cause I just didnt see how that can be of any importance, other than a way for that one guy that punched out the crew member during the looting they were doing cause he found out about the rape, but other than that I just think that was something that should have never been put in.
 
May 27, 2007
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What started my fascination with Titanic. Two words Walter Lord. SOS Titanic also made an impression. Television Docudrama of Titanic Eek!
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Beth Barber

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Jun 7, 2001
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I agree with Michael - that Titanic movie with Catherine Zeta-Jones had to be the worst one ever made. I thought that rape scene was ridiculous too - Tim Curry seems to play lot of "dastardly" villians - he seems to pull off playing those parts well.

We studied the Titanic when I was in school - I did a book report in 7th grade and after doing lots of research - I was hook about many aspects and wanted to learn more. - Beth
 
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Elissa Wendorf

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I was first introduced to Titanic when I was about 8 years old. I live in Massachusetts and my grandmother lives on Cape Cod. That summer I was down visiting her and we passed the signs for Woods Hole. I asked her what it was and she told me they explored the ocean. I was curious, so she took me to the museum and we saw the film about how they discovered Titanic. Ever since then, I've been hooked. My whole family, including my grandmother, thought I was a nut, but it didn't really matter to me because I found something I could connect to emotionally and intellectually. Now all I have to do is find someone who I can share it with =)
 
Feb 24, 2004
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ANTR in 1955. First as a Reader's Digest condensed book; then, the full-length book as soon as the town library received its copy. I don't think anyone else in town got to read it for a long, long time (my mom was head librarian, so I didn't worry about overdue fines). I wasn't allowed to see the film version, though - at that age, I was prone to bad nightmares. My parents wouldn't let me go to see 20,000 Leagues either.

Roy
 

Steven Hall

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Dec 17, 2008
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I also read the 'Reader's Digest condensed book' when I was young, but I've never read the actual book.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>but I've never read the actual book.<<

Give it a shot. It's not without it's flaws but it was the first really comprehensive attempt to accurately tell the ship's story. Not perfect, but a damned good start!
 
May 27, 2007
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You should Steve, like Michael said ANTR isn't as accurate as was thought when the book came out but it's still a great read. I still read it from time to time. Just read it like a novel.
 
Feb 24, 2004
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ANTR reads extremely well. Even a few people I know who don't like to read became caught up in it. Its history may have become a bit "creaky" with the passage of time and a considerable amount of new research and reappraisal, but I agree with Michael - it's still the best introduction to the Big T and her people there is going. And to think it's over a half-century old . . .

Roy
 
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Amie Hooper

Guest
I can't remember how old I was when I started to take an liking in the Titanic, all I know is that it started at a very young age. The primary school just down the road from me were giving away old books and somehow I ended up getting some and I still have them today. But there was this one book about all different types of stuff and there was one little article on the Titanic sinking and from there on I have liked Titanic, history and books.
 

Jeff Wilson

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Jan 28, 2008
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QUOTE: Tarn Stephanos

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Another moment that solidified my interest in Titanic was a when I was in 5th grade-I found a copy of Richard Boning's 1974 childrens's book 'Titanic' at school- the dramatic drawing on the cover of a sinking Titanic, with stern high in the air, prompted me to spend countless hours drawing similar scenes-Im sure after that point, most of my school work had a doodled sinking Titanic in the margins..
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Same for me Tarn. I read that book in 1978 in the 2nd grade. It was a part of "The Incredible Series". That series also contained a book called "Horror Overhead" about the Hindenburg and "17 Minutes to Live" which chronicled the collision and subsequent explosion of the Mont Blanc with the Imo in Halifax Harbor.

After reading that book I was hooked. I immediately went to the card catalogue (showing my age a little) , found ANTR, and the rest is history.
 
May 27, 2007
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I remember Card Catalogues as well. I used 'em enough. I never heard of that series of books. Guess that shows my age. I saw S.O.S Titanic in school
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and then went and found Walter Lord's ANTR. Then I got into the Lusitania. I didn't get into the Hindenburg til later on.
 
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At four years of age I saw the Cameron's Titanic and have been obsessed with it since. I feel a very strong connection to her. For a few years after I saw the movie, I would not let my Mom go fishing, for having the fear of the boat sinking. When the last survivor died I cried as if she was a relative, it sounds odd doesn't it. I'm known to have an 'old soul', I enjoy many things that most 14 year olds find quit boring like silent movies, ships, classic-classic music, dancing. I would of loved to live in that era.

How did your Titanic Days start, how has it affected your life?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>How did your Titanic Days start, how has it affected your life?<<

Honestly don't have "Titanic Days" per se. It just doesn't dominate my life. Don't get me wrong, the ship makes for a facinating study for a lot of reasons, but for me, it's a springboard for other maritime studies.
 

Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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When the last survivor died I cried as if she was a relative

The last survivor hasn't died. Millvina Dean lives in England.
 

Will C. White

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Apr 18, 2007
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Rocky-I live in a theosophical religious community, which considers reincarnation real as part of it's doctrine, so I understand the concept of "old soul", and there's too many odd things in life to absolutely bet against it. Titanic fascinates me, but she's still edged out by RMS Mauretania, the fastest ship on the Atlantic for twenty years. WILL
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Titanic Days started in Sept. 1970 My father bought me a picture history of ships as a 4th birthday present. One page account of the Titanic, with Lawrence Beesley quotes and familiar bow-on photo of the ship leaving Belfast. Photo of burned-out Morro Castle, which my grandmother recalled going to see, photo of the Lusitania which my great-grandmother had traveled aboard, and suddenly I was shipwreck obsessed. My parents encouraged that sort of eccentric behavior and my mother bought ANTR, paperback, and read it to me as bedtime reading over several nights. Two early epics of mine, from the fall of 1972, have been saved: we had to make a book out of black construction paper bound together with yarn; "tip in" illustrations we drew ourselves on white paper, and then have the teacher type out the story, which would be pasted on the opposing page. The fact that I chose the General Slocum disaster did NOT get me a recommendation for therapy (this was, after all, 1972) and...odd to say....it's really not that bad for something written by a six year old. Factually quite accurate.

My next effort, about the Lusitania, is far weaker, combining as it does plot elements from the Poseidon Adventure with the actual story of May 7th 1915~ that was my Pellegrino phase. By that point I had forced myself to read a book cover to cover in one sitting, to prove that I could (The Bobbsey Twins at Cherry Corners- the last piece of fiction I ever willingly read) and then set out to read ANTR on my own.

It had been read aloud to me perhaps 5 or 6 times by that point (November 1972) and, my first reading confirmed that which I already suspected....my mother was not above skipping huge blocks of text to accelerate the reading aloud process
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. She was good- always skipping the same sections, so I'd not notice- and so it was quite a revelation to discover so much more material.

Titanic,for whatever reason, seems to strike a resonant chord among children destined to grow up to be writers of research articles about shipwrecks.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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quote:

Titanic,for whatever reason, seems to strike a resonant chord among children destined to grow up to be writers of research articles about shipwrecks.
That's just as interesting as it is eerie that you say that, Jim, because I grew up somehow mystified by Titanic, although at the time I didn't know much about the real story. As I got older and older, I became increasingly curious about this mysterious ship and the people on her, so much so that I was driven to toward her.

For me, I would sit for hours and allow myself to become absorbed in photos of the ship and the people, imagining what it must have been like to be on her and what had actually happened to her. I am still like that, but I am motivated now by knowledge that I have attained. I haven't lost my imagination for it, but I let it carry me through a mental framework of known facts and even the speculation to see what kind of realistic possibilities there are associated with the ship and her legend.

Although I realize that she was only a ship made of steel and wood,, Titanic will always be a mystical being to me, with a personality all its own that contains an endless cascade of stories to forever enthrall me.

I knew early on that I would eventually grow up to research and write about Titanic, and now that goal has become one of my most passionate to achieve.​
 

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