What survivor clothing still exists

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David Seaman

Guest
Hi Shelley,
Thank you very much for posting these pictures, they are fantastic.
As I have said in previous threads, you are a gem (and always willing to go that bit further). Thank you once again.

Take Care
David
 
Kyrila Scully

Kyrila Scully

Member
Kate Phillips, who boarded the Titanic as "Mrs. Marshall," with her lover, Henry Samuel Morley, was given a valuable sapphire and diamond necklace which she wore to dinner every night during the voyage. The sapphire was an emerald cut gem surrounded by eighteen diamonds hanging from a gold lavalier from a chain. (It may have been the inspiration for the "Heart of the Ocean" necklace in the movie.) Kate wore the necklace off the ship, along with the sealskin pouch containing their trunk keys. They were passed on to their daughter, Ellen Mary Phillips, who was conceived on Titanic. She still has them, and Denis Cochrane has written a lovely little book about the "Marshalls," which includes a photo of the necklace and pouch.

All the best,
Kyrila
 
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David Seaman

Guest
Hi Kyrila,
Thank you for reminding me about the "Love of the Sea", I completely forgot about it. I saw it a few years ago at the touring Exhibit in Australia. On one sad point of correction, Betty no longer has possession of the Necklace or the purse. It is in a private collection (I dont think it is appropriate to point out the person publicly, but feel free to email me if you want to know who). They allow the necklace to tour the world and let others see it which I think is great.

Take care
David
 
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Randy Bryan Bigham

Member
To add to the list, THS has in its collection some clothing and other personal items worn or carried by Selena Rogers when she escaped Titanic. These include a green scarf and black dotted hat veil, two handkerchiefs, a tortoise-shell barette and hair comb, and a leather coin purse. THS has as well a copper bangle bracelet worn off the ship by Lillian Bentham. Photos of these items were featured in the THS journal, Spring 1991, pp 23-24.

Also the woolen coat worn by Marion Wright when she got off the ship has been preserved by her family. It is featured in a recent photo on p. 99 of the book "Titanic: Women and Children First" by Judith Geller and again, worn by Marion Wright on her wedding day (April 20, 1912), on p. 102 of the same book.
 
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Tarn Stephanos

Member
There are numerous rings out there, being worn by the descendants of survivors, and victims, whos bodies were later recovered. I recall one being the decendant of one of the mailroom workers, whose body was found, and his great grandson wears the ring that was on the body...

Plus there are watches out there as well. I know Isador Staruss's son wore his fathers watch , (that had been found on the body), I think JJ Astor's son wore his fathers watch too....\

regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
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David Seaman

Guest
Hi Tarn and Randy,
I seems that there may be a lot more out there than I first though.
Getting back to Betty Walker and watches, I understand that she still wears the watch that her mother wore in the lifeboat.
I would be interesting to know how many items are still in existance that family members do not know about.

Take Care
David

(Message edited by titanics on April 12, 2002)
 
Shelley Dziedzic

Shelley Dziedzic

Member
Franks Aks donated the white silk scarf and perfume bottle given his mother by Mrs. Astor to the Marine Museum in Virginia. Mr. Newell's Neptune Trident onyx signet ring is now with a grandaughter. For a time it was on display in front of the big model in Fall River Marine Museum (got a photo somewhere). His widow slept with his watch under her pillow every night. I have seen the Straus watch- of course there is some great controversy about the watch entrusted to Mrs. Haisman during her lifetime- it does not appear to be a man's watch. She, however thought it was- which is what was important.
 
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Trevor Powell

Member
To keep the ball rolling, I'd like to mention a few articles of clothing not previously referred to.
Dorothy Harder's fur coat, button hook (for her shoes) and a bottle of brandy are still preserved by her grandson.
The tuxedo worn by Frederic Seward is currently in the possession of his descendents.
Not exactly clothing, but the silver flask Richard Norris Williams had in his pocket is in the ownership of his grandson. There's a photo of it on his biography.
Mary Finck Davison's violet/blue skirt is still cherished by her niece, Marion. I understand Marion presented it in a few lectures she gave regarding her aunt. There was an excellent article published in 1998 which contained a photo of Marion wearing the dress.
The burgundy coat worn by Stewardess Mabel Bennett into lifeboat 5 was auctioned off at a British Titanic Society convention several years back. It sold for a mere $2,000.
The hat worn by Frederick Spedden on the night of the sinking is displayed in a museum, possibly the South Street Seaport attraction in New York City.
A Tiffany & Co. diamond ring worn during the sinking by Emma Bucknell was auctioned off in the midwest in 2004. It sold for $32,000.
Several pieces of valuable jewelry belonging to Charlotte Cardeza were saved by her companion, Anna Ward, along with a pair of salt and pepper shakers she took from her cabin. These are still owned by her family.
The ring worn by J. Bruce Ismay in collapsable C is still in existence. It was acknowledged in an article written by Senan Molony. The ring's inscription reads 'Be Mindful'.
The lifebelt worn by Lady Duff Gordon and inherited by her secretary Mabel Francatelli was auctioned by Christies, via Francatelli's grandson, in April 2007. It sold for $60,000. The lace apron purportedly worn by Francatelli during the sinking is preserved at the Merseyside Maritime Museum in Liverpool.
I understand a few articles of clothing saved by the Hayes's maid Mary Anne Perrault were sold through Sotheby's some time back. I don't know the specifics.
The leather gloves recovered from the body of Charles M. Hayes are/were displayed at the George Wright House Museum in Halifax as of 1996.
A fur wrap worn by Harriette Crosby is still owned by her family.
The signet ring George Widener put on his wife Eleanor's finger as she boarded lifeboat 4 was cherished by their grandson Eugene "Fitz" Dixon. When he died in 2006, he was buried wearing the ring.
A silver monogrammed brush belonging to Walter Miller Clark was purportedly saved by his wife Virginia. The brush is currently in my possession, having acquired it from the Clark's grandson.
 
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Trevor Powell

Member
Forgot to mention- Apparently Madeline Newell saved the heavy red sweater she wore that night. She refers to it in 1956 letter (available on her biography page). However, it appears to be lost now as the family doesn't have it in their possession anymore.
Elin Hakkairinen saved the necklace and bracelet she was wearing. They are now cared for by her daughter-in-law.
Victorine Chaudanson cherished the swiss watch that was pinned to her blouse as well as the steamer rug her employer Arthur Ryerson wrapped around her until her death in 1962. Her grandson now owns these.
 
Mike Poirier

Mike Poirier

Member
Hey Trey

Excellent posts. I didn't know half of this stuff. Funny, most Lusy survivor relatives all have 'the watch'....

Mike
Happy
 
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Trevor Powell

Member
Hi Mike, I'd be interested to learn of any clothing or lifebelts saved by Lusitania survivors and still in existence.

The outfit worn by Margaret Brown was, for a while, exhibited at the site of her birthplace (now a museum) in Hannibal. It's a black velvet dress with striped lapels.
Ettie Dean saved the clothing she and her children were rescued in. When she died, Bert Dean and his wife discovered them in a trunk. Unfortunately, because the moths had devoured the cloth, they disposed of the apparel.
There's a plaid steamer rug on display at the Southampton Maritime Museum that was purportedly given to a crewman in a lifeboat.
A British Titanic Society member owns the emerald and crystal necklace worn around the neck of Florence Angle that night.
Nikola Lulic saved the spectacles he was wearing. They are now owned by his grandson.
 
Mike Poirier

Mike Poirier

Member
Hi Trey

I had no idea about Margaret Brown. Hmmm... Lusitania... I do know that a few lifebelts were saved by Samuel Abramowitz and Patrick Hanley for many years. Mrs. Gwyer's camisole is on display in England. People saved paper items like letters, post cards, onboard newspapers- waterstains and all.
 
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Trevor Powell

Member
Interesting stuff, Mike. The Cunard Archives preserves scraps of clothing from recovered Lusitania victims. Specifically, there's a plaid checkered portion of fabric removed from an unidentified victim's trousers.

To continue- Selma Asplund saved the wedding band she was wearing during the disaster. Her husband's ring was returned to her as well, among his other personal effects. She treasured them up until her final days. The pair were sold at an Alrdidge Auction in April, 2008.
There's speculation that the fur coat worn by Amy Stanley still exists. Aboard the Carpathia, Amy was assigned a cabin after being mistaken as a first class survivor because of her stylish garment.

A bit off topic- A few years back, I was in correspondence with the grandson of a Republic survivor, who was a steward. He shared photos with me of the navy tunic his grandfather was wearing during the collision, complete with its original White Star Line buttons.
 
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Chad Goodwin

Member
How about the musical pig........wasn't it also in A NIGHT TO REMEMBER?????
 
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Trevor Powell

Member
Yes, Edith Rosenbaum's musical pig was left to Walter Lord along with the silk slippers she wore during the sinking. Apparently, she saved the dress she was wearing too, but it was, unfortunately, mishandled and lost with other luggage of hers at an airport in the 1950s. The pig mascot and slippers are now in the collection of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich.
 
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