What they wore


Status
Not open for further replies.
Jul 9, 2000
58,666
881
563
Easley South Carolina
>>mens fashion of course changes very little<<

If you mean for practical day to day clothing, I'd grant that you have a point. In terms of fads, men's clothing can be as outlandish as the ladies. Take a gander at the bellbottoms and the open suit jackets which were around in the seventies, as well as the hairstyles. Contrast that with the Punk Rock/Heavy Metal look which sprang up like a weed in the 90's and unfortunately, doesn't appear to have quite gone away.
 

Tom McLeod

Member
Sep 1, 2005
186
1
183
The Leisure suit days, we found one of those in my grandfather's belongings after he passed away, I still can't see him in it, he would have been in his mid 50's in the 70's. I do miss some fashion trends myself. Men wore hats, not caps more commonly until the 60's or 70's; some styles seemed pretty cool. It appears a lot of a cruise liner's officer clothing has stayed similiar to fashions of yesteryear. Let's hope Michael isn't admitting to having the old Leisure suit ready once fashions change again! Hardy LOL! Sorry that wasn't very nice.
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,666
881
563
Easley South Carolina
>> still can't see him in it, he would have been in his mid 50's in the 70's.<<

I can. it was very typical of middle aged guys who wanted to pretend they were in their late 20's or early 30's.

>>Let's hope Michael isn't admitting to having the old Leisure suit ready once fashions change again! <<

Not me. I'm a jeans, pullover pocket-Tee and ball cap kind of guy. You couldn't pay me to pull on one of those so-called leisure suits.
 

Chad Goodwin

Member
Aug 2, 2006
141
1
123
TRUE mens fashion was was diffrent in the 70s-90s.........the 70s had a revival of Edwardian fashion........albeit with a 70s twist.....but mens suits had changed very little before then.....it was either the width of the lapels or the cuff on the pant.......the 50s was a bit brighter with sharkskin suits and bold colored ties......me could get away with an untucked shirt and relaxed chinos on the weekend.....
 
Jun 11, 2000
2,524
26
313
I had always assumed that Brit & US fashions were broadly the same, but I have to confess that when it comes to a Leisure Suit, I'm stumped. I'm fairly sure we didn't take to these at all. My father in the 1950s had a Best Suit for special occasions, ordinary suits for work, and otherwise dressed in casual trousers he called 'flannels', shirt and a jumper. The men since, so far as I can see, leap out of a suit at the first opportunity into a variety of ill-coordinated comfy clothes. We are not a chic nation, sadly.
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Hello Monica,
We are not a chic nation, sadly.

Nor are we when it comes the the Leisure Suit. The Leisure Suit was a polyester monstrosity that did not need to be ironed hence it's popularity in the days before wide mass production of permanent press. I borrowed my Grandfather's Leisure Suit for 70's day in Highschool. I remember being either to hot or too cold in it. It was a nice dark navy blue version with a shiny polyester shirt that was red and blue. The Jacket had the same material inner lining as was used to make the shirt.
 

Tom McLeod

Member
Sep 1, 2005
186
1
183
The Beatles and/or Austin Powers seemed to have some chic fashion for the time. Or was that showbiz? George has admitted to the leisure suit. Could be fun for Halloween!
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Austin Powers wore a leisure suite. Looks like the '60s version anyways. It looked a great deal like what I wore for 70's day at school.
 

Chad Goodwin

Member
Aug 2, 2006
141
1
123
i was watching TITANIC with Barbara Stanwyck and the costumes make me laugh......love the way they took what appears to be late 40s clothing and gave them a 1912 twist.......Stanwycks boarding suit is very early 50s...but with a long skirt.......her evening gown when she is in the smoking room.......the rhinestone straps and the tulle wrap....very late 40s.........funny
 
Aug 29, 2000
4,562
28
323
I was surprised though, to learn gold lame was around in 1912- that evening coat she wears with the fur trim looked so Hollywood later on but I guess such things did exist for the avante garde gal with cash to burn.
 
Jun 11, 2000
2,524
26
313
I've come to the realisation that nearly everything was around before people generally think. It takes up to decades, usually, before stuff seeps into the mainstream of life and, by the time it does, the avant garde are usually chasing after something else. Washing machines, fridges, TVs - to name just three - were around well before WW2, and their origins often go back to the late 19th Century. Nearly every powerful country has laid claim to the invention of TV - Russia, USA, Britain, Germany etc., but it's origins are Russian and it's simultaneous appearance in rudimentary form in different countries is just a result of a worldwide scientific community chatting and exchanging ideas as usual, regardless of politics. Until war breaks out, or businessmen get wind of a patentable idea, that is.

So I'm not surprised to hear 'gold' lame was around in 1912, and I'd be willing to bet there was a Roman Emperor in the 2nd or 3rd Century busy telling his more technological slaves to work on a way to get gold leaf turned into cloth so that he and his wife could intimidate the Senate with their dazzling attire. It's a motif that recurs in folk tales. But once it's been faked and gawped at, it rather rapidly becomes a bit tacky of course.

I'm quite interested in why we all wear such terrible clothes today? Nearly everyone, away from work, collapses into sheer unfashionable comfort, yet 'celebrities' wear stuff that is so tacky and uncomfortable it makes you shudder.

Julia Roberts wore a 1930s/1040s gown (I forget which) to the Oscars a few years ago, and looked totally stunning. More of that, please, even if I'm a bit too old to join in the drive for elegance.
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Gold Lame was around in the Renaissance. Henry VIII met his rival the French King Francis I at the field of 'Gold Cloth'. I know gold cloth or lame was in use in Renaissance Italy from State Portraits I've seen.
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Feb 9, 1999
5,343
69
398
I have a few 1920s vintage outfits that incorporate gold or silver lamé. It was extremely popular in that decade, although there seems to be a stronger association in popular memory with the 30s. Like most older vintage, it needs care in storage - it is recommended that you store it seperately from other vintage gowns. Some lamé is prone to tarnishing and/or developing a darkened patina - this isn't regarded as a terribly serious flaw, and is common in the older textiles.
 

Chad Goodwin

Member
Aug 2, 2006
141
1
123
Oh Molly Dear.......that really isn't a flattering look for you.........lol......I would have given anything to meet her...she always reminded me of my grandmother
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Studying up in Gold Lame I found that is was a form of Gold Leaf, which was used in Roman Times then lost for a while (the dark Ages) to emerge again during the late 14th or early 15th century.

As for Mrs. Brown well if you got the dough you may as well flaunt it.
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
6,661
1,395
323
NewtonMearns, Glasgow, Scotland.
Hi there!

Not much of a fashion buff but the picture of Mrs. Brown evoked memories of old family pictures which I've had a quick look at.

I wonder if Mrs Brown's dress was black? I remember my Gran telling me about the victorian fashion of wearing black to copy the old queen - she wore black up until she died - in memory of her consort Prince Albert. Probably that's why her son prince Edward was such a leader of fashion.

The Edwardian look had a brief revival in the 1950's U.K. with the 'teddy boys' or as they were called in Scotland the 'neds'. I suppose the nearest thing to those guys in the U.S. was the 'Elvis' look.

These fine peacocks wore a strange hybrid outfit consisting of long, frock-coat like single button jackets with deep toned velvet lapels cuffs and pocket flaps. This was worn over matching a waistcoat and 'drain pipe' trousers which were so wrinkled - they looked like concertinas.
The colours were usually fairly 'strong' and would not have looked out of place on the 'yellow Brick Road'!
They also wore shirts with cut-away collars and boot-lace ties.
The outfit was topped with what was termed a bee-bop haircut which incorporated long side-burns.
The shoes were invariably enormous 'Titanic-like boats'- usually suede with massive thick soles made from a porridge-like substance we called 'crepe'
As my old Scottish Gran described them - they were 'bonnie looking chookies'. I hasten to add; I was not one of them.
The reason I so vividly remember the style is that I suggested to my parents I might like to wear such an outfit. I also 'vividly remember' their response!!!!!

The only fashion statements I would make about today - which I have no doubt will be classed as 'sexist' or some other 'in' PC description - is that in the days of Titanic men looked like men and women looked like women.
Nowadays most people are dull and boring - it is becoming very difficult to differentiate between the sexes. I'm almost sure some females wear 'Y' fronts.
The girls seem to have copied all the male bad habits and added a few of their own.
It seems to us older 'bods' people have to curse and chuck-off their cloths on TV or movies to prove the difference.
Having said all that Vive la difference!

Incidentally, I do know about Emily Pankhurst etc.
All you ladies out there: just look at Mrs. Brown's expression, what do you think is going through her mind?

Cheers,

Jim.
 
Feb 4, 2007
1,646
12
173
41
Denver, Colorado, United States
just look at Mrs. Brown's expression, what do you think is going through her mind?
At a glance, it appears that someone just stole her puppy, OR she just broke wind. Pure speculation of course.....

I would very much doubt that the Flapper dress 'our Margaret' sports in this image is black. Perhaps the luxurious fringe on the bottom hem is black, but not the main fabric.

Inger, Monica, All, what do you think?

That image of Mrs. Brown is part of the Western History Collection here in the Denver Public Library.

Another image of the same dress:

http://photoswest.org/cgi-bin/imager?10021703+X-21703

This image, also taken at Palm Beach, has "May 1, 1926" hand-written on its reverse, and gives us a good indication of when the other image I posted was taken. Here, the fabric of Mrs. Brown's dress appears a bit different. It might not be Lamé. The photo negative has been retouched. By whom I wonder??
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads