What would 16 year old girls wear on the titanic


Mar 12, 2007
3
0
71
would a 15-16 year old girl be dressed more as a child or an adult on the titanic (or just in that era in general?) what was the age for boys and girls when they would start to dress more as an adult, for girls being things like starting to wear corsets or wearing their hair up. anyone??
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
I want to say 15 to 16. It really depended on the girl's parents wishes as to when they could start wearing their hair up. Most Girls started wearing corsets around the age of 14 or so. I asked my grandmother about this because of your post and she told me that her mother was 12 years old when she started wearing a corset in about 1909 but that both of her sisters and cousins didn't have to wear a corset until they were around 14 to 15. I think it's safe to say that most girls were placed in corsets as soon as they started developing but couldn't put their hair up until 16-18 or just on formal occasions. My Grandmother stated that her Mother mostly wore a (corslet?). At least that's the way it was for my Great Grandmother. She didn't start putting up her hair and dressing like an adult until she went for her first interview for a teaching position at the age of 18. The job was really just as a Teachers Aide teaching 5 and 6 year olds. Hope this helps you Emmy.
 

Aly Jones

Member
Nov 22, 2008
1,174
70
183
Australia
To me it depends on you're family income.
If you're family are well to do,they seem to be dressed very smartly even if they are very young.
IF the family are poor they normally dress in rags.
 

Ben Lemmon

Member
Feb 6, 2008
525
4
123
Not to be rude, Alyson, but stereotypes will get you nowhere. I learned that the hard way on this site. While many third class passengers were immigrants with very little money, it did not apply to everyone. Some third class passengers were there simply to save an extra penny. And just because they were poor, it doesn't mean that they wore rags. My family was never very rich, but they did not wear rags. There are many dimensions to both the "well to do" and the "poor." A good example of what might have been worn is to look at old newspapers in a library. While searching for some information on the Titanic, I found an old advertisement of what might have been worn. Priced at around $5, it was available for quite a few families. I would say you would have to be extremely poor to be dressing in rags continually. Anyway, I thought I might point that out.
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,113
37
398
Yeah...a few things to ponder. There was a monetary requirement to enter the US. And, even at the severly reduced prices in ca 1900-1914 third class, passage wasn't cheap. So, the class of 'poor' who crossed was not of the variety who wore rags.

Ben is correct. Many of the third class passengers were solidly middle class, or even upper middle class. Mr. Robins, of Yonkers NY, and his wife Charity (both lost) had enough money on them to have occupied a first class suite had they chosen. (Check out his entry here on ET for the cash figure recovered from his body)

In the US, Britain, and portions of Continental Europe, "Ready to wear" clothing, priced in the pennies and styled to superficially resemble the tailor-made clothing of the well to do, had been common since the 1890s, at least. So, by 1912, all but the poorest had access to decent looking, if truthfully shoddy, clothing. Check out the often-reprinted 1908 Sears Catalogue for hundreds of examples of this.

One must also beware of basing opinions on the 'colorful' photos taken at Ellis Island and Castle Gardens. The reason that women with ethnic beads and garb, carrying their effects atop their head were so often photographed was that...by 1900...they stood out in the crowd for their rarity.

Hre are some Lusitania third class passengers in May 1912, from my collection:

huddled_masses.jpg


which is a good look at how the working poor dressed for travel. This was taken three weeks after the Titanic disaster and shows EXACTLY what the English, American and most European third class passengers would have looked like by day.
 

Aly Jones

Member
Nov 22, 2008
1,174
70
183
Australia
ben,Sorry- I was talking about the 1912 era,not our era.But it is true though how people income determon what peopl wear.I think in out day were more lucky cause we our familys get more help*goverment help and c-cards.Sorry if i offened you,it was not towards any member,it was about people in the 1912 era! Of cause there was middle class people travlling in 3rd class,there are called tight bums,we have them here in the mordern world aswell.But most of them were poor people.I to had grandparents that immergrated from England*not on the Titanic way after Titanic*and they had to sale everything just to buy there 3rd class tickets,ok they wern't in rags but they wernt in disigner clothes either.
If you got a 3rd class passenger and 2nd or a first class passenger from the Titanic and you'll see a big difference in clothes,but matbe the rags was a bit hursh towards other member's.If you had a 3rd class family member on board the Titanic ,i'm so sorry i meant to say just plain normal clothes of there day. For give me and my spelling Peace.
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
A lot of women would also tailor their husbands suits and also make their dresses from material that would be quite cheap and yet look quite expensive when they got done with it. Some men were also handy with a needle out of necessity
 
Jun 11, 2000
2,524
26
313
I reckon we're slobs now compared to previous generations. Well, I certainly am. I remember my mother getting changed and made up before my father came home from work (I hope he noticed) and she always told my sister and me about the importance of good foundations, by which she meant corselets or 'roll-ons' - which we both ignored, of course. During WW2 there was propaganda about looking one's best (females at any rate) in order to boost morale, and Rosie the Riveter was heaved on board to assure us here in the UK that after she'd finished riveting, she always looked her best. And from contemporary footage I've seen, they certainly tried.

I doubt if working clothes in 1912 were very good or attractive, but people had their best which they wore with pride, and which were long-lasting. And hats and gloves. I'm sorry hats have gone out of general fashion, as I like them.

I'm sure someone could (has) written a fascinating thesis about changing attitudes to clothes, class distinctions, celebrity-culture etc.

How handy are you with a needle, George?
happy.gif
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Howdy Monica,

I got a C in Home Economics. But I've improved though necessity. Decent enough work that I wouldn't want looked at to closely but at least my stitches hold.
happy.gif


I agree with you on the changing attitude in clothes even from when I was a kid in the 80's folks even then seemed more nicely dressed then they are now. I always remembered my Mom wearing either a skirt or dress slacks to work never jeans or khakis but Casual Friday came into being and took over the rest of the week. My Dad was either a logger or Mechanic but even he looked nice in a dress short tucked in and although he wore jeans they were always nice. I think the Casual thing really took of in the 70's. Most Pictures of my folks from High School in the early 60's were of them dressed for what looks like a special occasion when they were just messing around. Yes I think it was the 70's that started the casual look and then 90's grunge of which I was a devotee really fooled with folks perceptions of what looks decent. A pair of jean I owned were so holey they could of walked on water.
 
Jun 11, 2000
2,524
26
313
I got a C in Home Economics.

I'm very impressed, George. I never got further than cooking a cheese and potatoe pie, as I was transferred to the science stream and told to learn the Periodic Table by heart instead. I did continue at home, though. With the aid of modern sewing machines etc., but it wasn't too good, and still isn't. Even though I try, and it's something I would really like to be good at. My aunt was in the WAAF during WW2 and learnt to love 'modern' electronics, which she still does to this day - texting and emailing us all the time, even aged 84+. She was also brilliant at making clothes, so I feel extremely feeble compared to her. And she's still dressed up.
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
I was in Home Ec in Junior High and that was it. I remember enjoying Art more. Loved to sketch and draw and paint. I fell out of the habit though.

I remember cooking cookies in Home Ec and instead of flower we accidentally used powdered sugar. What a gooey mess that was. I don't know where I got that C from. I guess cause I got on good with the teacher. I do like to cook. My Grandfather worked at the Hotel which inspired Stephen King's The Shining in Colorado back in the 20's. Later on he ran a Restaurant in the 50s.

My Dad also was a great cook. I think that was on of the jewels in his cap when he married my Mom. She and also her Mother before her hated to cook. My Step-Grandfather was also a Cook. Seems to be a must for any man in our family to be a good or decent cook.
happy.gif


I hate using a sewing machine. I'm always afraid I'm going to put my finger in the wrong place while the machine is running. Although it hasn't happened yet I go very slow and creep along.

I hear what your saying about modern electronics. One lady in her 70's loves to text and says she feel incomplete with out her cell phone or computer.

My Grandma did War Work with my Grandfather cooking in Japanese Interment Camp in Iowa for a while but it was to depressing. So they moved to Ft Madison and got Jobs in a factory making shrapnel and explosives. Grandma was a (Gun) Powder Girl.
 
Jun 11, 2000
2,524
26
313
How very unusual our families seem to have been, George. Great (male) cooks in domestic circumstances; feisty grannies who either guided aircraft to safety or helped to blow people up; and neither of us seem to be able to use a sewing machine safely, but are put to shame by very elderly ladies who lived much more exciting lives than we ever will, and who still carry on.

Oh dear.
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Hi Monica,

How very unusual our families seem to have been, George.

Yep, they did what worked for them. Interesting a side Monica. My Grandmother who wouldn't cook would mow the lawn and Grandpa would do the dished because he had very fair skin and so was very careful about how long he was out in the sun while grandma was dark so she could be out all day but absolutely hated doing the dishes. Actually she hated kitchen work of any kind. It was the other set who worked in the camps. I find it funny this Grandma my mother's mother could of been a pampered house wife married to my Government Engineer Grandfather. But as I said she hated the kitchen and was happiest with Husband number two mowing the lawn and working a day job as an Engraver for pen stands and monuments.

Hi Alyson,

The only clothes I make are doll clothes for my daughter and those I'm just usually just repairing a ripped seam or re doing a hem which always comes out crooked.
 

Aly Jones

Member
Nov 22, 2008
1,174
70
183
Australia
George, that's really nice you make doll clothes for you're daughter.You do better than i'm doing,i can only stich by hand and that is not that neat.
I have tried to use a sewing machine but i sew the pant legs together and i could not put my leg though
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Alyson, Actually most of it's repairing stuff I got used and from friends with older girls who are done with Barbie. As any parent will tell you, Barbie ain't cheap. Thankfully my girl isn't into Brats yet. The price on those girls is out of sight.

Shoot I did make a coat out of red felt and my daughter who is three looked at it and then at me and her eyes said 'you've got to be kidding me'. She hasn't touched the coat yet. No will she. Can't say I blame her either. I'll just stick to repairing what friends give me or getting clone clothes even though most of that stuff is cheap trash.
 

Aly Jones

Member
Nov 22, 2008
1,174
70
183
Australia
There's nothing wrong with hand me downs,i got hand me downs aswell.The look when she does not want to hurt her father's feelings lol,my sister has got a daughter two&half years old.
Let's hope that you're daughter gets her passion for the Titanic,keeps the Titanic going through time.
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
Do a search on it. Type The Jazz Age or All Roads Lead To Ballyhoo in the search engine on this site and see what pops up.

Or find it like this.

How to find it.

First go to the Topics Page then go to The Gilded Age and then to Amusements & Diversions look at all the topics til you find The Jazz Age or All Roads Lead To Ballyhoo
 

Similar threads

Similar threads