What would you do really do?


AL Glover

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Apr 15, 2005
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this is a 2 part question is for everyone,but mostly for the women,since most took the attitude at the time to allow "women & children first,but reguardless of male or female,
#1,,IF U had a chance,(like Ismay) & a choice would u stay aboard or climb in a lifeboat?
#2 if U decided to stay,(mostly men) what would your final act be,befor she took the final dive??
for me I think if my son & (late) wife were safely in a life boat, I would try & ride the Big T down to maybe 20 feet of the water then TRY to swim to a lifeboat,(prefer) the one wife son are in.
 
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Mikael Jonsson

Guest
I would go in the lifeboat. I don't like cold water. If I stayed I would search for something to stay afloat on.

If I had relatives on the boat I would help them first.
 
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Daniel Odysseus

Guest
Yeah, wouldn't we all... But I wouldn't do what some men did to get on a boat. I'd at least break a door loose or something and paddle away to a lifeboat on that before the ship sank. But then again if I were really on the ship, I'd probably do something much different... like panic.

-Daniel Odysseus
 

James Hill

Member
Feb 20, 2002
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i would do what Andrews says in A Night To Remember.Lower yourselves into the water by the ropes hanging over the side dont jump if you can avoid it when your in the water swim away from the ship at once.he also says put your lifebelts on and were something white.to anyone who would stay on the ship until the end the boats would have time to get away is that not true.
 
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Patricia Bowman Rogers Winship

Guest
I am very struck by what Lightoller said about his decision to refuse to obey a direct order from Chief Officer Wilde, and stay with the ship, rather than going in a lifeboat. As terrible as the ordeal of Collapsible B was, he says he's glad he decided to do it, rather than have to listen to the criticisms of the armchair sailors about his conduct that night, for the rest of his life.

Pat W
 
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Ashley Regan

Guest
Hi Al,

As a woman and a lifeguard my interest in helping people would probably have caused my death that night. Given the choice of a lifeboat seat or trying to help people drowning in the sea; I would try to save lives. I know the cold would have gotten me before I would be able to make much of a difference but if it was to happen today on a modern cruise ship (which I've taken a few of) I would try to help rather than be safe and secure in a boat.

Ashley
 
Jun 26, 2002
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I would first panic, probably a lot, then get into a boat, I am not a very good swimmer.

For the men, if they were going to lower the boats half empty anyway, what is really wrong about climbing in one? Yes, you might be talked about because you survived, but isn't it better to live for your family. There were so many empty seats, why not fill them with men who were close by, like I said they lowering them half empty anyway.
 

Tracy Smith

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Apr 20, 2012
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South Carolina USA
I agree, Melinda. I think it was especially tragic that Michel Navratil, a man traveling alone with his two toddler boys, was turned away from a boat.

For all anyone on Titanic knew, he was the only parent the boys had (he wasn't)and by separating him from his children, they would be made orphans. At any rate, mother or not, she wasn't present, and I think the little boys shouldn't have been separated from their father. It seems to me an exception could have been made in this instance.
 

Adam McGuirk

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May 19, 2002
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Yes but Tracy the problem with exceptions is well about anyone can come up and give a good reason why they should go. I think Mr Astor had a good reason to go but he was turned down. Its hard to let one father in but then another comes up and the officer say no you can't go. I don't think there was enough time for the officers to play judge that night and decides what men should go. They simply said women and children first. Well Murdoch didn't.
Adam
 

Tracy Smith

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Apr 20, 2012
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Too bad Mr Navratil didn't go to one of Murdoch's boats.

Murdoch interpreted it as women and children first, where Lightoller interpreted it as women and children only. I think I like the Murdoch interpretation better
happy.gif
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Adam McGuirk

Member
May 19, 2002
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Tracy I like the Murdoch way better do. I just wonder what Lightoller would have done with me. I am 14, would I have got off like Ryerson? And yes my point needed to be corrected what I should have said was women and children first. Thats like in Camerons move if Jack and Rose would have been exactly on the other sight they could have hopped in with Isamy.
Adam
 

Tracy Smith

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Apr 20, 2012
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14 was kind of a grey area as to the distinction between man and boy in those days. I think that the age you appeared to be might have been a factor as to whether you got into a boat. Some 14 year olds have reached their adult height already, while some look much younger.

When I was 14, I'd already reached my adult height of 5-11. My son, on the other hand, was just barely five feet tall at 14, so I think he might have squeaked by. If I'd been on the Titanic with my son, I'd have told them he was ten or eleven; there wouldn't have been any way I'd have left a 14 year old to die.
 

Adam McGuirk

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May 19, 2002
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Yeah it is a very grey area. Im not really a child anymore but I am not definitely not an adult. I am about 5'5 so I could maybe pass for 13. I will be 15 in August, they wouldn't have really wanted many 15 year olds. I would have just gone to Murdoch!
Adam
 

Pat Cook

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Apr 27, 2000
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The situation must be viewed during the time it happened, I believe. For instance, position meant everything then. Recall that many of the First Class men who survived were castigated (some more than others) for having done so - stories made up about them dressing up at women to leave the ship. Whereas I can recall no Second Class men having this problem. And, indeed, a few 3rd Class men actually did this (Buckley, Ryan) and nobody seemed to care (Buckley even testified about it).

As far as what I would personally do (given the situation being the same - 1912) I really couldn't say. Stick around the Starboard side, I suppose.

Best regards,
Cook
 
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Timothy Brandsoy

Guest
Chivalry may not be dead, men nowadays are just as likely to allow women and children to go first. BUT if there was a seat open I'd be happy to take it!

If I was stuck without a seat I'd try and get off the ship as 'dry' as possible to avoid the elements.

When I was on the QEII I was with my dad who was in a wheelchair. I would have taken charge of him first....which brings up MY question. Where the elderly treated well? I know the Strauses refused to go, but did any older men get on Titanic's lifeboats?

Oh, and I did have a bottle of vodka in my cabin. I would have been able to sail my own ship! (As in two or three sheets to the wind LOL)

Tim
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Knowing me, I would have probably hung around indoors until I found out beyond the shadow of a doubt that the damage was bad enough to leave the ship. And, by the time it was really evident to me (I'm usually the last one to realize everything), it would likely be too late. Even if I did come to my senses in time, knowing my luck, I would have gone to all the wrong places and would not be alotted a seat in one of the boats. At 16, I stand 5' 11", and couldn't easily pass for someone younger. Oh yeah, I can't swim either!


Cheers,
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-B.W.
 
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Reece Ewington

Guest
>I don’t know what I would do. I would help the offices as much as I could >so they would be grateful and send me into a boat. I think the offices >wouldn’t fall for that so I would still be helping them with collapsible A >(because wild was working on that one). As the people try to get >collapsible A I would help them on until I realise its sinking because of >all the water in it. Then I would start pushing people trying to get on. >Because I’m really skinny and get cold easily (I cant stay in a pool more >than 10 minutes on a 40 degree day) I’m sorry to say I probly wouldn’t make >it through the night and be one of 4 bodies found by the MacKay Benits >crew. (Even know there were three) It’s a sad fact now that I think of it. From Reece Ewington 17 M Melbourne
 
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Karin Kasper

Guest
I'm a chicken at heart and I get cold way too easily. I would have been one of those women shrieking that she wasn't going to get into one of those tiny little boats, and my husband would have picked me up and thrown me in there. (I'm 5'4" and he's 6'2"- it would have been an easy task for him!!) Later I would have been quite relieved that he threw me in there, of course, as it was a bit chilly that night. ;)
 
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Laura Melinda Varjo

Guest
I probably would of went down w/ Titanic. First of all, my native language isn`t English, and back then I probably wouldn`t know any. So, I 16, together with my brother 14, and sister 30, her husband,baby and my mom, if we would of sailed together, probably Aranka, and my niece Luca, would be the only survivirs among us. My brother in law would of stayed on the ship, because he is a very, very honset and lovable man, they wouldn`t let my little brother Detre in, because he was 14, a man, he is way taller than me, and I wouldn`t go with out my brother, who stuck up for me in school many, many times, and I also wouldn`t do w/o my mom, who loved me and raised me.Mom would of probably stayed on the ship, if she didn`t see all of her children in the lifeboats. So the four of us would of perished. Well, at least I have strange feeling I would of. The only thing I would think of is the same thing that noble Edith Evans did, at least Aranka is safe with baby Luca(17 months now, so the whole Varjo family will not be wiped out. Besides, Aranka would have a child to take care of, what`s the use for me to live ? To tell my grandparents and dad in the USA my mom, brother, and brother-in-law perished ? I would die for my beloved ones.But I think, today,if something like Titanic happened nowadays, we would of survive-people who are interested in the Titanic, because that Titanic tragedy has surely taught us to be careful and serious what is happening around us.
Lorie
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