What would you have done?


Dec 29, 2006
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Witney
It is true that, once all of the lifeboats had been launched, feelings of terror would have started to appear among those left aboard the sinking ship. HOWEVER, everybody was equipped with substantial cork life jackets and these must have engendered an illusion of "safety". Many people must have assumed that they could have stepped gently into the water and awaited the rescue ships - not realising that the ice cold waters of the North Atlantic can probably extinguish life in about fifteen minutes.
 
Jul 26, 2009
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I would immediately put on my jacket and lifebelt then I would rush to the boat deck and board a lifeboat. I'm 15 so I think maybe they will allow me. If not, then I would say, "I can help in rowing."
 
>> It is true that, once all of the lifeboats had been launched,
>> feelings of terror would have started to appear among those
>> left aboard the sinking ship.

I read that survivors don't recall the panic that's depicted in films. One survivor remembered a woman screaming and that drawing attention because it was so out of the ordinary during the sinking.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>I read that survivors don't recall the panic that's depicted in films.<<

Maybe some didn't but other reported a very different story. Perhaps not of panic, but certainly of some very fast action to get those last two collapsibles away. There was also the report of a mob of people coming up from below near the end and they were hardly calm.
 
L

Lynda Franklin

Guest
I would stay on the boat and go to maybe my cabin ,or the reading and writing room and simply read until the end .
 

Haowei Shi

Member
Aug 25, 2010
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Avon,Indiana
I would get a lfebelt.If the officers in the port said"no more boys" I would use the GSC to get to the starboard and get in to Boat 2 or Boat C.No one would leave the ship untile everyone board the life boat.If the life boates are gone.I will tell every body to get a deck chair and walk in to the water in the A deck.After the ship sink.A life boat is going to pick us up.

Haowei
FULL SPEED AHEAD!!!!
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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>I'd handcuff myself to J Bruce Ismay.

Make sure to be clutching a charming child as you do so, for maximum pathos:

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Handcuffing yourself to the inside of a boat not a bad idea, either. Handcuffing yourself to a woman whose death would generate bad publicity for the WSL if she was denied entry because of you...I'd go for Rothes... might work.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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UK
Well, if that's the only child available then I'll take my chances in the water. Handcuffing yourself to the inside of a boat - not a bad idea. But think twice if the only one left is collapsible B.
 
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Crystal Von

Guest
My presume reaction at first,exciting,after fearful for my life,affraid,put a life jacket on and I;d presume to ask an officer "may I hop board a life boat".
I;d use the term presume,I really don;t know how I will act in a situation like "life and death" never been through a horror like the TItanic disaster before.

Oh yeah,hi there.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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I'll handcuff myself to Bod G and Jim K. At least then I'll have some entertaining argument to listen to as I go down.
But I can tell you one thing. Never, ever, listen to skippers etc., who tell you to go down below when it's getting rough or dangerous. Stay on/near the deck. Much better to go looking at the stars or the sun, than screaming in a cabin....
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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UK
Now, Mon, you've seen enough disastrous - I mean disaster - movies to know that the standard procedure when faced with the imminent arrival of large amounts of ominous liquid is to go down - underground car parks, subway tunnels, below decks etc. No fun otherwise.
 
Nov 11, 2007
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I like your answer Sam! I would do the same thing... get roaring drunk. Maybe all the alcohol in my blood would probably keep me alive a little longer in the freezing water. I personally think that's how Chief Baker Charles Joughin survived being in the water for so long next to Collapsible B because he decided to get drunk.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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Party-poopers will tell you that drinking booze shortens your life in freezing waters. It's odd that anecdotal evidence suggests the opposite. But there you go. Who knows?

I've never been in a shipwreck, but I have been on some very dodgy Greek boats travelling between wonderful Greek islands. I sat on deck with the chickens, the peasants, and the goats. We had a much better time than the conventional tourists below; singing, drinking and eating, and if the worst had come to the worst - and it sometimes felt like it - we'd have either gone under the stars or at least felt like we'd had a chance of survival. I was young at the time, so felt that I'd live for ever. I'm not now ... but I'd still sit on deck.
 

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